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Creating glazes like Gerald Sattler


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Hi all,

 

Does anyone know how to glaze cakes like Gerald Sattler?  See:

 

 

 

In particular, the second video when it pans to the back large patisseries, where you get what I call a "giraffing" effect (!) - you can see this in some of his videos, he adds the normal chocolate mirror glaze, then adds other colours on a palette knife going forward then back to create the "swipe", but the colours repel each other.

 

I suspect this is either due to more water in one than fat in the  other or an alcohol base for the second colour (using titanium oxide as base white?), but I don't really have the time right now to try out all different combos!

 

I saw one video in another language where they suggest the first glaze is at usual temp (say, 35oC) and then the second colour is at 65oC. I tried this with a white chocolate based glaze however I could not achieve the cool separation pattern so ended up doing some lateral swipes with my small pallete knife from it. Looks ok-ish but not happy:

 

pink_flower.jpg

 

Would love to better know this technique - any thoughts or help appreciated!

 

Thanks,

TCD

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There was a nice demo on mirror glazing done by member dejaq you might want to take a peek at. While not an identical finish, it looks like a pretty similar technique was probably involved with just some color and application variations to get the different looks.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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From the video, it appears he is blowing air over the cake and tilting it to achieve the design.

 

Here is another video with some extra recipe info included: https://youtu.be/2EwlYjz9XLM

"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali
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Yep, looks like they're doing something pretty much identical to the technique in dejaq's tutorial with the exception of spreading the color with air instead of a spatula. Pretty cool, I'm going to have to try it.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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In the videos Curls posted, he scrapes the spatula with the second color back into the bucket with the first, so that makes me think the formulas couldn't be too drastically different, or you wouldn't want to risk mixing them.

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It's a neutral nappage, some water to thin it down then mixed with some color (I think we used oxide de titane because we made white to go on top of chocolate).  And yes to the 65oC as well. We did it in class once or twice.

 

I'm sure there's probably more than one way to get the effect.

Edited by trisme11 (log)
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Chocolate Glaze

 

300 g Water

600 g Sugar

600 g Glucose

 

Bring to a rolling boil.

 

Remove from heat and add 40 g Gelatin - bloomed in 240 g water then melted

 

Add 400 g Sweetened Cond Milk. 

 

Pour over 600 g Chocolate (milk, white or dark) and use an immersion blender and so you don't get air bubbles. Add whatever coloring you'd like. Use at around 90-94 degrees F.

 

Use a cold set neutral glaze like Valrhona's Absolut Cristal thinned down with 10-20% water and coloring. 

 

The chocolate glaze contains fat and the neutral doesn't which causes the pattern.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
On ‎11‎/‎2‎/‎2015 at 6:31 AM, Drewman said:

Chocolate Glaze

 

300 g Water

600 g Sugar

600 g Glucose

 

Bring to a rolling boil.

 

Remove from heat and add 40 g Gelatin - bloomed in 240 g water then melted

 

Add 400 g Sweetened Cond Milk. 

 

Pour over 600 g Chocolate (milk, white or dark) and use an immersion blender and so you don't get air bubbles. Add whatever coloring you'd like. Use at around 90-94 degrees F.

 

Use a cold set neutral glaze like Valrhona's Absolut Cristal thinned down with 10-20% water and coloring. 

 

The chocolate glaze contains fat and the neutral doesn't which causes the pattern.


Just out of curiosity, this recipe is identical to the recipe in one of Gerald Sattler's videos other than it contains ~50% more gelatin (40 g here, 26 g in his video), is that just a personal preference thing or are there situational reasons to vary the amount?

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Got the recipe from Inspirations & Creations book by JM Perruchon MOF. Sometimes I get air bubbles while G Sattler never does. Maybe I'll decrease the gelatin to see what happens. Thanks for noticing.

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On 11/1/2015 at 7:20 AM, The Choc Doc said:

Hi all,

 

Does anyone know how to glaze cakes like Gerald Sattler?  See:

 

 

 

 

 

In particular, the second video when it pans to the back large patisseries, where you get what I call a "giraffing" effect (!) - you can see this in some of his videos, he adds the normal chocolate mirror glaze, then adds other colours on a palette knife going forward then back to create the "swipe", but the colours repel each other.

 

I suspect this is either due to more water in one than fat in the  other or an alcohol base for the second colour (using titanium oxide as base white?), but I don't really have the time right now to try out all different combos!

