Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

punk patissier

Chocolates with that Showroom Finish, 2012 –

Recommended Posts

I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

Worth seeing if you can find some pictures that @Chocolot did a while back - she sprayed the same colours onto molds then molded with white and with dark and you wouldn't have known they were the same colors.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

 

You can also mix in a little milk or white chocolate to make the CB thicker and more opaque, like the red on these cacao pods - finger painted in but shows up decently.  I've definitely experienced thinner layers of red all but disappearing on dark chocolate.  The white (Chef Rubber white diamond) was also mixed with more white chocolate (callebaut zephyr).  These are 60% dark shells.

 

IMG_6296.thumb.JPG.e2620f2ffebfc83ceb60fe269a598481.JPG

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Bentley I think the red on those looks awesome. I realize that doesn't count for much if it's not what you want but it really does look nice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Worth seeing if you can find some pictures that @Chocolot did a while back - she sprayed the same colours onto molds then molded with white and with dark and you wouldn't have known they were the same colors.

 

 

 

I found this photo from 2011. I sprayed all the molds the same. Yellow and pink. Some I shelled in white chocolate, some in dark. It was interesting to notice the color change with the shelling chocolate.IMG_0547.thumb.JPG.8b6fbbc7c5a94885f64d2db2c5230893.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really interesting picture, @Chocolot!  Under the red, I did finger swirls of white to try the technique referred to in my other thread about the A519 bonbon (the "How do they do that" thread).  I didn't get the results I was after.  Perhaps my layer of red was too thick.  As it is, the red doesn't look bad -just not what I had in mind - and if the green showed up, it would be satisfactory.  Next time I try these, I think I will backspray the entire tray with white just to make the colors pop.  


Edited by Bentley (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bentley said:

Really interesting picture, @Chocolot!  Under the red, I did finger swirls of white to try the technique referred to in my other thread about the A519 bonbon (the "How do they do that" thread).  I didn't get the results I was after.  Perhaps my layer of red was too thick.  As it is, the red doesn't look bad -just not what I had in mind - and if the green showed up, it would be satisfactory.  Next time I try these, I think I will backspray the entire tray with white just to make the colors pop.  

 

Is the red you are using transparent? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Is the red you are using transparent? 

 

I guess not.  It's Chef Rubber's cardinal red with a little ruby red mixed in.

 

Which CCBs are transparent?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bentley said:

I guess not.  It's Chef Rubber's cardinal red with a little ruby red mixed in.

 

Which CCBs are transparent?

I'm having trouble figuring out if they still sell them. I used to have a whole lot of bottles of their older colors - but they were lost in the overheated warmer incident at the Niagara workshop in 2013. For some reason I think they might have been called classic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at there for the incident....it was horrible, but, the professionals in us pulled together and moved on......

for those reading this, do not try these experiments at home, leave it to the Pros


Edited by RobertM (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to be an EZ Temper commercial, but it has upped my game a bit. This is my Valentine's collection. Since EZ I haven't had a single chocolate stick to the mold and every one is super shiny. More importantly for me since I do smaller production (300-1000 per batch/month) is that I haven't been turning on my large tempering machine. I use my melter and EZ, and the melter has been good at holding my chocolate overnight for use in multiple batches. Generally I deplete the bulk of my tempered chocolate and then refill and start again in the same pan, never letting it fully cool. On my refills I just do the 1% silk add and continue as normal.

 

Anyway...from top to bottom (left row): 12-year balsamic, cinnamon, mango habanero, fennel pollen/honey, lemon

chocoVD18.thumb.jpg.ffc02d6e2b289d3f48dba11410103548.jpg

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Gorgeous looking chocolates. There is no end to your talent. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Anna N said:

 Gorgeous looking chocolates. There is no end to your talent. :)

Sure there is. You should see how lousy I am at ironing.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

Sure there is. You should see how lousy I am at ironing.

