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Sauce for Pork?


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Today, I discovered a tragic gap in my cooking knowledge. I love how sauces add to meat, and so I want to have a few different sauces for each kind of protein, for whenever I have a cut of meat that just needs to be extra delicious. So far I've got a mushroom cream sauce that's wonderful for steak and beef, a beur blanc for white fish and most anything with lemon for salmon and other pink fish, and chicken is just an amazingly forgiving protein, everything from lemon, to spice or curry, to a cream sauce can work with it.

Today, however, I was scrounging supper with a friend, and we only had pork chops, and I realized that, not being a huge pork fan, I had totally neglected to learn any sauces that go with pork, and i couldn't think of a single thing from what we had or had access to that would taste right with it. So, does anybody know a really killer sauce that works with pork?

Edited by ZenTaurus (log)
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*mustering my best Hank Kingsley impression*

Applesauce!

Seriously, though, mustard sauce is a classic accompaniment to pork.

Lately, I've been taking the fond from roast pork and making a roux based gravy. Not rocket science, and, surprisingly, not something you see too much in cookbooks, but I find it pretty 'killer.'

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Slice an onion thinly, core and slice a nice tart-ish (but not too tart, Galas good. Granny Smiths, not so much) apple thinly. Saute them both in butter for about 20 minutes. If you're making a pork roast, do this while it's in the oven. If you're making chops, do it in another saute pan, while the chops are cooking.

Mix some heavy (whipping) cream with some cream Sherry (although dry Sherry will work). You want about 3:1 cream to Sherry. Mix in a hint of Dijon mustard, and S&P to taste, along with a whisper of horseradish (about 1/2 teaspoon to 6 tablespoons of cream...do the math if you're scaling up. And the mustard would be about 1 teaspoon for the basic scale. Again, do the math....) I *always* scale up.........

If you're making a roast, baste the meat with the Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce a couple of times while cooking. If it's a tenderloin, it'll only be once or twice. I've never used this for a full loin or other roast, but I'd imagine if you made a larger quantity of baste, and used it closer to when the meat was done, it'd work just fine.

Take the remaining Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce and add it to the apples and onions. Bring to a boil, then simmer for a bit.

Serve pork with apple-onion cream, and prepare to swoon. Yeah, it's that good.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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For a pork roast or tenderloin.

Its best to brine you pork for 48-72 hours first, but not essential. Its just that after brining you can roast the pork to a lower temperature keeping it moist. It only needs an internal temperature of 135 -140 degrees F.

In any case mix lots of Dijon mustard with finely chopped fresh sage. Spread this mix over the top of the roast.

Roast as above. When done remove the pork to rest scraping off the mustard/sage coating into the roasting pan. De glaze the pan with white wine. Stir well to mix & reduce a bit then add full cream to taste. Reduce some more.

Serve the sauce either over the carved pork or separately.

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I am not much of a sauce maker so I leave the saucing technique to you. Two flavours that are great with pork are cranberry or cherry (sour if available). I'll bet you will find a method for creation on Google but also in eGForums.

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Pork is totally versatile. Sweet and tart fruit sauces are always good -- apple, quince, cranberry, etc. Pineapple is classic. Coconut curry is great for boar, and mint is not just for lamb.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

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I just did this with Pheasant but it's also good with pork or duck breast. I pan seared the meat and removed it, then deglazed the pan with Sherry Vin, a little chicken stock and added Cherry Preserves. Return the meat to coat and reduce the sauce...Watch out for the fumes when you add the Vinegar

tracey

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This won't likely help you this time of year but something to think about late next summer, early fall.

When ground cherries (aka cape gooseberries) are in season I make a sauce with them that I often use with pork. I don't have a recipe but I put them in a sauce pan with a little water and let them cook until they burst (like cranberries) then I add a little sugar and lemon juice.

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Take a look at Adam Perry Lang's book ("Serious Barbecue"). It's BBQ and grill-focused, but there are a whole bunch of interesting sauce and seasoning ideas for pork that have applicability beyond the grill.

John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

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If you've cooked them in a pan, it's really simple. While the chops are resting deglaze with white wine. Add whatever other flavoring you want (a dollop of mustard, herbs, etc). Mount with butter. Adjust seasoning. Done.

 

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I grilled a pork loin last night and made a real simple sauce. I soaked cubed mango in meyer lemon, smoked salt and hot pepper sauce. Like the Mexican street snack. Mashed half the cubes once they were well seasoned to give it some body. Worked great with a vinegar marinade on the pork.

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Slice an onion thinly, core and slice a nice tart-ish (but not too tart, Galas good. Granny Smiths, not so much) apple thinly. Saute them both in butter for about 20 minutes. If you're making a pork roast, do this while it's in the oven. If you're making chops, do it in another saute pan, while the chops are cooking.

