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Curing and Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 3)

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I've been reading along in this thread; you guys are doing beautiful things.

Does the book, by any chance, have instructions for mojama--the cured tuna from Spain? I've only read about it, but it sounds wonderful, and at this time of year where I live, I often have access to beautiful loins of tuna fresh off the boat. Anyone have any experience or references?

Welcome Catherine,

There is no recipe in the book for mojama. However, I did a bit of Googling and it appears to be a fairly straight forward concept. EVERY description I found called for the loins to be layered in salt for 2 days, rinsed in fresh running water for 12 hours then hung to cure for 2 weeks.

I agree with Mark. With what we know now, from the book and our experiences, we can cure just about anything. I'm game for this one. As soon as I can locate a suitable loin I'm going to give it a try.

I've got my second attempt at lomo curado in the chamber now. This time I used a loin instead of a tenderloin.


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

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EVERY description I found called for the loins to be layered in salt for 2 days, rinsed in fresh running water for 12 hours then hung to cure for 2 weeks.

Running water for twelve hours? Wouldn't it work just as well to soak with periodic changes of water?

The mojama sounds intriguing. Anyone know what it tastes like?

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Running water for twelve hours? Wouldn't it work just as well to soak with periodic changes of water?

The mojama sounds intriguing. Anyone know what it tastes like?

That's the descriptions I found. But I agree, frequent changes are the more sensible way to go.


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

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I've been reading along in this thread; you guys are doing beautiful things.

Does the book, by any chance, have instructions for mojama--the cured tuna from Spain? I've only read about it, but it sounds wonderful, and at this time of year where I live, I often have access to beautiful loins of tuna fresh off the boat. Anyone have any experience or references?

Welcome Catherine,

There is no recipe in the book for mojama. However, I did a bit of Googling and it appears to be a fairly straight forward concept. EVERY description I found called for the loins to be layered in salt for 2 days, rinsed in fresh running water for 12 hours then hung to cure for 2 weeks.

I agree with Mark. With what we know now, from the book and our experiences, we can cure just about anything. I'm game for this one. As soon as I can locate a suitable loin I'm going to give it a try.

I've got my second attempt at lomo curado in the chamber now. This time I used a loin instead of a tenderloin.

What "recipe" are you using for this? I would think the recipe for Bresaola might work. right?

BTW, That is some cool looking bluefish up there! I have no doubt it tasted as good as it looked.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Elie, the "recipes" I found (really just descriptions of the process with no measurements) all said just salt.

Since I can't imagine using up an entire loin (especially if I wasn't fond of the taste) I think I'll try a couple of different cures on smaller pieces.

I'm headed to Charleston tomorrow and am hoping Whole Foods has some.


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

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Hello Folks, My first post to this thread....

I have been looking at it for a few weeks, and it got me to dig out my sausage stuff. I got the Rhulman book and read it along with the others I already had...I have not made any sausage for about ten years, and this was a good thing to get me going again..

There was one thing that I thought might add to the thread so Here goes..

I am using an old old grinder , an Enterprise #22 that has to be from the 1930's and belonged to my grandfather..

The stuffer is one that I made 10 year ago or so, and it is interesting. It holds about 5 lb of meat and the total cost was probably less than $10.

Its a 4" i.d. , 1/4" wall plexiglass (cast acrylic) tube, with the mechanicals from an english caulking gun. The white plunger plates are 1/2" HDPE cutting board.

The front end has a PE threaded nipple on it to attach the feed tube to.

It lays on the counter and with one hand you squeeze the trigger on the thing and regulate the feed with the other...I have been routinely doing very small (1#)batches with it. The only waste is the little bit inside of the feed tube...

Getting ready to do a dried saussion sec to test out my drying area...I have a photo darkroom in the basement that stays 65º or less year round at 55-60% RH. Wish me luck, and will report back...(hope I got the Pics downloaded OK)

Bud

gallery_44203_3251_24871.jpg

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The stuffer is one that I made 10 year ago or so, and it is interesting. It holds about 5 lb of meat and the total cost was probably less than $10.

