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Found 568 results

  1. Tataki Kyuuri no Shouga-zuke ( Cucumber pickles with Ginger) Serves 4 as Side. These are a simple cucumber pickle that only need a couple minutes to marinate. Tataki is from the verb to hit or strike and they are called this because the cucumbers (kyuuri) are slightly smashed before marinating in the ginger (shouga) dressing. Try to use Japanese cucumbers if possible, if they are not available then use seedless ones. 3 Japanese cucmbers 1 T grated ginger 1/2 T rice vinegar 3 T soy sauce large pinch of sugar 1. Cut the cucumbers lengthwise into quarters, then cut them in 2 to 3 inch lengths. 2. Place them into a ziploc bag and slightly crush them with the bottom of a pan, you don't want to smash them to a pulp rather you want to just open them up a little so they can marinate faster. Some will be broken. 3 Add the rest of the ingredients to the bag and masssage it gently to mix the ingredients. 4. Let it sit for about 5 minutes then serve. Keywords: Appetizer, Japanese, Side, Vegan, Easy ( RG1041 )
  2. Rachellindsay

    Christine Ferber's chestnut & vanilla jam

    I have just started to make Christine Ferber's chestnut and vanilla jam. I have halved the quantities she suggested and have followed her instructions which were to put the peeled chestnuts, water, sugar and vanilla pod in a pan, bring to the boil and cook for 15 minutes, strirring gently. The next stage is for it to sit in a ceramic bowl overnight. This is the stage I am at. My mixture went solid the minute I put it in the bowl. The sugar is now quite hard and I suspect that I had the heat too high when I cooked it for the 15 minutes. I have two questions. 1. Ought I have cooked it for a shorter period given that I had halved the quantity of the ingredients, and if so, how long should I have cooked it for? 2. Is there anything I can do now to save it? My fingers are still sore from peeling the chestnuts and I am really reluctant to put it in the bin if anyone can suggest anything. The quantities I used were: 400g peeled chestnuts 400g sugar 200ml water vanilla pod Thanks for any advice.
  3. Vikas Khanna

    Mango Chutney with Ginger and Garlic

    Mango Chutney with Ginger and Garlic Serves 2 as Side. Mango Chutney is become one of the favorite condiment in Indian restaurants all over U.S. Now you can make this chutney with this simple recipe and also create your own versions by adding your favorite ingredients. 6 firm half-ripe mangoes, peeled and thinly sliced 1 c cider vinegar 1 c packed light brown sugar 2 T minced garlic 1 2-inch fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1 T cayenne pepper salt and freshly ground pepper In a large skillet bring all the ingredients to boil, over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low, simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring constantly from sticking to the bottom of the skillet. Remove from heat and let the chutney cool before serving. Always keep it refrigerated. Keywords: Side, Fruit, Easy, Condiment, Indian ( RG1240 )
  4. I'm planning a bbq in a couple of weeks where I'll be serving homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream along with some sort of ginger cookies. I'm trying to think of a tasty and unique way to incorporate Sriracha in maybe a caramel sauce, or a candied nut...something of that nature that can go over the ice cream. Any ideas or experience with this?
  5. cooksandcapers

    Chutney Making

    Hello all, my first post. I have been picking up loads of tips from the forums over the past couple of months, it’s a great site. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on why chutneys are made in the way that they are, ie chop, add sugar, add vinegar… heat, stir lots and wait ages?? We have recently done a big batch of this one (about 15 times the recipe) http://redskitchendiaries.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/weekend-project-ale-chutney/ We have been thinking about how we might cut down on time and energy costs by taking a different route, and of course getting a quality product at the end. My understanding of preserving in this way is that you need to: 1. Stop enzyme/bacterial activity, this is done quite quickly with heat 2. Get to a pH of 4.5 or below 3. Introduce enough sugar so that the amount of available water for pathogens is decreased to an acceptable level, (which I think is a fair interpretation of water activity) Does anyone know why you need to stand over a stove for hours to reduce the liquid, why can’t you cook the veg to the point you want it, then separate the liquid, reduce to a good consistency and pot as normal? Any views would be greatly appreciated Rich
  6. Chevre & Apple Chutney Roll Serves 8 as Appetizer. The chutney part of the recipe (adapted from a recipe in a November 1996 “Bon Appétit” magazine) makes approximately 3 cups of chutney which is more than is needed for the roll. However, the chutney is excellent as a condiment and we never have a difficult time using up the "extra". The chutney is best if made at least one day before using so the flavors can mellow. Use golden raisins for a light-colored chutney and dark raisins for a dark chutney. Also, other dried fruits (prunes, apricots, etc.) can be substituted for the raisins as variations to the basic recipe. Chutney 1-1/2 c apple cider vinegar 2 c sugar 1-1/2 lb tart apples, peeled, cored, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces 10 large garlic cloves, minced 2 oz fresh ginger, peeled, minced 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp dried crushed red pepper 1-1/2 c (packed) raisins, coarsely chopped 2 T yellow or brown (or a mixture of the two) mustard seeds Roll 12 oz chevre, at room temperature 1/2 c apple chutney (from above), cooled or chilled Bring the vinegar and sugar to a boil in a saucepan, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and stir. Mix in the remaining chutney ingredients (but not the chevre!). Simmer until the apples are tender and the chutney thickens, stirring occasionally while it cooks. 45-60 minutes. Cool chutney and chill until used. Pat the softened chevre onto a sheet of plastic wrap in a rough rectangular shape. Cover with another sheet of plastic wrap and roll (or pat) into a 1/4"-thick rectangle. Peel off the top sheet of plastic and spread the chevre with a thin layer of chutney. Use the bottom sheet of plastic wrap to help roll the chutney covered chevre, along the long side of the rectangle, into a tight roll. Or, you can line a small loaf pan or other mold with plastic wrap and spread alternating layers of chevre and chutney inside the mold, packing each layer firmly,starting and ending with chevre. Unmold onto a serving plate and peel off the plastic. Chill if not serving immediately (roll can be made up to one day beforehand) and bring to room temperature before serving with crackers or bread. Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Vegetarian, Condiment, Appetizer, Easy, Cheese, Snack ( RG1046 )
  7. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  8. Tamarind chutney (Imlee kee chutney) Tamarind makes a sweet and sour chutney with the consistency of hot fudge sauce. It's an important element in the street- and snack-foods of northern India. Suvir Saran 1 T canola oil 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp ground ginger 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1/2 tsp fennel seeds 1/2 tsp asafetida 1/2 tsp garam masala 2 c water 1-1/4 c sugar 3 T tamarind concentrate Combine the oil and the spices in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat and cook, stirring, 1 minute Add the water, the sugar and the tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, turn the heat down and simmer until it turns a chocolaty brown color and is thick enough to coat the back of the spoon, 20 to 30 minutes. (While still warm, it will look like a thin chocolate sauce and it will thicken a bit as it cools.) Makes about 1 1/4 cups. Keywords: Easy, Condiment, Indian, The Daily Gullet ( RG181 )
  9. jayashreetrao

