Jump to content
Forums offline 11pm CDT tonight, 3/23/2019 Read more... ×
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

SobaAddict70

Filipino Food Is Fantastic!

Recommended Posts

One upcoming title in Filipino cooking is "7000 Islands." Description here.

Amazon pre-order here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any of the cookbooks by Nora Daza or Violeta Noriega are pretty much standards (the newest of their books is probably about 20 years old, but the Daza ones are really quite old and have gone through many printings). They're not the best written recipes (or the best quality books in terms of paper and binding), but the end results are pretty much what Filipinos eat. IIRC they're written for a Filipino audience, so some of the ingredients they use are called by their Filipino names. But most should still be available in Canada.

I think I have all all the books written by both, but I can't seem to find them. Probably in storage.


Edited by prasantrin (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's also Kulinarya which is more modern, but still offers traditional recipes. It's for the posh Filipino market.

(Actually, pretty much all Filipino cookbooks not published for the western market (such as those mentioned by others) are for the more posh Filipino market. Regular Filipino folks can't afford to waste money on cookbooks, nor can they afford to buy most of the ingredients mentioned.)

eta: I think my mother gave a copy of this book to Kerry--maybe she'll share it!


Edited by prasantrin (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's also Kulinarya which is more modern, but still offers traditional recipes. It's for the posh Filipino market.

(Actually, pretty much all Filipino cookbooks not published for the western market (such as those mentioned by others) are for the more posh Filipino market. Regular Filipino folks can't afford to waste money on cookbooks, nor can they afford to buy most of the ingredients mentioned.)

eta: I think my mother gave a copy of this book to Kerry--maybe she'll share it!

Thanks for your recommendations. Kerry has lent me the Kulinarya so I will be digging into that this coming week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having lived for several years in the Philippines, I certainly developed a fondness for many of their dishes. Lumpia, of course. Pancit. Adobo. And many others.

I've bought several Filipino cookbooks, but they didn't really "do it" for me, for some reason.

So I've ordered "The Adobo Road," with heightened expectations.

And, just in case, "The Filipino-American Kitchen," too.

I do have a Filipino market & restaurant pretty close to my house, but I'm hopeful that "The Filipino-American Kitchen" will give me substitutes for some ingredients that I've had a difficult time sourcing.

Amazon link Filipino-American Kitchen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?

The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?

The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.

Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calamansi is impossible to find in New York as well!

Well, hey, I'll send you some, too. But I can't believe you can't grow them in pots. Try an Asian nursery, or order one (or two) online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.

They're very easy and fun to grow. They look beautiful and smell even better. Think you'll love having a pot or two. And I'm serious about sending you a box of some fruit. My trees are loaded. They're green now...not sure whether you prefer them green or orange. But if you want some, pm me.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.

I have a suggestion for anyone that doesn't have a spot to grow a potted plant. If you don't have a sunny balcony, or fire-escape, or patio, or other place to keep your potted calamansi in the summer, and a sunny window or "grow light" to keep it in the winter, I think you should consider your friends and family. Surely at least one of them does enjoy growing plants. And if I were you, I'd gift them with a couple of calamansi trees. As I said above, they're beautiful and easy to grow. I'd think your "green thumb" friend or relative will enjoy growing calamansi, and you'll have a ready supply.

My son has done that with Keffir Lime. Although space isn't an issue for him, he can't seem to keep plants alive. But he's a great cook and particularly enjoys Thai recipes. So he bought me a Keffir Lime tree. It's thriving. And he harvests the leaves every time he comes for a visit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?

The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.

Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

Thank you for the offer! While I'm pretty sure they could be imported to Canada (no citrus industry here, so not much worry about bugs and stuff that might destroy our non-existent citrus industry), it's so hot right now I'm not sure they'd survive the trip!

I wonder if I can get a plant here. Our winters are so harsh, though, and I'm not sure it will be warm enough, even indoors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've grown Calamansi and it's one of the easier citrus to grow. I think it has some hardiness and adaptability it it's genes being subjected to all the assaults of insect and tropical conditions of the Philippines. If you can keep it cool - really cool actually, in the 40's or so, in the winter, you don't need really bright light. I've put them in a west window in an unheated room. Make sure they are not waterlogged. Put them out slowly (expose them for ever longer periods of direct light) once it warms up outside. I lost mine to careless under-watering while on a trip. They are actually a bit more hardy than many citrus fruits and can survive frosts better than oranges, even though they are most common in tropical areas, namely the Philippines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In fact, I believe at least one US supplier of the plant (Calmondin, that is, or Calamansi as discussed here) states that it is hardy down to 20ºF (that's 20 degrees Fahrenheit), if I remember correctly.

