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Found 958 results

  1. I'm surprised no-one has started a thread on this as yet, so here goes. There is a very new web site (so new it's still in Beta) that you can enter your cookbooks into to create an on-line bookshelf. This is the slow and tedious part of the process (particularly if you have as many cookbooks as I do). What comes next is the neat part. A lot of books have been indexed, with all the recipes and their respective ingredients. Want to search through your books for a recipe using lobster and vanilla? Enter the ingredients into the advanced search engine and up pops all of the recipes from indexed books in your own library that contain these two ingredients. They also give the rest of the ingredients and allow you to add these to your shopping list, which is categorised by type of produce so you can order your shopping around the store. I'm not sure how many books have been indexed so far and not all of my books were on there but I do know that from today I have indexed 176 cookbooks and can search through 12,022 recipes. No more simply going to old standby cookbooks. I'm sure I'll get more use out of my library as a cooking resource using this website. The web site is called eat your books. At present the site is in beta but is accepting subscriptions (current price is $25 per annum or $50 as a limited offer for lifetime membership). It's an idea that I wish I'd thought of but am really pleased to be able to use.
  2. The cooking with Modernist Cuisine at Home topic seems to have mostly run its course as many of us have had the book for quite a while. One thing I like a lot about the book is that it presents ideas for variations along with the recipes and presents many variations of ways of achieving similar results. So my motivation for this topic is to have a place to talk about our experiments in modifying the recipes - successful or not. You see I have difficulty following instructions... To start, is serendipity with this post in the sous vide thread asking about using bag juice that came out right as I finished up an experiment with the red wine glaze. The experiment was motivated by a mistake where I made SV short ribs at too high a temperature a while back. The meat was not very good but juice was wonderful. So instead of frying up a bunch of ground beef, I took a half kilo of relatively lean stewing beef and bunged it in the SV at 88 C for an hour. At the end of that time the meat was dry and the bag full of meat juice. The juice was very clear and light in colour with little in the way of 'gunk'. I added it to the wine and veg, started reducing, then strained the veg out and reduced the rest of the way. I skipped pressure cooking the knucklebones (I'm not sure why the recipe has you reduce the wine, then add water to pressure cook the bones, why not cook the bones in the wine then reduce?) To cut to the chase, I was quite happy with the result. I don't agree with the 'fat is flavour' mantra and the only fat in this was the little that rendered out of the meat in the SV. I might try adding a little gelatin for mouth feel and to make the glaze with less reduction. ... and the dog was happy with the dried out meat for his tea-time.
  3. THE BOOKS ARE SOLD I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale. The books are in great shape! There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop. Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below). I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO. Let me know if interested or if you have questions
  4. I love old cookbooks. They’re sort of like the next best thing to a time machine. There are some really interesting cultural clues in the old ones. The recipes from, say, the WWII era and the post-WWII era help those of us who weren’t around to understand what a lot of life was about. And the more adventurous old cookbooks are so cute. Despite our ideas of our americanized forebears being strictly meat-and-potatoes folk, some of the most interesting cookbooks encourage housewives to try new foods. My favorite old cookbooks (at least of those in my possession) are **Meatless Meals, 1943, geared at helping housewives deal with meat rationing. Its recipes include Sauerkraut Fritters, Succotash and Mushroom Thermidor, and Spaghetti Rarebit. **50 Dishes from Overseas, 1944. This one has dishes organized by country and by ingredient. Chapters include “Gooseberry Novelties from Brittany,” “New Zealand Beetroot Dishes,” “South African Ways with Steak,” and “Tennis Sundaes from Africa.” Every third recipe begins some sort of appeal to take the recipe seriously, like “veal tongue prepared in the Viennese way needs trying to be appreciated. It will be liked once tried.” **And the piece d’ resistance, The Housekeeper Cook Book, published in 1894 by the New England Furniture and Carpet Co. This large and decrepit book has many dozen pie recipes, at least 10 recipes for homemade root beer, a whole chapter on ginger breads, and detailed instructions for how to a) boil coffee and b) care for an invalid. It also has a three-meal menu for every day of the year. If you’re curious about what today’s menu would have been 109 years ago, here it is: Breakfast: Pancakes, maple syrup, fried potatoes, venison steak, celery. Dinner: Whitesoup [sic], baked trout, baked potatoes, stewed tomatoes, corn, blueberry pie, apples. Supper: Butter toast, dried beef, hot biscuit, honey. (Can’t wait until the 15th – breakfast is something called “California breakfast food”!) What is it about these old gems that’s so fascinating? Do you have a favorite cookbook, or recipe from an old cookbook? (edited for editing)
  5. I've been perusing the Cookbooks & References topics from years past and didn't see anything on German Cooking. What are your favorites? BTW, any mention of German food leads me into my story of being 18 and in Bavaria for the first time. I refused to translate menus since I eat anything, and after 10 days of eating way too much meat, when I sat at a certain restaurant and saw "Wurst Salat" I was overjoyed at the chance to get a salad with a bit of meat on top. What came to my table 30 minutes later was a massive bowl of shredded bologna marinated in some dressing. No ruffage at all - none! Mmmmm...I ate 3 bites and was done. Now back to the books!
