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Fat Guy

Help, I need to buy a real pro shaker

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The two parts fit together. The small tin fits inside the larger tin. One advantage of this design is that you can use the large tin for stirred cocktails if you don't have a separate stirring vessel. You will need a separate strainer.

You might rather use a cobbler shaker, however, which has a built-in strainer. This kind of shaker used to be a bit of a joke in the cocktailian community, but that is before Japanese-style cobbler shakers started making the rounds. Now they are very much au courant. If you are planning on usually making drinks for two, I would recommend the 800ml Usagi Cobbler Shaker. I have too many, according to Mrs. slkinsey many different kinds of cocktail shakers at home, and have found myself most frequently using this one when making drinks around the house.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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I have a crummy old glass-and-metal Libbey set from Target. Has recipes for your parents' favorite cocktails (Tom Collins, Martini, Daiquiri, and uh Bacardi) on the sides. Looks like this, works just fine. Do I have to turn in my eGullet cred card now?


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Only the ones for my enemies.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Champagne for my Real Friends, Shaken Vodka Martinis for my Sham Friends


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I have a crummy old glass-and-metal Libbey set from Target. Has recipes for your parents' favorite cocktails (Tom Collins, Martini, Daiquiri, and uh Bacardi) on the sides. Looks like this, works just fine. Do I have to turn in my eGullet cred card now?

Oh, so that's where you get all of your recipes from...

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I've been found out. Time to go into hiding.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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^^ Kicking myself for not writing "The jigger's up."

Shaker story: When I was competing in the regional final of the Auchentoshan Switch at Clover Club, I was so embarrassed to be seen shaking my Baby's First Boston Shaker by Julie Reiner that I breached cocktail contest decorum and stealthily asked the Clover Club barbacks if I could borrow one of their shakers. I lost. The moral is, invest in a real pro shaker.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Purchase on hold. I think I'll be using a quart jar (after dark, in the privacy of my own home) till I figure out what I am doing.

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I have a crummy old glass-and-metal Libbey set from Target. Has recipes for your parents' favorite cocktails (Tom Collins, Martini, Daiquiri, and uh Bacardi) on the sides. Looks like this, works just fine. Do I have to turn in my eGullet cred card now?

Oh, so that's where you get all of your recipes from...

He uses this:

IMG_3326.jpg

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Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I just received a set of the Koriko tins, and they're solid as hell, but they're also smaller than I expected. Can those who have them comment upon their utility in shaking two drinks at once (something I do quite often)?

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Koriko tins are the usual size for metal tin sets, the large is 28oz and the smaller 18oz.

You can definitely shake two modest size drinks in them, if you need to.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I just received a set of the Koriko tins, and they're solid as hell, but they're also smaller than I expected. Can those who have them comment upon their utility in shaking two drinks at once (something I do quite often)?

I use mine regularly to shake 2 cocktails (6 oz total of ingredients). I really like the way they feel, they are really well made. I have cheapo imitations but they don't even come close. Even though they weight about the same, the weight is not distributed in the same manner (the korikos have a heavy base and thefore are more stable), and the seal is not as good.

[As Erik just wrote] The Koriko tins are 28 & 18 oz. I don't find them small, but based on your previous questions about shaking issues we already established that you must have huge arms & hands!


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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I just received a set of the Koriko tins, and they're solid as hell, but they're also smaller than I expected. Can those who have them comment upon their utility in shaking two drinks at once (something I do quite often)?

I use mine regularly to shake 2 cocktails (6 oz total of ingredients). I really like the way they feel, they are really well made. I have cheapo imitations but they don't even come close. Even though they weight about the same, the weight is not distributed in the same manner (the korikos have a heavy base and thefore are more stable), and the seal is not as good.

[As Erik just wrote] The Koriko tins are 28 & 18 oz. I don't find them small, but based on your previous questions about shaking issues we already established that you must have huge arms & hands!

Cool, good to know about 2 cocktails.

I got some coupes, by the way, and did some more measuring, and found even with ice maker ice, 3.25 comes out to a bit over 4 oz, which sits nicely in the coupe with no spillage from simply handling the glass (unlike the martini glasses).

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I got some coupes, by the way, and did some more measuring, and found even with ice maker ice, 3.25 comes out to a bit over 4 oz, which sits nicely in the coupe with no spillage from simply handling the glass (unlike the martini glasses).

So the spillage had more to do with the shape than the size of the glasses then (as you suspected). Which glasses did you end up buying?

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These: http://www.fishseddy.com/browse.cfm/4,2071.html

What I got is holistically smaller than I expected (still 5.5 oz though), and has the chunkier-than-pictured look of the Libbey coupes, and in fact, the linked product may in fact be the 5.5 oz Libbey Embassy coupe. CK's Leopold coupes look more elegant, but are significantly more expensive, both from a unit and shipping perspective.

And yeah, it was definitely the shape. Even close to the rim, the curved over lip of the coupe keeps the drink inside the glass.

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These: http://www.fishseddy.com/browse.cfm/4,2071.html

What I got is holistically smaller than I expected (still 5.5 oz though), and has the chunkier-than-pictured look of the Libbey coupes, and in fact, the linked product may in fact be the 5.5 oz Libbey Embassy coupe. CK's Leopold coupes look more elegant, but are significantly more expensive, both from a unit and shipping perspective.

And yeah, it was definitely the shape. Even close to the rim, the curved over lip of the coupe keeps the drink inside the glass.

Sidecar carafes are also a huge, huge spill prevention measure. I bought a whole bunch of them at restaurant supply store and it's a gift that keeps on giving.

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Has anybody ordered from Golden Age Bartending?

They have a large selection of shakers at quite good prices, although I have no hands on experience with the cheaper ones.


The Dead Parrot; Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Monkey Shoulder Ultimate Bartender Champions, 2015

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Has anybody ordered from Golden Age Bartending?

They have a large selection of shakers at quite good prices, although I have no hands on experience with the cheaper ones.

They seem to have slightly higher prices than Cocktail Kingdom, and no Usagi. Can anyone say how Usagi compares with the Yukiwa Baron? I hadn't intended to spend close to $100 on a shaker but I have done stranger things.

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The Yukiwa are around the same price, but they have a series of cheaper shakers.

At work I have 500ml AG (similar size and shape to the Usagi) and the 500ml Baron Yukiwa in gangster bling gold, of course.

We all favour the Baron for its narrow shoulders and they seal and separate much more easily. I have small hands, so slimmer design is better for me.

They also hold their gold colour better, with the AG fading.

At home I use the silver and gold band Baron and 360ml AG. The latter is great for single drinks like daiquiris, especially with frozen ice. I think it's too small for bar use.

I have left my Koriko tins at work and we use them for drinks with leaf sediment, egg whites and two drink shakes.


The Dead Parrot; Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Monkey Shoulder Ultimate Bartender Champions, 2015

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