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Favorite defunct New York City restaurants


Pan
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Thre was a restaurant in NYC in the early 80's that i had never been to myself, but supposedly was "the" place to dine. It was very expensive for the time. I can't remember what it was called. Any thoughts?

The Palace? It was featured on 60 Minutes with Andy Rooney.

That was the one. Anyone here ever been? What was it like? It was the first restaurant to capture my imagination through the media.

Sadly, I never made it there. When I was a teenager I saw Andy Rooney's food special wherein he chastised The Palace -- "The most expensive restaurant in the world" for serving subpar food. (I think dinner ran a whopping $100 per person. :shock:)

I knew then and there that I had to go just for the hell of it. I had a ton of babysitting money saved up but on our next Broadway bound bus trip to NYC (from Boston) no one else wanted to go because of Andy's assessment... and we are talking about a busload of women who frequented Tavern On The Green and Sardi's every other month.

I think it closed shortly after Andy's report-- the power of network tv.

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Ratner's had competition on 2nd Avenue, a place called Rappoport's, another dairy restaurant--  great blintzes!

In another genre, remember the original TGI Friday's on 1st and 63rd...this was when it was the only one, made giant cocktails and giant burgers!  And one block down, across the Avenue, was Maxwell's Plum, "competition" of sorts.  Those were the good old days...

Thank you. I've been trying to remember for the longest time the name of the dairy restaurant that was on 2nd off E 4th. Having been in the area habitually to visit the Fillmore East--and later CBGB's--my memory is slightly damaged.

I also miss the Automat. Especially their mac and cheese. When you consider inflation over the years, I think they just eventually ran out of nickels.

PJ

"Epater les bourgeois."

--Lester Bangs via Bruce Sterling

(Dori Bangs)

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I miss Kiev on 2nd Ave. I know that there is a restaurant still there, and it has the name Kiev, but it is nothing like the Kiev I went to at 3 in the morning when I was in college 14 years ago...

There were no "Fiesta" plates, no oak or cherry or whatever finished counters no pretentious customers ... just really good solid food.

Went to the locale a few weeks ago, it wasn't there - the place had the name "Kiev", but it wasn't "KIEV"

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I miss La Colombe d'Or. It was the first upscale place I went when I moved to New York and one of the first places I went with my wife (obviously when she was my girlfriend.)

More recently, I was disappointed when Clementine closed (Otto is now in the space) because it was one of the best delivery options (Kumquat) we had. It's nice that Otto delivers now, but I miss some of the healthier options from Kumquat.

"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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I miss Kiev on 2nd Ave.  I know that there is a restaurant still there, and it has the name Kiev, but it is nothing like the Kiev I went to at 3 in the morning when I was in college 14 years ago...

Nothing like the old Kiev's kielbasa and eggs after a long night of absorbing the Holiday's watered-down drinks or cheap beer at the Blue and Gold.

Leshko's on Avenue A was another reliable source of early-morning grease, if perhaps somewhat less sanitary than the Kiev.

aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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The Duck Joint because of its atmosphere, pate at the bar while waiting for a table (sometimes I hoped I would never be called) and for the best roast duck, goose and pork schnietzel (sp?) I ever tasted.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

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The old Village Gate on Bleeker. The food was nothing special, but man the jazz was the best :wub:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Here are my additions to the list: La Fonda del Sol; Orsini's; San Marco; The Italian Pavillion; Romeo Salta; and three places on West 46th (Restaurant Row)-- Chez Cardinale, A La Fourchette and Jack's Epicure.

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The old Village Gate on Bleeker. The food was nothing special, but man the jazz was the best :wub:

Along the same lines: Lush Life, at the other end of the Bleecker Street side of the building from the Gate. Except that the food there was actually pretty good for a jazz club, as it was at Sweet Basil (same ownership). But the good news now is Jazz Standard, under Blue Smoke.

Yeah, La Fonda del Sol. Who knew back then (mid-1960s) that Latin American food could be Haute? And on the subject of Restaurant Associates, Zum Zum (about which there is a thread somewhere).

Non-RA chain, Dosanko.

And, until Mohammed finds a new space in the vicinity of Fulton Street, ALPHANOOSE :sad::sad::sad:

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Pisces recently closed. It was on on 1st Ave., right? Or A?

Southwest corner of A and 6th. For the life of me, I can't think of the name of the place that's replaced it and have yet to try it.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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The old Village Gate on Bleeker. The food was nothing special, but man the jazz was the best :wub:

My partner Kirk worked in their box office until it closed...he has great memories of that place. If you look above the pharmacy that took the space, you can still see the old sign. Penny Arcade and Jacques Brel will hopefully be playing the Village Gate sign for a long time to come.

As noted in other threads, I miss the old-school MePa restaurants like Rio Mar and Astray Cafe. Hopefully Florent will not follow.

:smile:

Jamie

See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,

Is notwithstanding up.

Julius Caesar, Act II, Scene ii

biowebsite

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Meat Packing.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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there was a thai place on Pell. not sure what the name was but i don't think it got much play. the best of the lot for that area, imo.

and i miss Local off of times square, if only because the bartender used to give the bar away, and i was more often than not on the receiving end.

Edited by tommy (log)
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. . .

and i miss Local off of times square, if only because the bartender used to give the bar away, and i was more often than not on the receiving end.

Maybe that's why it closed?

i think it had something to do with the fire. but believe me, they got plenty of money out of my wallet.

in my experience, freebies for regulars are pretty standard. some of us are just a little more regular than others.

Edited by tommy (log)
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Food in Soho, a cafeteria style restaurant on Wooster Street, gone about 15 years now.

no?? geeze, i feel old. they had great poppy seed muffins.

I loved a restaurant called the Sumptuary on Third Ave around 28th. Now that i think of it, i can't remember one dish i had there, but Former Spouse and i used to eat there all the time in '90-'92 when we lived in that neighborhood.

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Trinacria, on 3d Avenue around 28th street. Not really a restaurant, but NY's greatest sandwich shop ever. Gone at least 20-25 years.

I remember that name from my youth, but I can't picture the place - I do remember, J.P. Pizzuro delicatessen in the about the same location - an old line italian deli, like the much smaller salumeria that was on 62nd street between 1st and 2nd Ave.

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Lutece. I dined there as a boy with my parents when Soltner was at the helm and these evenings were forever etched in my young mind. I suppose I can partially blame Soltner for what has become a full-blown high end food addiction in my adult life.

While Lutece was never a contender in NYC after Soltner left, I still loved it. I miss the $26 prix fixe lunches, the crusty old waiters who suffered through my rusty French vocabulary with a smile, the gracious FOH staff who always made me feel like an old friend , the classic Bourgundies by the glass from great producers like Roumier and Leroy, the absolute bank-vault quiet of that prehistoric dining room, and most of all the ridiculously good apple tart.

Their brand of old-school service and style is a thing of the past in NYC as far as I know. La Grenouille is the next closest thing, but has always been a bit too flashy for me to tolerate. It will probably be gone soon too, given the fact that most of their regulars are already partially fossilized.

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