  6. I have no idea why they blurred the name.. so i really would love to know the name of this cookbook. Has anyone seen it? (I think it’s in French.) Thanks!
  7. Good day eG peoples! I am going to purchase a copy of Larousse Gastronomique (English, because I cannot speak French as well as most French toddlers), and I am wondering which version you think is better and why? Let your opinions fly freely...hold nothing back!
  8. A few weeks ago I bought a copy of this cookbook which is a best-selling spin off from the highly successful television series by China Central Television - A Bite of China as discussed on this thread. . The book was published in August 2013 and is by Chen Zhitian (陈志田 - chén zhì tián). It is only available in Chinese (so far). There are a number of books related to the television series but this is the only one which seems to be legitimate. It certainly has the high production standards of the television show. Beautifully photographed and with (relatively) clear details in the recipes. Here is a sample page. Unlike in most western cookbooks, recipes are not listed by main ingredient. They are set out in six vaguely defined chapters. So, if you are looking for a duck dish, for example, you'll have to go through the whole contents list. I've never seen an index in any Chinese book on any subject. In order to demonstrate the breadth of recipes in the book and perhaps to be of interest to forum members who want to know what is in a popular Chinese recipe book, I have sort of translated the contents list - 187 recipes. This is always problematic. Very often Chinese dishes are very cryptically named. This list contains some literal translations. For some dishes I have totally ignored the given name and given a brief description instead. Any Chinese in the list refers to place names. Some dishes I have left with literal translations of their cryptic names, just for amusement value. I am not happy with some of the "translations" and will work on improving them. I am also certain there are errors in there, too. Back in 2008, the Chinese government issued a list of official dish translations for the Beijing Olympics. It is full of weird translations and total errors, too. Interestingly, few of the dishes in the book are on that list. Anyway, for what it is worth, the book's content list is here (Word document) or here (PDF file). If anyone is interested in more information on a dish, please ask. For copyright reasons, I can't reproduce the dishes here exactly, but can certainly describe them. Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme. I'm not one to slavishly follow instructions, but saying "enough meat" in a recipe is not very helpful. This book gives details (by weight) for the main ingredients, but goes vague on most condiments. For example, the first dish (Dezhou Braised Chicken), calls for precisely 1500g of chicken, 50g dried mushroom, 20g sliced ginger and 10g of scallion. It then lists cassia bark, caoguo, unspecified herbs, Chinese cardamom, fennel seed, star anise, salt, sodium bicarbonate and cooking wine without suggesting any quantities. It then goes back to ask for 35g of maltose syrup, a soupçon of cloves, and "the correct quantity" of soy sauce. Cooking instructions can be equally vague. "Cook until cooked". A Bite of China - 舌尖上的中国- ISBN 978-7-5113-3940-9
  9. Any idea what is the best book for me? I am starting to love cooking, I just got great recipe of sauces from this book "Restaurant Style Barbecue Sauce Recipes" all I need is the proper technique for grilling. Thanks
  10. With Modernist Cuisine I waited a couple of years and ended up with a copy from the 6th printing run the advantage of this was that all errors picked up in the erratta had been corrected in the print copy. I am looking to get modernist bread soon and wondered if someone had purchased it recently to check or if someone knew of hand if they have printed any additional corrected runs
  11. I know that there were similar threads, but I'm mostly interested in what kind of software or apps do you use for storing different kinds of recipes. For example, for most text and image based recipes I (like most people here) use Evernote. The notebooks-style organization works well, especially once you start using the Evernote Web Clipper. My browser (Citrio) can download videos, so video recipes are downloaded directly to the OneDrive folder on my PC and synced with the cloud. Very convenient, actually. At last, I'm currently testing the Asparagus android app. I might eventually move from Evernote to this one as it's more convenient for the quick references (though has no web clipper). What do you use for text, images and video recipes?
