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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)

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Tri2Cook   
11 minutes ago, Chocolot said:

First part: the mixture is too warm to go in shells. The meltways can be piped. You don't even need to close them.


Thanks! That's what I was afraid of with the fondant. If I want to get a mint fondant (preferably with invertase so that it softens) into shells, is there a good way to do so?


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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30 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


Thanks! That's what I was afraid of with the fondant. If I want to get a mint fondant (preferably with invertase so that it softens) into shells, is there a good way to do so?

I pinch off chunks and press it into the shells.

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Tri2Cook   
1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

I pinch off chunks and press it into the shells.


I'm sitting here laughing at myself because that's such an easy and obvious solution and it never crossed my mind. Thanks! So, could his mint fondant recipe be made, allowed to cool and then pinched and pressed into the shells before the invertase goes to work or am I still over-complicating things? I have fondant, invertase and peppermint oil but I was kinda liking the idea of his addition of the fresh mint leaves as well. At least, I think I like the idea. I keep having this image of people eating them and having little green pieces stuck in their teeth in my head and I'm not sure how much I'd like that.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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33 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I'm sitting here laughing at myself because that's such an easy and obvious solution and it never crossed my mind. Thanks! So, could his mint fondant recipe be made, allowed to cool and then pinched and pressed into the shells before the invertase goes to work or am I still over-complicating things? I have fondant, invertase and peppermint oil but I was kinda liking the idea of his addition of the fresh mint leaves as well. At least, I think I like the idea. I keep having this image of people eating them and having little green pieces stuck in their teeth in my head and I'm not sure how much I'd like that.

Yup - just so. Takes a while for the invertase to have it's effect - and closing it off seems to be a necessary part of the equation I think.

 

 

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curls   

@Tri2Cook are you referring to his Mint Fondants recipe on page 283? If so, I do pipe this filling into molds using a piping bag. I wait until the filling is cool enough to pipe and if it is too thick, I just add some more creme de menthe to thin the filling enough for piping. Once you have piped all your filling, wait until it crusts over and then shell your molds. Enjoy!

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Tri2Cook   
8 hours ago, curls said:

@Tri2Cook are you referring to his Mint Fondants recipe on page 283? If so, I do pipe this filling into molds using a piping bag. I wait until the filling is cool enough to pipe and if it is too thick, I just add some more creme de menthe to thin the filling enough for piping. Once you have piped all your filling, wait until it crusts over and then shell your molds. Enjoy!


It's on page 236 in the book I have (the one with the black cover, not the red) but it sounds like we're probably talking about the same thing. Thanks!


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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curls   
57 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


It's on page 236 in the book I have (the one with the black cover, not the red) but it sounds like we're probably talking about the same thing. Thanks!

You're welcome. I hope you like them. Nice chocolate & mint flavor - great for the holidays.

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patris   

I recently made the pumpkin caramel ganache on page 145 and loved the texture and the caramel flavor. I would like to make just a plain caramel ganache with that same texture and wondered if I could just omit the 100 grams of pumpkin purée and the spices, or would I need to up the total volume of the caramel component of the recipe to make up for that volume, as I assume the pumpkin counts as a liquifier? There is a recipe for slabbed caramel ganache on page 124 that also looks wonderful, but I will be using this as a bonbon filling so I think I want the lower chocolate to liquifier ratio in the pumpkin caramel recipe.


Patty

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Jim D.   
5 hours ago, patris said:

I recently made the pumpkin caramel ganache on page 145 and loved the texture and the caramel flavor. I would like to make just a plain caramel ganache with that same texture and wondered if I could just omit the 100 grams of pumpkin purée and the spices, or would I need to up the total volume of the caramel component of the recipe to make up for that volume, as I assume the pumpkin counts as a liquifier? There is a recipe for slabbed caramel ganache on page 124 that also looks wonderful, but I will be using this as a bonbon filling so I think I want the lower chocolate to liquifier ratio in the pumpkin caramel recipe.

I haven't made the original Greweling recipe for a while (I developed a different version of it), but I do recall that it did not firm up enough, and I ended up having to add more chocolate/cocoa butter. So you did not have this issue?

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patris   
11 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I haven't made the original Greweling recipe for a while (I developed a different version of it), but I do recall that it did not firm up enough, and I ended up having to add more chocolate/cocoa butter. So you did not have this issue?

 

I had no problems with it at all - the texture was pleasantly soft but far from fluid, and I capped the shells fairly soon (a few hours, I think) after filling.


Patty

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Jim D.   

Does anyone know the ways in which the first and second editions of Greweling's Chocolates and Confections differ? And for those who has seen both, is purchasing the second one useful? I have encountered one example on eGullet in a reference to pipeable marshmallow being included in the 2nd edition.