Mix some heavy (whipping) cream with some cream Sherry (although dry Sherry will work). You want about 3:1 cream to Sherry. Mix in a hint of Dijon mustard, and S&P to taste, along with a whisper of horseradish (about 1/2 teaspoon to 6 tablespoons of cream...do the math if you're scaling up. And the mustard would be about 1 teaspoon for the basic scale. Again, do the math....) I *always* scale up.........

If you're making a roast, baste the meat with the Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce a couple of times while cooking. If it's a tenderloin, it'll only be once or twice. I've never used this for a full loin or other roast, but I'd imagine if you made a larger quantity of baste, and used it closer to when the meat was done, it'd work just fine.

Take the remaining Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce and add it to the apples and onions. Bring to a boil, then simmer for a bit.

Serve pork with apple-onion cream, and prepare to swoon. Yeah, it's that good.

Instead of regular sherry, you might try using the sherry peppers from these nice folks:

Outerbridge Sherry Peppers from Bermuda

___________________

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Speaking of fruity sauces, I do one with mulato peppers, banana and orange juice, maybe a little cinnamon and oregano, that goes great with grilled loin chops. I only with that the appearance was better- I can never get the color looking better than 'drab'- but when I am by myself and want something different I really like making it.

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

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I sometimes make pork roast in a Roman pot with an onion cut into slices underneath the meat. If the pot is soaked in water as it should be that's all you need. Maybe add a bit of water in it if you like. Some s&p and cumin seeds on the pork and you're ready to go, there's usually a nice (watery) sauce under the meat when it's done. Very Bavarian. Some nice Bavarian potato dumplings and a salad is all you need. For the dumplings you can get a Knorr or similar package if you don't want to make them from scratch. Good stuff!

You can of course thicken the sauce if you like, I usually don't. Put a couple slices of meat on the plate, split open a dumpling (they're abut snowball size) and spoon over some sauce and onions.

Delish!

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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Slice an onion thinly, core and slice a nice tart-ish (but not too tart, Galas good. Granny Smiths, not so much) apple thinly. Saute them both in butter for about 20 minutes. If you're making a pork roast, do this while it's in the oven. If you're making chops, do it in another saute pan, while the chops are cooking.

Mix some heavy (whipping) cream with some cream Sherry (although dry Sherry will work). You want about 3:1 cream to Sherry. Mix in a hint of Dijon mustard, and S&P to taste, along with a whisper of horseradish (about 1/2 teaspoon to 6 tablespoons of cream...do the math if you're scaling up. And the mustard would be about 1 teaspoon for the basic scale. Again, do the math....) I *always* scale up.........

If you're making a roast, baste the meat with the Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce a couple of times while cooking. If it's a tenderloin, it'll only be once or twice. I've never used this for a full loin or other roast, but I'd imagine if you made a larger quantity of baste, and used it closer to when the meat was done, it'd work just fine.

Take the remaining Sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce and add it to the apples and onions. Bring to a boil, then simmer for a bit.

Serve pork with apple-onion cream, and prepare to swoon. Yeah, it's that good.

Instead of regular sherry, you might try using the sherry peppers from these nice folks:

Outerbridge Sherry Peppers from Bermuda

I made this tonight. Fried up some pork chops with a little TexJoy seasoning (my go-to seasoned salt), and then made the sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce. I did shake in some of the Outerbridge Bermuda Sherry Peppers.

Served it over egg noodles.

Fabulous.

Going to be a standard from here on out.

Thank you so much.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I love making pineapple and mango salsa for my pork chops (I just season those with S&P before grilling). The salsa is simply pineapple, mango, red onion, jalapeno, lime juice and a little salt. But the sweet and tart go so well with the pork.

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Last night I made a blackberry and red wine sauce for a pork loin I had. It is pretty easy to make, just saute onions in butter, add blackberries, add wine, bring to a boil and simmer for a while. I added some cinnamon and maple syrup granules to take a bite out of the acidity. Strain through a chinois and serve with a couple whole blackberries.

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.....Serve pork with apple-onion cream, and prepare to swoon. Yeah, it's that good.

I made this tonight. Fried up some pork chops with a little TexJoy seasoning (my go-to seasoned salt), and then made the sherry/cream/mustard/horseradish sauce. I did shake in some of the Outerbridge Bermuda Sherry Peppers.

Served it over egg noodles.

Fabulous.

Going to be a standard from here on out.

Thank you so much.

You are VERY welcome, I'm so glad you enjoyed it. Those flavors do come together magically, don't they?

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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If you have your beurre blanc down, you should consider using the same technique with either Scotch or Bourbon; the result works very well with pork. Note that it takes more Scotch than you might think to get a really flavorful sauce, at least a half cup or so before you cook it down, per stick of butter.

It's not really a sauce but sometimes I slice red cabbage, red onions and a tart apple into a slaw-type mash, and slow cook it with whatever stock is lying around the fridge, a dab of sugar and the better quality of cheap, grocery store balsamic vinegar. Makes a very nice bed for a big chunk of pork. And, it you're feeling really decadent, you can put the Scotch sauce on top.

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