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Corned Beef At Home: Recipes, Tips, etc.

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@gfweb

 

I can't really say.

 

the CB's I get on deep sale  have that little spice packed in the pack which I do not use.

 

I used to use it when the CB's were simmered long ago.

 

Id say the ones I get taste more of Beef than Spice

 

should you SV yours , try a cold smoke for a bit after cooking then re-bag and freeze

 

or eat right then

 

Id say mine taste like lightly smoked beef

 

no spice.

 

next year Im going to do 1/2 of my haul as Ive done this year

 

and the other 1/2  w pastrami like pepper and spices

 

the ' plain smoke ' CB I have is out of this world for sandwiches

 

and not anything I can buy

 

even at the new DD-Wagman's

 

 

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If I bother to use the spice packet at all, I combine it with a tablespoon or so of pickling spice.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Yes, that's ...it Beef, no spice.

SVd at 160 for a day. Nice meat but not CB as I imagine it.

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@gfweb

 

interesting

 

what I made is what I consider to be CB.

 

I grew up in CA and im wondering if there is an Eastern view that sees CB as something close to what Id call pastrami

 

not necessarily great pastrami , but a cow what wandered in that general neighborhood.

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb

 

interesting

 

what I made is what I consider to be CB.

 

I grew up in CA and im wondering if there is an Eastern view that sees CB as something close to what Id call pastrami

 

not necessarily great pastrami , but a cow what wandered in that general neighborhood.

 

Might be true.

 

The Eastern deli CB I've had has some flavor in the pastrami spectrum...not smoked of course...and a somewhat leaner meat.

 

On the other hand, the stuff I made is probably what the Irish would've had for CB, if indeed they had CB at all.  Meant for eating with cabbage and potatoes and not for reuben making


Edited by gfweb (log)

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the Reuben is an interesting taste direction  

 

mine unsmoked is indeed Boston Irish boiled dinner

 

however

 

the lightly smoked CB Ive made would make an award winning Ruben Id say.

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While I was late to get my corned beef done by St. Patrick's Day, I realized that really doesn't make a difference.  I should be making corned beef any time of year.  I'll be making Rueben Sandwiches and Corned Beef Hash with Poached Egg.  One note: The only brisket I could find was in the full brisket size which is a lot more than I wanted to wrangle with.  I took a chance and used a tri-tip.  It had a good layer of top fat so I figured it would work, but I was nervous.  It turned out just as delicious as the corned beef I made in this thread some years back.

Corned Beef at Home.JPG

 

Ingredients-

For the brine-

1 6-8 lb. beef brisket substitute a smaller tri-tip roast

6 cups water

2 12oz. bottles of artisanal ale avoid dark beers like Guinness

1 1/4 cups Kosher salt

1 cup dark brown sugar

1 tbsp. Insta-Cure Pink Salt buy a sodium nitrate pink salt

1/4 cup mixed pickling spices

3 dried red chiles

3 bay leaves

1 tbsp. black peppercorns

1 tbsp. crushed juniper berries

 

For the braising liquid-

The brined and cured corned beef

2 12 oz. bottles of artisanal ale avoid dark beers like Guinness

1 tbsp. black peppercorns

1 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped

1 carrot, peeled and roughly chopped

4 cloves garlic, crushed

water

 

Instructions-

Brining and Corning the Beef-

Pour the water and ale in a large, deep container. Add the Kosher salt, brown sugar, pink salt, pickling spices, dried chiles, bay leaves, black peppercorns and juniper berries. Stir to combine all the brine ingredients.

 

Place the beef in the brine and cover. Place the beef in the fridge and let it cure for 10 days, turning it over every couple of days.

 

Braising the Corned Beef-

Heat the oven to 300. Remove the corned beef from the brine, and discard the brine.

 

In a heavy Dutch oven, pour in the ale, peppercorns, onion, carrot and garlic. Put the corned beef in the pot and add enough cold water to come up about 4" of liquid and 1" from the top of the beef. Cover the Dutch oven and slowly braise in the oven, about 4 hours.

 

Gently remove the corned beef from the Dutch oven and let it cool on a carving board for 15 minutes. Cut the corned beef across the grain and serve.