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Tri2Cook   
4 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Does anyone know the ways in which the first and second editions of Greweling's Chocolates and Confections differ? And for those who has seen both, is purchasing the second one useful? I have encountered one example on eGullet in a reference to pipeable marshmallow being included in the 2nd edition.


I've wanted to ask this same question but I've avoided it because I more than half suspected that knowing the answer would result in having to buy another book. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Jim D.   
2 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I've wanted to ask this same question but I've avoided it because I more than half suspected that knowing the answer would result in having to buy another book. :D

 

I felt exactly the same way. But today I saw that pipeable marshmallow is included in the 2nd edition, and that is something I am looking for. I'm just not sure that justifies another $50 chocolate book.

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32 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

I felt exactly the same way. But today I saw that pipeable marshmallow is included in the 2nd edition, and that is something I am looking for. I'm just not sure that justifies another $50 chocolate book.

 

Some things justify a trip to a bookstore and use of the camera on your smartphone. :ph34r:

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On 5/30/2017 at 4:15 PM, pastrygirl said:

 

Some things justify a trip to a bookstore and use of the camera on your smartphone. :ph34r:

 

Oh my!!!

And here I thought I was the only one  :rolleyes:

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Jim D.   

I didn't get a response to my question under the marshmallow topic, so I'll try again in the Greweling discussion. I have more info since completing his marshmallow recipe.

 

I'm making a variation on the "Hot Chocolate" two-layer marshmallow recipe. I made his marshmallow recipe and spread it (with considerable difficulty) in a frame. I think I either overcooked the syrup or overbeat the marshmallow mixture. Then, for the second layer, instead of his chocolate ganache, I made a lime one (the idea of combining marshmallow and lime comes from Melissa Coppel). The lime recipe (from Ewald Notter) never really sets up firmly enough, so for dipping I added some white chocolate and cocoa butter, and it was better, but still rather soft. I let the lime set for more than a day, then applied a foot to the ganache, and cut the slab on a guitar (with the wires lightly oiled, marshmallow layer on top). It cut better than I anticipated, but I could tell the pieces were "melting" into each other. I chilled it and then tried to separate the pieces, but had to use an oiled knife. In some pieces the lime layer has separated from the marshmallow. They look OK (but not great) and are rather rough around the edges. I can see that whereas I could dip them, they would not look great.

 

The taste of marshmallow and lime is delicious together, but what could be done to improve the situation? The marshmallow was rather firm, so if I made it more pliable, then I am sure it would never cut on a guitar and the pieces would certainly flow back together once the wires had passed through. Just as obvious (from Greweling's photo and photos on eGullet from those who have made the Hot Chocolate recipe), the recipe as written does work.

 

I'm thinking of translating the recipe into a molded piece, with pipeable marshmallow (undercooked and underbeaten) and a layer of lime ganache on top, but I hate to admit defeat. Any ideas are welcome.


Edited by Jim D. (log)

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Tri2Cook   
1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

I didn't get a response to my question under the marshmallow topic, so I'll try again in the Greweling discussion. I have more info since completing his marshmallow recipe.

 


Hopefully someone will be able to help. I saw your other post but don't have an anything helpful. I've never made marshmallows with Greweling's recipe and never layered with a ganache. I don't have a guitar so there's never been any decision making when cutting. I have some marshmallow ideas I'd like to try in chocolates but I admitted defeat without ever entering the battle and decided to hold out for a good pipeable marshmallow recipe. I may have to invest in that second edition of the book after all...


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Tri2Cook   

I may still invest in the second edition of the book at some point if I'm convinced there's good reason to but I managed to dig up the pipeable marshmallow recipe. It's not being piped in shells and doesn't say anything about a temp where it becomes to firm to pipe so I'm going to have to play with it to find out if it can still be piped once cool enough for shells.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Jim D.   
4 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

I may still invest in the second edition of the book at some point if I'm convinced there's good reason to but I managed to dig up the pipeable marshmallow recipe. It's not being piped in shells and doesn't say anything about a temp where it becomes to firm to pipe so I'm going to have to play with it to find out if it can still be piped once cool enough for shells.

 

I will be experimenting as well. Others have said (there is a thread on eGullet on pipeable marshmallow) that the secret is to stop beating the mixture sooner--though how one determines "sooner" remains a puzzle. It is a great temptation just to use marshmallow fluff from the grocery store (even Greweling calls for it in his at-home book). I have gotten the impression that in Greweling's second edition he calls for using egg whites in the pipeable marshmallow, but I would prefer not to use eggs.

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Tri2Cook   
8 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

I have gotten the impression that in Greweling's second edition he calls for using egg whites in the pipeable marshmallow, but I would prefer not to use eggs.


He uses dried egg white powder if that makes any difference.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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