  12. we're all used to the Wednesday/Sunday food sections of newspapers far and wide, national and local. I see corrections in the local or regional columns when called for, but there's never a way to critique the ones published on a national scale because the content is behind a paywall. I get the WSJ, but don't want to pay additional (I should get access to it all on line for free-the newspaper is not cheap) for their online edition. Very frustrating to try a recipe and have major problems with it and not be able to point out some serious issues. Specifically, the WSJ published a recipe from Dee Retalli, a pastry chef in London who's recipe is in the cookbook 'Rustic' by Jorge Fernandez and Rich Wells. I have made this cake 3 times. First time was a total runover disaster, which I should have foreseen. This cakes calls for a 10" springform or if you don't have that, a 10" cast iron skillet. I went for the latter because that is what I had. Almond mixtures tend to really smoke when they run over, just so you know. Tried again later with a deeper than normal 9 " springform. Happened again. Think it has to do with the 2 teaspoons of baking powder and quick activation in a 350º oven. Invested in a 10" springform for '3rd times a charm' try. I was successful, but not because I followed the directions, rather I became a little obsessed with making this work. Checked my oven, followed with the recipe and eyed it warily. It came up to the brim...and stayed. 45 minutes later it was supposed to be done but while it was beautiful, it was a bowl of jello in the center. It was also browning at an alarming rate- the almond flour again? So I placed a sheet of tinfoil over it (beautiful top crust) and turned the oven down to 325º and carefully watched and tested for almost another hour. That's a big time difference. I found the recipe on cooked.com - credited to the above authors and cookbook albeit in Euro style measures and temps. All seems the same, so what are the odds that the recipe was misprinted twice from 2 different media? All I can think of is somewhere down the line (in the cookbook itself?) the cook time and temp were off. The time on both reads 45 min. The recipe took at least 1hr and 45 minutes. methinks someone left out the hour... The temp. thing is a little more obvious. Celcius to farenheight 350ºF does not equal 180ºC, more like 176ºC. Over almost 2 hours, I think that could make the difference between cooked and burnt? Sooo, I turned it down when I saw how fast it was browning to 325. The cake stays in form while you pour the honey over it, then orange water, then 2(!!!) cups of sliced toasted almonds. I put 1 cup and there is no way another cup would have stayed on that cake. I cup settled up to almost an inch on a 10" cake... Has anyone else tried this recipe or have the cookbook? It's a wonderful cake if you correct the time and temp., But I'd be really curious to see if anyone followed it exactly as written with success?
  13. Due to a miscalculation of my own cooking ability I was left with a kilo of masa harina and some fresh yeast after the weekends Mexican cooking. So I combined the two. I made a fairly straight forward hearth cake mix then cooked in very slowly on on side until the bottom was brown and very crisp, while the top was soft, but cooked though. This was then filled with some bean chile that I made. Thus: OK, it was very good and with a bit of refinement it could be even better, but my question is, is this type of yeast cooking done in the Mexican kitchen (if so recipes or descriptions) or have I invented the fluffy taco?
  14. Inspired by the current recipe preferences thread, I got to thinking about recipe style guides. All of the newspapers I know of have style guides, and I can't imagine that they don't exist for recipes as well. If you have experience with these, can you share some insights about them? What guidelines are you given? Do they differ from magazine to magazine, publisher to publisher? Do they crimp your style, or keep you on the straight and narrow?
  15. Having read the thread with the Q&A session with Sam Mason, I got to wondering about what subjects in the baking and pastry arts is most lacking when it comes to books. ( and also about who I would like to see a book from ) In recent months I have read about the following PC's plans to write books, hopefully to be out sooner than later: Pichet Ong ( formerly of Spice Market in NYC ) Patrick Coston ( now Exec PC at the Ritz Carlton Las Vegas ) Kate Zuckerman ( PAD Top 10 winner, PC at Chanterelle in NYC ) Johnny Iuzzini ( Jean Georges PC ) Sherry Yard ( PC at Spago - a 2nd book for her ) I am looking forward to Coston's book, as I am a fan of his style, beginning from when he was in LV for the 1st time, at Picasso in the Bellagio. As far as subjects, I would love to see an AFFORDABLE book(s) on chocolate and sugar showpieces. ( The only ones I see recently cost more than $100 ). Also would like to see more books on Entrements ( for professionals that is - books on cakes for home cooks are easy to come by ). As far as for books by people, a book by Jean-Philippe Maury of the Bellagio ( on any subject ) would be a must have for me. My biggest problem ( besides having a list of books that cost $1,500 total ) is that I am very weary of buying a book that I can't browse through ( like from JB Prince or CHIPS BOOK ). I own many books but only go to a few for inspirations, so buying a book " blind" that could basically contain stuff that may be of very little use to me, plus cost so much, is very undaunting to me. So, who or what would you like to see written by or about? Jason
  16. Hi Sara -- thanks for joining us this week and giving us your insights into your career and food world. I've been anticipating your Spotlight for a very long time. In terms of the outside sources by which you draw inspiration, what are some of your favorite cookbooks on your shelves? And which do you find yourself turning to most often? What has the most sentimental value to you?
