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punk patissier

Chocolates with that Showroom Finish, 2012 –

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I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

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31 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

Worth seeing if you can find some pictures that @Chocolot did a while back - she sprayed the same colours onto molds then molded with white and with dark and you wouldn't have known they were the same colors.

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I have discovered that, when sprayed on, red cocoa butter does not show up as expected on dark chocolate. If you finger-paint red (and thus get a thicker coat), it is closer to looking red. The only solution I have found for the spray-painting issue is to add a layer of white on top of the red; then the red looks right. Learning about how the various colors behave has been a challenge. White and yellow (contrary to expectations) are closer to opaque, whereas dark green and red get muddied. Orange works well, as do light green and light blue.

 

You can also mix in a little milk or white chocolate to make the CB thicker and more opaque, like the red on these cacao pods - finger painted in but shows up decently.  I've definitely experienced thinner layers of red all but disappearing on dark chocolate.  The white (Chef Rubber white diamond) was also mixed with more white chocolate (callebaut zephyr).  These are 60% dark shells.

 

IMG_6296.thumb.JPG.e2620f2ffebfc83ceb60fe269a598481.JPG

 

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@Bentley I think the red on those looks awesome. I realize that doesn't count for much if it's not what you want but it really does look nice.

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Worth seeing if you can find some pictures that @Chocolot did a while back - she sprayed the same colours onto molds then molded with white and with dark and you wouldn't have known they were the same colors.

 

 

 

I found this photo from 2011. I sprayed all the molds the same. Yellow and pink. Some I shelled in white chocolate, some in dark. It was interesting to notice the color change with the shelling chocolate.IMG_0547.thumb.JPG.8b6fbbc7c5a94885f64d2db2c5230893.JPG

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Posted (edited)

Really interesting picture, @Chocolot!  Under the red, I did finger swirls of white to try the technique referred to in my other thread about the A519 bonbon (the "How do they do that" thread).  I didn't get the results I was after.  Perhaps my layer of red was too thick.  As it is, the red doesn't look bad -just not what I had in mind - and if the green showed up, it would be satisfactory.  Next time I try these, I think I will backspray the entire tray with white just to make the colors pop.  


Edited by Bentley (log)

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1 hour ago, Bentley said:

Really interesting picture, @Chocolot!  Under the red, I did finger swirls of white to try the technique referred to in my other thread about the A519 bonbon (the "How do they do that" thread).  I didn't get the results I was after.  Perhaps my layer of red was too thick.  As it is, the red doesn't look bad -just not what I had in mind - and if the green showed up, it would be satisfactory.  Next time I try these, I think I will backspray the entire tray with white just to make the colors pop.  

 

Is the red you are using transparent? 

 

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24 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Is the red you are using transparent? 

 

I guess not.  It's Chef Rubber's cardinal red with a little ruby red mixed in.

 

Which CCBs are transparent?

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3 hours ago, Bentley said:

I guess not.  It's Chef Rubber's cardinal red with a little ruby red mixed in.

 

Which CCBs are transparent?

I'm having trouble figuring out if they still sell them. I used to have a whole lot of bottles of their older colors - but they were lost in the overheated warmer incident at the Niagara workshop in 2013. For some reason I think they might have been called classic.

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Posted (edited)

I was at there for the incident....it was horrible, but, the professionals in us pulled together and moved on......

for those reading this, do not try these experiments at home, leave it to the Pros


Edited by RobertM (log)
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Lemongrass & dark chocolate, moulded dark chocolate...

_069. Green lemongrass (C)_400.jpg

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