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I've corned many cuts, brisket, chuck, top round, bavette.  Usually I use a rub rather than a brine. If I'm making it for pastrami it'll be with more spices ( alspice, mustard, garlic) than for Irish corned beef.

 

Cooking for a couple days sous vide tenderizes the cheaper cuts and it comes out great.

 

 

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14 hours ago, gfweb said:

I've corned many cuts, brisket, chuck, top round, bavette.  Usually I use a rub rather than a brine. If I'm making it for pastrami it'll be with more spices ( alspice, mustard, garlic) than for Irish corned beef.

 

Cooking for a couple days sous vide tenderizes the cheaper cuts and it comes out great.

 

 

Thanks for the tips.  A local butcher who has been making corned beef for over 50 years does it with eye of round.  I think these cuts work ust as good as brisket.  Because of the brisket bbq craze in recent years the cost per lb.  has really gone up.  I care more about flavor and tenderness than cost of the meat.  I'll do my pastrami in the next few weeks.  I actually prefer it over corned beef.

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20 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Thanks for the tips.  A local butcher who has been making corned beef for over 50 years does it with eye of round.  I think these cuts work ust as good as brisket.  Because of the brisket bbq craze in recent years the cost per lb.  has really gone up.  I care more about flavor and tenderness than cost of the meat.  I'll do my pastrami in the next few weeks.  I actually prefer it over corned beef.

That's good to know.

One of my local supermarkets frequently has eye of round on for a pretty good price, and I'd actually thought it would be a viable option for corning. Nice to have confirmation. :)


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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2 minutes ago, chromedome said:

That's good to know.

One of my local supermarkets frequently has eye of round on for a pretty good price, and I'd actually thought it would be a viable option for corning. Nice to have confirmation. :)

I started buying eye of round about two years ago for roast beef sandwiches.  I use the really high oven heat method.  Put it in, turn off the oven and then let it cook.  I usually take it out when it registers rare.  It make really delicious roast beef sandwiches.

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2 hours ago, David Ross said:

Thanks for the tips.  A local butcher who has been making corned beef for over 50 years does it with eye of round.  I think these cuts work ust as good as brisket.  Because of the brisket bbq craze in recent years the cost per lb.  has really gone up.  I care more about flavor and tenderness than cost of the meat.  I'll do my pastrami in the next few weeks.  I actually prefer it over corned beef.

I think Dietz and Watson uses round for one of their CB products. 

 

In another thread I mentioned my quick corn of small cuts like bavette. I'll put the rub and cure on it ...pop it into a sv bag and next day I have cooked ready to eat corned beef.  its cured all the way through and tastes right.

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Posted (edited)

@gfweb 

 

"  my quick corn of small cuts like bavette "

 

Im hoping you haven't lost your mind , @gfweb

 

maybe Tartare   ,but corned ?

 

suprise.gif.177a6103eb17509fbcf94566744a1570.gif

 

my mother would have suggested     ' you get your head examined '

 

however , remember , those offices are closed.

 

Id just " Pull a Cork "  or " Twist a Top "

 

if I were you before you do this sort of thing again.

 

drunk.jpeg.927acaae1ad53b21e176b96400a2c217.jpeg

 

Just Saying


Edited by rotuts (log)

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2 hours ago, David Ross said:

I started buying eye of round about two years ago for roast beef sandwiches.  I use the really high oven heat method.  Put it in, turn off the oven and then let it cook.  I usually take it out when it registers rare.  It make really delicious roast beef sandwiches.

I typically buy them for jerky, but the characteristics that make them ideal for that also make them excellent for sandwich-ing. :)


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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30 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I typically buy them for jerky, but the characteristics that make them ideal for that also make them excellent for sandwich-ing. :)

 

In my location eye of round has been pricey for a number of years as Korean  and Vietnamese  population in particular use thin thin slices in hot pots and other dishes. When the kids were learning to cook unsupervised they sometimes picked it up. Less than a minute in the pan and dinner on the table.

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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb 

 

"  my quick corn of small cuts like bavette "

 

Im hoping you haven't lost your mind , @gfweb

 

maybe Tartare   ,but corned ?

 

suprise.gif.177a6103eb17509fbcf94566744a1570.gif

 

my mother would have suggested     ' you get your head examined '

 

however , remember , those offices are closed.

