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What is your most requested recipe?


llc45
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What a great topic! My recipe that is requested time and again is not so much of a recipe as a technique. The origin is that my grandmother had so many big eaters at holiday time that she could not fit enough stuffing in the turkey to satisfy everyone. By way of improvisation, she made additional stuffing and then formed it into "balls" (about the size of small baseballs), put them on a cookie sheet, and baked them in the oven along with the turkey.

The only requirement is that the stuffing must be fairly rich in order to achieve the best result: a succulent ball of bread stuffing that is moist and flavorful on the inside and crispy on the outside. The stuffing balls have become so popular that we no longer stuff the turkey, we just make all the stuffing into stuffing balls. And the next day, you can slice them up and use leftover turkey and cranberry sauce for a very yummy stuffing ball sandwich.

Many of our friends/adopted relatives have added stuffing balls to their family holiday traditions, and there was one friend of my brother's (that I really didn't even know) who used to call me every year, without fail, on Thanksgiving morning to ask me how to make them.

For those of you who are not familiar with traditional bread stuffing for turkey, here's a loose recipe and description of how to make stuffing balls:

1. Take 4-5 loaves of stale assorted bread and cube approx. 3/4". Set aside.

2. Cook 3 lbs. diced onion and 1 large bunch of celery (leaves and all) in 1 lb. of butter over med-low heat until soft. Add S & P to taste, and a strong dose of Bell's seasoning and sage (fresh is best). Off heat, add at least 1 large bunch of fresh parsley, chopped medium fine.

3. Beat 6-8 eggs with 1/2 cup of stock, then add to sauteed veggies.

4. Add the wet mixture to the cubed bread, mixing gently with clean hands. Add additional stock if necessary in order for the bread to be moist enough to stick together. Shape the mixture into balls (larger than a golf ball but smaller than a baseball). Press just firmly enough to hold together. The goal is to form the ball but not compress the bread too much.

5. Place on cookie sheets and bake with turkey for 45 min. to 1 hr. (approx. 325 F) until the inside is cooked and the outside is crispy. Baste with turkey pan drippings occasionally while baking.

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Come the holidays, I'm going to be hunting for several of these 'most requested' recipes. Any chance of getting them into RecipeGullet?

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Most requested recipe from eGullet that my friend's request is AhLeung's Mapo Tofu.

By happy coincidence, that's our family's most-requested dish when Caro is in the kitchen---and it's usually for breakfast!! She comes home from work about dawn, chirpy and wide-eyed, ready to start chopping and sizzling, and when that garlic and ginger hit the hot wok together----!!!

Heaven in a hot pot.

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This thread reminded me of a dip that I used to make all the time, and that was wildly popular. And of a story about "sharing."

I played bridge in those days, and it was my turn to hostess our group. So I made my famous Beer Cheese Dip (which I have posted in this thread: Dips, hot or cold, your favorite...).

It was very well-received and everyone copied the recipe. But one friend grabbed up my recipe card and said, "I'm late for the doctor's office. I want to make this for company tonight, so I'll take it home and copy it at home and bring you back your card tomorrow."

"Tomorrow" came and went, but the card was not returned. So I telephoned her to ask about it. "Oh yes, of course, I'm sorry. I got busy. I'll drop it off later today."

But nothing.

A month or so went by. I called her once or twice more, and ran into her around town a time or two, but she kept stalling me.

Then a lady that I did not know that lived on the other side of town telephoned me to ask me to substitute in her bridge group that she was hostesssing in her home. I said I would and she gave me the directions.

I had never been to her home, or even her neighborhood and didn't know any of the other 11 women.

But there was one familiar thing.

A very tasty beery, cheesy dip.

As the party ended, I approached the hostess.

"Thanks for a wonderful afternoon," I said. "And may I see the recipe for that delicious dip?"

"Sure," she said, handing me the recipe. "Isn't it wonderful?"

Now, I had planned to look over the recipe just to see if the ingredients were the same as mine. But to my utter amazement, it not only was "my recipe," it was my recipe - my exact recipe - my cute little Current recipe card with my handwriting and my beer and cheese and Worsty stains!

"Would you like to copy it?" she asked.

"No. I think I'll just take this one."

And I stuck it in my purse and walked out the door.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My most-asked-for recipe doesn't have a name, or even a recipe, really.  I just marinate some boneless, skinless chicken thighs with garlic, lemon zest and juice, fresh thyme sprigs, and olive oil.  Then, throw them on the grill.  Simple party-pleaser!  If I want to get fancy, I use breast meat cut up and skewered.  :cool:

The family has come to call it "Greek chicken", but I'm not sure how accurate that is...