 

I saw one video in another language where they suggest the first glaze is at usual temp (say, 35oC) and then the second colour is at 65oC. I tried this with a white chocolate based glaze however I could not achieve the cool separation pattern so ended up doing some lateral swipes with my small pallete knife from it. Looks ok-ish but not happy:

 

pink_flower.jpg

 

Would love to better know this technique - any thoughts or help appreciated!

 

Thanks,

TCD

 

Edited by Lovebaking2125
I made a mistake and pushed submitt button...sorry.I'm new here (log)
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Hi,I figured out EASIEST way to copy Gerald Sattler's glaze tequnique. I went crazy searching on web,finally came across a Chinese website showing great simple way,you can Use Google to translate it in English. 

http://suegan.blogspot.com/2015/12/chocolate-mirror-cake.html?m=1  you can Use chocolate mirror glaze of your choice, then color glaze part is below.this person's chocolate glaze worked great too,I liked the fact it didn't need to be made a day ahead.

 

Clear piping gel

Little water

Drop or two of wilton white Icing color(depends on how much quantity you are making)

Then add any color you want to this mixture.i just microwaved this mixture worked like a charm,exact effect like Gerald Sattler. I used hair dryer to blow.

 

That's it!

 

Water,you need to adjust to what kind design you want. Thick or thin,it will affect and create different effect.

 

Good luck everyone.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

That'll be convenient but honestly it wasn't too difficult to figure out just by spending a few minutes watching his youtube videos. I've puttered around with it a bit on a very small scale without problems. I don't really want to make large quantities of cold use neutral glaze myself though, so I'm digging around for a Canadian online source for it before I do any serious playing.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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48 minutes ago, gap said:

Out of curiosity, is there a lot of wastage by mixing two different glazes?


I haven't done enough with it to know the answer to that but I would think the runoff can always be salvaged. A little white in with a red glaze, for example, isn't going to make a lot of difference when added back to the main mass. And if it does alter it too much, you could just toss in some more red color. There would be some color combos that would prevent it being returned to the main batch (any color over a white base, for example) but if you were using, say, a green color over a white glaze, you'd just get a really pale green when the runoff was mixed. That could be used as a pale green glaze or you could add green coloring gel to get whatever shade of green you want. I can't picture too many situations where actual waste would be generated though, it just may take a little planning and creativity to make use of everything.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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  • 2 months later...

Okay, did this today. For those of you reading my story in the OffTopic:Chipmunk, today I brought a high school kid and his friend in. He's been saying he wants to learn new things and recently showed me his tie dye cake which were from boxed mixes:

Chipmunk6.jpeg

Well, that wouldn't do, now would it. So I said, let's make it from scratch and cooler! He was very excited. So he and a friend came in. He was more interested in the finish so I prepped the cake. We did Pierre Herme's cocoa cake (3 layers), brushed with caramel sauce, alternating layers of peanut butter curd and caramel ganache (his chosen flavors), and encased in a chocolate mousse. The cakes were then frozen to prepare the cake for the glaze. We prepared the bright colors according to Drewman's recipe above. We each picked a color - turned out to be the primaries sort of.

Chipmunk1.jpg

Then I had the kids stir to cool down the base glaze which they colored black...cuz that's what kids do to perfectly good pastries.

Chipmunk2.jpg

Yes, i fed them my chocolate chip cookie dough so they could be a professional chef like me and eat like I eat!

I had made 4 individual cakes.

Chipmunk3.jpg

And then we poured the black glaze kinda heavy like in the videos. The kids then drizzled the colors. I said "less is more" and they clearly have a different understanding of that phrase :)

Chipmunk4.jpg

I didn't remember the airbrush so I tried blasting with alternating blow torch and freeze spray but that didn't really work. But, a mirror glaze is still a mirror glaze. The kids were ecstatic and couldn't wait to take them into work at Sonic to show everyone what they had made. We're set for another date to re-do it using LESS color and the airbrush.

Chipmunk5.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by gfron1 (log)
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My 2 cents on the process. I was more concerned by the viscosity effect of the sweetened condensed milk than the gelatin. I used silver and recipes tend to not specify, but I might back off a sheet, but that's not the issue I felt. It was that milk is so viscous. Also, I've always struggled to take my mirror glazed cakes off the rack without damaging the edge. Any tips there are appreciated.

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Can you raise them up off the rack before glazing with a ramekin or something (or a cake ring for larger cakes)? Makes it easier to get something under it.

Edited by keychris (log)
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For smaller cakes, I use the lid or cap of something (the cap to our pan spray is pretty handy, you just want to be careful when you're using it to say, unmold individual key lime "pies" that have been made in 3" rings with a torch...).  Even an overturned small plastic souffle cup would work...

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