  17. Hi , I'm always somewhat hesitant to prepare schezuan dishes since the recipes I seem to find rarely lead me to results that replicate what I get at a good restaurant. However, both me and my husband are very fond of schezuan cooking and would love to prepare our favorite food at home. Does anyone know of a good book that might be able to help me get started? thanks in advance, w@w
  18. Hi all, I was wondering if I could enlist you for some help. I returned to Montreal 2 years ago after a long absence and I 'm really loving the food and restaurants here-- o.k. maybe not so much the mexican or some of the take out chinese, but who's counting? I digress. So what I was wondering was if I could get some cookbook reccomendations for quebecios chefs. They can be in french, that's no problem. And since I happily cook meat for others, but I am not a huge fan of meat/ poultry and am alergic to seafood, I'm looking for books that are not too heavy on animal protein. I'm not looking for a vegetarian cookbook, but am trying to avoid books that are 75% meat and seafood recipes (this is what I encountered with Daniel Vezina's books). Right now I don't have too much to rely on other than a la Distasio, which I watch pretty regularily. Seems like a lot of her guests are celebrities, and not chefs though. Having recieved her book as an xmas gift, I will say that it's a good reference book for timing oven roasted vegetables and has some quick ideas for busy cooks, but I don't find myself running to it to try something different. I should also mention that I am not really a fan of Jamie Oliverish books either, which maybe part of my problem with distasio. I like recipes that are dead on (as in Alain Ducasse dead on). I hate books that don't give specific quanties or use vague terms like add x ingredient to taste. (I know quite well what my taste is and I buy books in order to NOT make things to my taste). Thanks in advance, chantal
  19. I'm asked about this all the time. I mean ALL the time by English and French speakers. (As if I'm reading Julia Childs or something. ) I have no idea what to recommend. I understand that English is lingua franca here, but I also need some French language books. Help!
  20. Greetings, I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly.
  21. We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also. I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
  22. I got Food52 Genius Recipes a couple weeks ago, and this is the first thing I've cooked from the print version... Marie-Hélène’s Apple Cake Dorie Greenspan Available here I think this recipe actually appears in Around my French Table, too. It's an excellent apple cake, particularly interesting in that it doesn't have any spices in it. It is dense with apples, with just enough cake batter to hold everything together. Aesthetically it's a challenge to slice when it's warm, so I suggest letting it cool, then slicing, then reheating if you want it warm.
  23. Slate article Marvelous article on the history leading up to today and describing some of the ways in which Gourmet Magazine has evolved. What a great read! And the cookbook is something I will definitely look at with an eye toward purchasing!
  24. The Dec. 20 edition of Hanamaru Market (Japanese only) featured vacuum cooking with a rice cooker with a keep warm function. I think I'll try this method to make roast beef as one of New Year dishes (osechi) and report on the outcome. In the meantime, anyone interested is encouraged to try this method before I do. The following are rough translations of two of the recipes presented in the TV show: 1. The simplest recipe: Ingredients: 200 g chicken Salt and pepper 1. Rinse chicken with water (or with sake (Japanese rice wine) to get rid of the smell). 2. Drain and cut into manageable chunks, then season with salt and pepper. 3. Put them in a Ziploc bag, put a straw in, and seal the bag. Suck air out of the bag. Remove the straw, taking care not to let air in, and seal the bag. 4. Put 2 cups (i.e., 400 cc) of hot water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade (140 to 158 deg. Fahrenheit) in the rice cooker and put the bag in. 5. Put the lid on, press the keep warm button to heat for 50 minutes. 2. Roast beef Ingredients for 2 servings 200 g beef Black pepper Salt 1/2 clove garlic 1. Sprinkle salt and pepper on beef. 2. Put the beef in a Ziploc bag and add garlic. 3. Suck air out with a straw. 4. Put water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade in the rice cooker, put the bag, and press the keep warm button. 5) Leave it for 40 to 50 minutes.
  25. Monica, Any suggestions on how I should work with your book? What do you think is best way of reading it, cooking with it? Do you have favorite recipes?
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