That sounds simple, delicious and Greek to me! If you really want to put on the dog, give it a side of tzatziki!

My most requested recipe is my "mona's meaty minestrone" soup. It's been passed halfway across the country!

Actually, usually make a walnut/yoghurt sauce. Tangy like tzatziki, but a nice change of pace.

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This thread reminded me of a dip that I used to make all the time, and that was wildly popular.  And of a story about "sharing."....

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Spiro -

Just tried your recipe with chicken breasts that I had in the fridge - Yum!

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The Cook's Illustrated cookie dough-topped fruit cobbler recipe from 1996. This is one of those recipes that everyone likes--the non-foodie folks love it, since it seems like they've only had cobbler topped with Bisquick, and it's tasty enough to please the those of us that are pickier (so it's a big hit not only with me but my Iowa in-laws, too). I've had countless requests to photocopy the recipe. The magazine had a big chart with measurements for all different types of fruit, but I found the peach recipe online here.

The topping's the same for other fruits--it works well with almost any--but you may have to adjust sugar and use whatever (if any) dry spices you might use with a different type of fruit.

Edited by kiliki (log)
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cheddar olives - an old southern hors d'oeuvre.

proportions are roughly 2 cups grated cheddar, 1 cup flour, 1/2 stick of butter, healthy pinch of cayenne, and a large jar of pimento-stuffed olives.

I grate the cheese in my food processor, then add the next 3 ingredients and pulse until it forms a dough.

each olive gets wrapped in dough, covering it completely.

Then you can bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes, or freeze and bake directly from frozen. I always make them while watching TV a week or so before a party. Then reheat in batches.

easy peasy!

The Kitchn

Nina Callaway

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"7-6-5" Grilled pork tenderloin from Fine Cooking.  It's fool proof and delivers moist and juicy meat every time.

Here's the recipe for this pork tenderloin. I have used it a few times and it's pretty reliable although I like to go with a lower temp when I pull my pork tenderloin off the grill so I cut a minute or two off the grilling time.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Ruby Chicken. Will post the recipe when I get a minute. Let's say those in the library who DO NOT cook use this as their Ta-Da dish and all ohhh and ahhhh about it. Recently she asked me for some ideas for an "easy" recipe for a shower for her future daughter-in-law. I threw out a few ideas then said "What about the Ruby Chicken recipe?" NO that is her trump card and doesn't get played....

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Ruby Chicken.  Will post the recipe when I get a minute.  Let's say those in the library who DO NOT cook use this as their Ta-Da dish and all ohhh and ahhhh about it.  Recently she asked me for some ideas for an "easy" recipe for a shower for her future daughter-in-law. I threw out a few ideas then said "What about the Ruby Chicken recipe?"  NO  that is her trump card and doesn't get played....

Ooooh... Sounds wonderful. I'll be watching this space! :rolleyes:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I made those a few times last year. People indeed went crazy for them! In New York we call them Bollitas. I thought they were a Hispanic recipe!!!

I think you are replying to me?

Could be - my family is from Texas so a lot of things are Mexican-influenced. On the otherhand I've known Southern cooks from other states to make them as well.

I wonder which country gave them the name Bollitas?

The Kitchn

Nina Callaway

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Potatoes dauphinoise made with heavy (35-40%) cream, no cheese and garlic :biggrin: of course. For those who ask I tell them it is low in calories for :laugh::laugh: and a version of scalloped potatoes for those interested. Most not familiar with this dish can't figure out there is garlic in and I don't tell.

Stick buns made with yeast dough. If I am in a hurry I cheat and use yeasted pizza dough you can find at the supermarket for the bread base. People go nuts for these and they are so easy to make and make it look like you have spent all day slaving over a hot stove instead of the hour you really spent.

Edited by Soupcon (log)

"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

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Oddly enough, my most requested recipe is for those damned "$250 Neiman Marcus Cookies". You know, the recipe that you received in your email inbox ten years ago with some BS story about mistakenly paying $250 for the recipe? I make them every year in the fall, bring them to work, and wait for the requests to roll in. I don't know if I can post the recipe here but a Google search will turn up what you need right away.

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Oddly enough, my most requested recipe is for those damned "$250 Neiman Marcus Cookies".  You know, the recipe that you received in your email inbox ten years ago with some BS story about mistakenly paying $250 for the recipe?  I make them every year in the fall, bring them to work, and wait for the requests to roll in. 

