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avant-garde

The Alinea Cookbook

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Also, this is a book that should likely sell for a lot more than $50 ... we are all fortunate to get one at that price, whenever it arrives.

I wouldn't be overly surprised if, in Alinea fashion, there was something else included when the pre-orders do arrive based on this comment by Nick Kokonas on the Mosaic:

"The book shops put it out earlier than they were supposed to...

that said, you are getting something a bit different.... :-)"


Marc Lepine

Atelier Restaurant

Ottawa

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Two full days were spent signing the books, re-shrink wrapping them, placing them in the limited edition sleeves, and then shrink wrapping the result. Next week they all ship out to all of you. Thank you for your patience.. I know some book sellers have jumped the gun... but none of them will have this edition.

I don't think we're getting anything surprising, just this special cover and the sigs. As many others have said, a few extra days and paying full price is hardly a concern in comparison to what we'll receive.

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Ordered my copy, and I don't even know where I'll be living next fall.  I may well buy a couple copies, one for the family and a personal copy for myself.

How much is the Alinea cookbook and is can you still get it signed by grant achatz?


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast"

Oscar Wilde

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Thanks for the votes of confidence everyone.

The book stores were supposed to hold them until October 15th. Given the size of the books it doesn't surprise me that they put them out early.

I posted a few pictures in the Mosaic forums of the signing sessions and the sleeved edition. The book is the same book, but we had Grant, Martin, Lara and me sign each and every one of the first 3,500 off the line. Each was then shrink wrapped again and placed in a sleeve. They will ship out on the 8th or so and everyone should have theirs by the 15th.

The Mosaic will get new content at that point as well and we will get out of beta and start more regular updates. It will also be open to the public at that point... just hit the sign up button.

Finally, we will sell sleeved copies that are unsigned of the second edition at $ 75 through our website -- which is already being printed. The cost of the books, shipping, and the sleeves exceeded our projections, so while we can wholesale the book to Amazon and do just fine (and they barely take a mark-up at $ 30), once we add the sleeve we have to increase the price. So early buyers got a deal.

We are fortunate enough to have sold out through our channels the 5,000 books we ordered for our outlets (3,500 of the limited ones + some regular copies for events and the restaurant) and 25,000+ wholesale orders. So we have editions 2 and 3 already ordered.

I completely understand the frustration, if any, by people who ordered early and are getting them after the folks who paid less through retail outlets. If I had to do it again I would have ensured that our supply chain did not get ahead of schedule on the wholesale side. We are right on our schedule -- almost to the day -- and it is a live and learn type situation. That said, you will be getting a copy signed by Grant and the team that created the book....


Edited by nick.kokonas (log)

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Is anyone having difficulty logging in to mosaic?

Yep. Something tells me they may be making some modifications to the Mosaic site and that could be causing an issue with logging in. I know they were supposed to be "opening up" the site as well, so I don't know if that has anything to do with it...

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I got my shipping confirmation email today. (I bought through the site). If only it would be here before this weekend, but I doubt the USPS can get it here in one day.

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Yeah, they posted on the mosaic that all U.S. orders went out yesterday and all international orders would be going out today. Shouldn't be long now (although my last l'epicerie order has been stuck in customs almost a week now so we'll see).


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Anyone going to the Alinea Cookbook release party at Thomas Masters gallery here in Chicago tomorrow? It's a $120.00 a couple including a signed copy of the book, some small bites, and reserve wines. I'm looking forward to it.

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Nice review of the Alinea book by Fabio Parasecoli in the latest issue of The Art of Eating.

While the recipes can hardly become part of your every day cooking, this book is far too interesting to be left on the coffee table.

I remain anxiously awaiting receipt of my copy.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Has anyone outside the US (and possibly Canada) gotten a shipping confirmation email?

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Nice review of the Alinea book by Fabio Parasecoli in the latest issue of The Art of Eating

Is there an online copy somewhere?

I believe that it is print only.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Mine came in the mail just now. And wouldn't you know, the rest of this week I have way too many other things to do to browse!

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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I received mine in the mail yesterday. Despite having a full schedule for the next few days, I justified digging into this by telling myself that, considering the weight of the book, I would not only be educating and entertaining myself, but also working out at the same time. I'll just press it above my head a few times and call it my excercise for the day. :cool:

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The release party held at Thomas Masters Gallery here in Chicago was a great surprise. Guests at any one time was probably 60 to 100 guests plus a number of Alinea chefs and servers including Chef Achatz. There was six food "stations" some direct from the book including Bacon w/ Butterscotch, Apple, and Lime....Foie Gras w/ Spicy Cinnamon Puff, and Apple Candy....Wine Poached Quince w/ Fall Aromas, plus a few others. Louis Roederer champagne was flowing freely the entire evening. Quite a steal for $120.00 a couple including a copy of the book generously signed by the chef however you requested.

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Got mine today. After looking at 'Spring' I was drooling, as my schedule only has only brought me to Chicago (and Alinea) in the Autumn.

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Mine came 2 days ago. It is a gorgeous book and I will read it and treasure it, but I assure you that I will never cook anything from it.

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It is a spectacular piece of work.

The "Ingredients" section is probably the best two page summary of the past few years of texture modification technique I've read.

I feel much less intimidated by this than a certain other giant black book. And I actually may be able to go to this restaurant one day.

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