Its a 4" i.d. , 1/4" wall plexiglass (cast acrylic) tube, with the mechanicals from an english caulking gun. The white plunger plates are 1/2" HDPE cutting board.

The front end has a PE threaded nipple on it to attach the feed tube to.

It lays on the counter and with one hand you squeeze the trigger on the thing and regulate the feed with the other...I have been routinely doing very small (1#)batches with it. The only waste is the little bit inside of the feed tube...

Getting ready to do a dried saussion sec to test out my drying area...I have a photo darkroom in the basement that stays 65º or less year round at 55-60% RH. Wish me luck, and will report back...(hope I got the Pics downloaded OK)

Bud

ingenious stuffer, you should market it. though i bet you have a Popeye forearm by the time you've pumped five pounds out.

and make sure you throw that grinder into the freezer the night before you grind.

good luck!

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[

ingenious stuffer, you should market it.  though i bet you have a Popeye forearm by the time you've pumped five pounds out.

No it really quite easy, the mechanisim has a lot of mechanical advantage, Its made for really big tubes of caulking,and yes the grinder takes a lot of time to change temp..

Thanks for the comment, great book!

Bud

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So, I'm going to make some Pate this weekend. I'm planning on making it in 12oz ramekins, and I was thinking of lining it with caul fat. Does anyone know if this will give enough hold that I can pop the finished pates out of the ramekins intact?

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The pate I just did was lined with caul fat. Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really did hold it together. The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle. Upside - it should come out easily. Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

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My take on Pancetta from 'Charcuterie' using a loin and breast of lamb, substituted Rosemary and rainbow peppercorns in the recipe. What else to call it but Lambcetta! :rolleyes:

gallery_45743_3164_112101.jpg

I will let you know how it turns out after drying!

Regards,

Richard

Well here is the finished product, slightly herby, sweet and peppery, fats are smooth and the meat is very tender, not a disapointment in any way!

Thanks again for the inspiration Michael.

gallery_45743_3164_8368.jpg

gallery_45743_3164_44706.jpg

Best Regards from a steamy Jakarta,

Richard


"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"

Nungkysman: Food for the Body and the Soul.

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The pate I just did was lined with caul fat.  Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really  did hold it together.  The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle.  Upside - it should come out easily.  Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

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The pate I just did was lined with caul fat.  Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really  did hold it together.  The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle.  Upside - it should come out easily.  Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

I was planning on a disk of tin foil and pie weights. I guess the question is, should I try to somehow remove the rendered fat before weighting it and cooling it?

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Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

I was planning on a disk of tin foil and pie weights. I guess the question is, should I try to somehow remove the rendered fat before weighting it and cooling it?

When I have done large terrines/pates, I weight it upside down and let the weight of the terrine mold create the pressure against the block or object with which I am "weighting" it against. What happens is the rendered fat drains during the weighting process. It makes for a "cleaner" product.

So in answer, I would advise to drain the rendered fat, but I doubt if you can use my method as you are doing individual ramekins and the weight would be negligeable (sp?). Although, if you really want to try it, my advice would be to use a small can (Tomato paste or sauce?), put a piece of saran wrapped cardboard between it and the terrine(s) and then invert each one onto a sheet pan and cover a few at a time with a pizza stone or some such thing (cutting board with additional cans on top?). I wouldn't advise a brick as they are so small. You refrigerate them inverted overnight. If you are adverse to getting rendered fat on your cans, then just saran wrap them too.

Good luck! :smile:

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Thanks, Doc-G and Michael, I appreciate it.  As with most things, this one follows the saying that "necessity is the mother of invention."  In my case, it's a necessity to find new and interesting things to do with bluefish.  By late August, they will almost literally be jumping into the boat, and while we throw back most of what we catch (50+ fish days aren't uncommon), you still end up with a lot of fillets.

Rubashov, if you have acess to a smoker, bluefish cold smoked over Pecan is absolutely delicious. I used to own a hardwood lumber yard, and one day a customer came in and bought a lot of the low-grade Pecan that I couldn't sell to the cabinetmaking trade (at a steep discount, of course :raz:). At first, I didn't know what he was doing with it, but on his second or third trip, he brought me some smoked blues. Sacre bleu! They were just outstanding. Thereafter, I made him an even better deal on the low grade lumber, just so he'd keep bringing me the smoked blues after they were done :biggrin:.