 

Id just " Pull a Cork "  or " Twist a Top "

 

if I were you before you do this sort of thing again.

 

drunk.jpeg.927acaae1ad53b21e176b96400a2c217.jpeg

 

Just Saying

 

 

 

It's a thin strip of meat...it corns fast. Why not?

 

 

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So I got a corned beef brisket from Fresh Direct. A couple of questions:

 

1.  Soak it before cooking?

 

2.  I want to cook it in the slow cooker, but it's bigger than will sit nicely in the slow cooker (as most briskets are). Should it be cut in half?

 

3.  Add my own spices or use the weird little packet that is packed with it?

 

4.  Cook in plain water?

 


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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@weinoo 

 

1 ) no

 

2) no problem cooking it 1/2.

 

3 ) the little packet is , well  little.  the Beef is big  ad your own , just no salt.

 

4 ) the plain water will become salty , thus the Beef less so

 

SV is best  but that's not your plan

 

140 - 142.5  for 48 might some sort of goal for you

 

if not SV

 

then in your oven , w regular delicious NYC water , plain

 

w your chosen whole spices 

 

at the lowest temp of that oven

 

some time ago , it was 140 F   , maybe 160 f now ?

 

then be patient .  if the water slowly evaporates  just add some more of

 

that deviousness.

 

low , slow will get you an outstanding pice of meat

 

pls report back

 

 

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7 minutes ago, rotuts said:

140 - 142.5  for 48 might some sort of goal for you

 

if not SV

 

then in your oven , w regular delicious NYC water , plain

you saw where I said...?

 

2.  I want to cook it in the slow cooker, but it's bigger than will sit nicely in the slow cooker (as most briskets are). Should it be cut in half?

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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6 minutes ago, weinoo said:

you saw where I said...?

 

2.  I want to cook it in the slow cooker, but it's bigger than will sit nicely in the slow cooker (as most briskets are). Should it be cut in half?

 

You could easily halve it.

One advantage of sv is you can use the bag jus to braise cabbage. Tasty that way

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Posted (edited)

I think he meant ok to cut in half. My crock pot must be huge - never an issue. I just do plain water and the packet but I adore garlic so I cut a head in half and toss in. Ni need to soak. It is a salty beast - let the salt/brine flavor the vegetables as well. .I usually just did potato and cabbage; maybe carrots. Nobody would eat turnips but they would be good. 


Edited by heidih (log)
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well , maybe you might want less of the slow cooker than you think

 

but  if the SC is talking to you

 

you must heed the SC

 

it will be tasty 

 

just not as tasty as in the oven

 

but Done is done these days

 

so enjoy

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Just posted on the Dinner thread about my belated slow cooker corned beef.

I never soak my corned beef either. 

As for the little package of spices., if you prefer your own spices, then add your own and get down with your bad self! xD 

There was one time I opened my package of corned beef and couldn't find the usual enclosed spice package. So I thought "How hard can this be?" and added some pickling spices I had on hand. I should have measured better...it ended up tasting like bread & butter sweet pickles! xD

Once the corned beef is done in the slow cooker, I use the cooking water in another pot to boil the potatoes and carrots and the cabbage is done in its own little pot since it would just shred if boiled along with the potatoes and carrots. 

My slow cooker is actually a Westbend brand cooker. The rectangular cooking pot can be removed from the heating "griddle" and used on the stove top, which comes in handy.

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Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

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This is the Reuben Sandwich made with the corned beef I posted earlier.  This batch used a tri-tip.  As good as ever.  Next few weeks I'll move toward pastrami.  For my Reuben I make thousand island dressing, use sauerkraut but no cheese.

 

The Real Reuben Sandwich (1).JPG

 

For the Russian Dressing-makes 1 1/2 cups

3/4 cup mayonnaise

1/3 cup chile sauce substitute cocktail sauce

2 tbsp. sour cream

1 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

1/4 cup mined onion

1 tbsp. dill pickle relish

1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice

2 tsp. horseradish

2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce

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@ShelbyThis is a recipe I used to use to corn Canada geese.  When I was working, one of my employees was an avid hunter.  He brought me big goose breasts, and I'd corn them and then a few weeks later make sandwiches and feed the morning crew corned beef ala goose Reuben's!

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