Already starting to think towards holiday baking. Google search shows the recipe in the story as well as one directly on the NM website in response to story. Which one do you use?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Probaby my no knead focaccia made with red grapes (cut in half) and rosemary.  Recipe is HERE

gallery_20352_3866_424592.jpg

gallery_20352_3866_615649.jpg

gallery_20352_3866_664244.jpg

I have been dying to try this recipe but haven't been able to figure out how to convert the weight measurements to cups. Could not take it anymore so finally went out and bought a scale. All I can say is WOW!

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Men love this. Used frequently to get men to help with disagreeable tasks. Very effective in getting a moving crew together.

My Grandmother called this "Pot Roast", My sister and I call it Wine Roast. Some of my friends call it Sauerbraten.

Can be cook in pressure cooker, on top of stove, covered in oven or my favorite the Crock pot.

Beef roast ( Best when Browned.) (Grandma used rump roast.) (I use chuck)

One cup of apple cider Vinegar (Use the best.)

One cup of red wine (cheap is best, I tell people to use Carlo Rossi Paisano. Different wines different flavor.)

1/4 cup of sugar (dissolve in wine and vinegar)

1 to 2 bay leaves

10 to 15 peppercorns

Cook one hour high and then 8 hours low or till tender.

Makes tons of gravy , thicken with flour and if needed browning agent. (Sometimes I add one can of evaporated milk and ginger snaps.)

Roast best cooled before slicing. Freezes well.

Serve with tons of mashed potatoes.

For oven or stove top and two cups of water.

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I love this thread!

I have the chipolte brisket in my crock pot right now - can't wait to get home to try it!!!!

My most requested dish is probably my lemon bars. And the homemade marshmallows I learned to make on this site.

I love egullet!

Patti Davis

www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

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Well, I tried the chipolte brisket with my new crock pot and didn't realize I couldn't leave it on low for well over 10 hours.

I came home to burnt brisket!! When I tried a bite of the inside, it was still tender but, Boy Howdy, was it spicy!!! LOL.

I will try again next week with less spice and less heat. :blush:

Patti Davis

www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

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Well, I tried the chipolte brisket with my new crock pot and didn't realize I couldn't leave it on low for well over 10 hours.

I came home to burnt brisket!! When I tried a bite of the inside, it was still tender but, Boy Howdy, was it spicy!!! LOL.

I will try again next week with less spice and less heat. :blush:

Uh oh! So sorry it didn't turn out. My crock pot is so old that I think it could probably go 24 hrs without burning the brisket. You'll have to let me know how much chipotle you add to the next one so I can alter the spice in recipe gullet for those that don't lke to much heat. I lowered it a lot compared to what I add for my family. I also find there is a lot of variability in the amount of heat that comes from a can of chipotles, some being very hot and some having almost no heat at all. The only brand I can find where I live now does not have that much heat. Also, if all the liquid boiled away, it would tend to concentrate the spiciness. Good luck on the next one!

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Probaby my no knead focaccia made with red grapes (cut in half) and rosemary.  Recipe is HERE

gallery_20352_3866_424592.jpg

gallery_20352_3866_615649.jpg

gallery_20352_3866_664244.jpg

I have been dying to try this recipe but haven't been able to figure out how to convert the weight measurements to cups. Could not take it anymore so finally went out and bought a scale. All I can say is WOW!

I make something similar and measure by the cup. Not as disciplined in arranging the grapes, however :-) But, boy it's good.

My recipe and pix are here: http://www.cookingdownunder.com/articles/2007/260.htm

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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Well, I tried the chipolte brisket with my new crock pot and didn't realize I couldn't leave it on low for well over 10 hours.

I came home to burnt brisket!! When I tried a bite of the inside, it was still tender but, Boy Howdy, was it spicy!!! LOL.

I will try again next week with less spice and less heat. :blush:

Uh oh! So sorry it didn't turn out. My crock pot is so old that I think it could probably go 24 hrs without burning the brisket. You'll have to let me know how much chipotle you add to the next one so I can alter the spice in recipe gullet for those that don't lke to much heat. I lowered it a lot compared to what I add for my family. I also find there is a lot of variability in the amount of heat that comes from a can of chipotles, some being very hot and some having almost no heat at all. The only brand I can find where I live now does not have that much heat. Also, if all the liquid boiled away, it would tend to concentrate the spiciness. Good luck on the next one!

Reading through the chipotle brisket recipe, what kind of chilli sauce do you recommend? (brand)

Thanks!

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