@patrickamory, if you do try that shop on Mulberry (Asia Market Corp) in NYC to seek out calamansi one day, in addition to the Chinese name I mentioned on the "Dinner" thread you might also try asking for it in Malay - "limau kasturi" or "limau kesturi"- as I seem to remember some folks there speaking Malay some years ago.

(To reiterate, calamansi is not used *just* in Filipino food - it is widely used in SE Asia...Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, etc...alongside other limes like kaffir limes (limau perut, in Malay) or the equivalent of Key Limes (limau nipis, in Malay))


Edited by huiray (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaymes unexpectedly sent me a present of another box of calamansi. I don't think either of the dishes I'm about to show here are orthodox Filipino cuisine, but she asked that I post them in the Filipino thread, so here they are. I will say her calamansi are fantastic, even better this time, and I do like to devour them fresh, rind and all.

Here are the calamansi as they arrived:

calamansi_zps4b2806e2.jpg

Spinach with calamansi dressing and dried shrimp:

spinach_calamansi_zpsc54f380a.jpg

Chicken adobo. I used calamansi juice in place of most of the vinegar usually specified. Marinated overnight. So much fuller and fruitier than adobos I've made in the past using pure vinegar.

adobo_zpsf5d8bacd.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have a calamansi plant grown in a pot for at least 3 years now, have a look at the pic in http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143588-indoor-herb-garden-suggestions/?hl=%2Bcalamansi#entry1935265

as already pointed out earlier, the calamansi is a multi purpose plant, especially when grown indoors, ie it supplies fruit ( much more than i can use or give away), looks fantastic with its shiny green leaves, and lemony fragrance that wafts across the room when in bloom. It is one of the easiest citrus to grow indoors.

i keep all my plants in the living room/office of my apartment, and in winter that is usually kept between 12 to 20 C, no grow lights, they survive like i do. I used to put them out in the balcony in summer, but its too much trouble and for the past 2 years, they are indoors all year.

as for the problems with keeping keffir limes alive, it could be that the plant was grown from seed, or cuttings. . Get a plant that has been grafted on virus resistant stock.


Edited by jsager01 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?

The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.

Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

Thank you for the offer! While I'm pretty sure they could be imported to Canada (no citrus industry here, so not much worry about bugs and stuff that might destroy our non-existent citrus industry), it's so hot right now I'm not sure they'd survive the trip!

I wonder if I can get a plant here. Our winters are so harsh, though, and I'm not sure it will be warm enough, even indoors.

i dont think you need to import, i am quite sure they are available from nurseries in Canada, or quite often in chinese grocery stores around chinese new year, the thing about auspicious golden fruits,etc...at a price.

If you keep them indoors, it does not really matter what the temperature outside is... they will survive at whatever temp you keep yourself alive :-)).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaymes unexpectedly sent me a present of another box of calamansi. I don't think either of the dishes I'm about to show here are orthodox Filipino cuisine, but she asked that I post them in the Filipino thread, so here they are. I will say her calamansi are fantastic, even better this time, and I do like to devour them fresh, rind and all.

Here are the calamansi as they arrived:

calamansi_zps4b2806e2.jpg

Spinach with calamansi dressing and dried shrimp:

spinach_calamansi_zpsc54f380a.jpg

Chicken adobo. I used calamansi juice in place of most of the vinegar usually specified. Marinated overnight. So much fuller and fruitier than adobos I've made in the past using pure vinegar.

adobo_zpsf5d8bacd.jpg

Wow, Patrick. Your adobo looks really wonderful. I don't know how you could get more "orthodox Filipino cuisine" than adobo with some calamansi juice added.

And thanks for posting in the Filipino thread. I do think "Filipino food is Fantastic," and it doesn't get much love here.

Glad you enjoyed the calamansi care packages. My trees are so prolific and, although I do give many away to local friends and family, it's been fun sending some off to the deepest, darkest wilds of NYC.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets all send positive thoughts to the Filippinos that their loved ones are safe and loss of life is minimal.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Hong Kong supermarket" - I assume that is the local place for you? I imagine others will have other sorts of "Asian"/Chinese/East Asian/SE Asian markets accessible to them. I myself have a bag of commercial frozen calamansi juice also, in my freezer, for occasions when I wish to use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets all send positive thoughts to the Filippinos that their loved ones are safe and loss of life is minimal.

So true. Watched the coverage with tears in my eyes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×