 Pressed seams are highly overrated!  

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Teaching someone to use the Fuji yesterday - playing with some masking.

 

The sphere has potential but needs work. 

 

IMG_7990.jpg.0dc3cc8da7a091d98660046e4bd20094.jpg

 

IMG_7998.jpg.f78449319f5261b76130482a3341e17a.jpg

 

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Teaching someone to use the Fuji yesterday - playing with some masking. The sphere has potential but needs work. 

 

 

Very attractive. What did you use for the masking for the stripe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Very attractive. What did you use for the masking for the stripe?

This - in a variety of widths. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the countless threads on making stripes on shells--with no clear winner--is this the holy grail of striping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Jim D. said:

After the countless threads on making stripes on shells--with no clear winner--is this the holy grail of striping?

Time will tell!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Time will tell!

The biggest problem I have had is with cocoa butter seeping under the tape. The weaker the adhesive, the more the seepage. Did this tape prevent that? There appear to be a few small places along the edge of the stripe where the underlying color comes through, but that may be just the photo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I think this tape was a little wider than fit smoothly on the bottom and that's why I had creep under the edges. More care taken when putting it down might prevent this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

 I think this tape was a little wider than fit smoothly on the bottom and that's why I had creep under the edges. More care taken when putting it down might prevent this


I followed the link and then searched around to see if I could find some half that width, so 1/8", but no luck. I may add a roll of that 1/4" the next time I do an amazon order... if I decide I'm brave enough to venture into that level of fancy decorating. :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By SweetandSnappyJen
      Hi Folks:
       
      First time poster here!  (Although I browse the content quite often). I've been making filled chocolates for a while, but have stuck with fairly simple ganache-like fillings. I'm trying to up my game a bit, but I'm having some trouble understanding at which temperature certain fillings should be piped in. I'm using Grewling's guide to the temperature at which to pipe in fillings and he refers to 'room temperature', 'warm' and 'hot'. What is 'warm' and what is 'hot'? I'm guessing 'hot' can't be hotter than 90F, as it will melt the shell? I'm currently making a jelly that i'd like to pipe in, layering with a ganache, but the jelly is still at 98F and setting pretty quickly, on the road to un-pipeable. Anyone's thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Jen
    • By JeanneCake
      Anyone have any info on this?  Bake Magazine blurb
    • By Kerry Beal
      Can you believe this is our 10th annual workshop? And here we are back in Niagara College in beautiful Niagara on the Lake where it all began in 2009.
       

       
      The view from my room - the pergola down there we will have access to for Show and Tell on Friday night.
       
      I had every intention of soaking in a nice warm bath after my arrival - alas not a tub to be seen - and while the shower is quite attractive  - it doesn't invite soaking!
       
      Those who can't soak can at least drink if they have remembered to bring small specimen bottles of booze. I somehow pictured a nice glass tumbler for my negroni - but alas...
       
       
       

       
       
      Tomorrow morning the whirlwind will begin with a trip across the border to Tomric - hope everyone remembers their passport.
       
    • By gfron1
      Has anyone taken one of Andrey's classes. I know they've been mentioned in the How Do They Do That thread, but I can't remember if anyone has taken a course. I'm curious because he continues to do methods that are groundbreaking. Not cheap for an online course, but I'm interested in taking his praline course.
       
      I just watched his free tempering class and it was good, nothing special but good enough to allay my fears that the Russian to English translation or camerawork might make the class not worthwhile.
       
      Thnx.
    • By pastrygirl

       
      saw this post and questioned why  “in theory, this won’t work”, response so far is “starch in chocolate can be problematic”
       
      Ok ... obviously adding a lot of fine dry material will decrease fluidity, and things could get weird if you were going to add cream and make ganache, but how else would milling popcorn into chocolate “not work”?  My experiments so far suggest you just need enough warm cocoa butter to keep things moving, how would starchy popcorn be different from fibrous fruits?  
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×