"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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Rubashov, if you have acess to a smoker, bluefish cold smoked over Pecan is absolutely delicious.  I used to own a hardwood lumber yard, and one day a customer came in and bought a lot of the low-grade Pecan that I couldn't sell to the cabinetmaking trade (at a steep discount, of course :raz:).  At first, I didn't know what he was doing with it, but on his second or third trip, he brought me some smoked blues.  Sacre bleu!  They were just outstanding.  Thereafter, I made him an even better deal on the low grade lumber, just so he'd keep bringing me the smoked blues after they were done :biggrin:.

Cool, that sounds great. I'll have to get my hands on some pecan around here in that case. I usually use hickory when I'm smoking beef, pork, ribs, etc., but I think that would be too harsh for the fish.

-Rob

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In other news, I just hung my bone-in lamb prosciutto and a coppa (solid muscle, no casing) to dry. I'm taking off tomorrow to get married next weekend. By the time I return from the honeymoon in about 3 weeks, I'm hoping there will be some tasty progress on the charcuterie front.

Since it appeared that my bresaola dried a bit quicker on the outside than I would have liked (thus leaving the slight ring on it), I rubbed both pieces liberally with lard before I hung them. Definitely a job for latex gloves! It wasn't pretty, but it got much easier (albeit messier) once the lard warmed up a bit. Then I wrapped them in cheesecloth and hung them up in my curing chamber, which is a mini-fridge.

Of course, the out-of-town approach may be risky, as I won't be here to check the humidity levels and see whether there's any funky green stuff growing anywhere. However, to try to hedge my bets, I wiped down the whole interior of the fridge with a bleach solution just to kill anything that was thinking of messing with my stuff!

I'll report on the results when I get home, hopefully with some good news!

Best,

Rob

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In other news, I just hung my bone-in lamb prosciutto and a coppa (solid muscle, no casing) to dry.  I'm taking off tomorrow to get married next weekend.  By the time I return from the honeymoon in about 3 weeks, I'm hoping there will be some tasty progress on the charcuterie front.

Since it appeared that my bresaola dried a bit quicker on the outside than I would have liked (thus leaving the slight ring on it), I rubbed both pieces liberally with lard before I hung them.  Definitely a job for latex gloves!  It wasn't pretty, but it got much easier (albeit messier) once the lard warmed up a bit.  Then I wrapped them in cheesecloth and hung them up in my curing chamber, which is a mini-fridge.

Of course, the out-of-town approach may be risky, as I won't be here to check the humidity levels and see whether there's any funky green stuff growing anywhere.  However, to try to hedge my bets, I wiped down the whole interior of the fridge with a bleach solution just to kill anything that was thinking of messing with my stuff!

I'll report on the results when I get home, hopefully with some good news!

Best,

Rob

I dunno, sounds a bit risky... Maybe you should come back from your honeymoon sooner ? :laugh:

(congratulations!)


Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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Fortuitous Find of the Weekend: 28oz tomato cans are the perfect size to sit on top of pates in 12oz Ramekins.

I haven't cut into the individual pates yet, but I have sampled the leftover bit that I poached (and I brought that for lunch today).

Recipe: Pate de Campagne from the book, with duck eggs instead of hens eggs.

Notes so far: Reduce the parsley for the next batch. That's about it.

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Dave, the pate will continue to improve with time. I left mine for a week before cutting it, and it was delicious. Two weeks later, when we ate the last scrap, it was 95% as delicious as after a 1 week cure. Let it rest, if you can.

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Dave, the pate will continue to improve with time.  I left mine for a week before cutting it, and it was delicious.  Two weeks later, when we ate the last scrap, it was 95% as delicious as after a 1 week cure.  Let it rest, if you can.

Sounds like grounds for experimentation. One to open up in the next day or so, one when that is done, and I think the other two will go shrink wrapped into the deep freeze for future use.

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