    Raw Tomato Chutney

    Raw tomatoes are available in plenty these days.This chutney is ideal as an accompaniment for chapathis or rotis and can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator.the ingredients needed are: raw tomatoes -1/2kg, sesame seeds- 1 1/2 tbsp, green chillies- 4 or 5, salt and curry leaves.For the seasoning:oil ,mustard seeds,turmeric powder and asafoetida. Wash and cut the tomatoes into pieces and keep aside. Roast the sesame seeds till light brown in colour and keep aside.Heat oil in a kadai and at first roast the green chillies and curry leaves and keep aside.Then add tomatoes to it and let cook till tender.When cooked allow to cool and grind all the ingredients together with a little salt.The chutney is ready Add the seasoning and serve.
  10. LindyCat

    Spirit Jams

    No, I don't mean ghostly apparitions on the toast of Christmas Past. I have a recipe for a red-wine jam (red zin or merlot work well) that is absolutely out of this world on a loaf of fresh, nutty wheat bread, and wondered if anyone had encountered such a thing for other alcohols. Now that it is far too close to Christmas to make such a thing, I thought a trio of "grown-up" jam would make a great present for any of those people you can't ever seem to buy for. Office folks and the like. I can't think of what might work well, though, perhaps addding a spirit to a juice to make something like rum-passionfruit jelly?
  11. foodie52

    Homemade Chutney

    Made lamb curry the other night, using Jaz's recipe. After seeing the price of Major Grey's chutney, I decided to make my own : bought about $8 worth of mangos, some golden raisins and spices. I made over a quart for about $10. And it was really , really easy and tasted great! Anyone else make chutney regularly, and if so, what kinds?
  12. achevres

    Cinco de Mayo appetizer

    I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  13. First this is a general inquiry about high quality good tasting dark chocolate in UK for eating. We know about Green and Black's which is made in Italy. Second, have you heard, or do you have web site for James Chocolate , Evercreech, Somerset, BA 4 6LQ. They have some wonderful tasting chocolates with rose, lavender, etc that someone gave us but they do not remember where they got it.
  14. I picked up some cooked squid from a local Korean market. It said it was boiled. One squid was packaged and came in at just under a pound. It was sliced in 1/4 inch rings and the tentacles were packed as well (almost like small octopi legs) It was firm but not overly chewy. The sauce in the small container packed alongside was the standard hot pepper paste with added sugar and sesame oil - very thick and sweet. If this is a standard item, how is it served? It seems like a great snack with cocktails. I have been eating it cold or letting it come to room temp. It is chewy enough that I can't really wrap it in shiso with rice. Thanks for any input.
  15. Rachel Perlow

    Honey Fig Jam

    Honey Fig Jam 1 pt figs 1 c honey 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp all spice 1/4 tsp salt 1 tsp ginger, freshly grated 1 lemon or small orange, finely grated zest and juice Wash, remove the stem and blossom end of figs, cut in quarters. Put in heavy bottomed pot with the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 1 hour. Remove lid, remove figs with a spoon to a food mill fitted with large holed disk. Pass fruit through back into pot, discard skin left in the food mill. Stir pulp into liquid. Simmer for another 10 minutes or so then place into clean jar and store in the fridge. Yields about 1 cup. Keywords: Fruit, Dessert, Vegetarian, Intermediate, Breakfast, Topping/Frosting ( RG1156 )
  16. Just read that marco pierre white doesn't think that jaime oliver is a "real" chef because he hasn't earned any michelen stars. I think it's crap, but maybe I'm wrong. What does is it take to be a "chef"?
  17. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  18. Sorry to lower the tone, but did anyone catch his TV show last night? Christ is there no end to this mans philanthropy, when he dies they should canonise him at least. Anyway the basis is, Jamie is going to give one of his 'downtrodden, disadvantaged and desolate' trainees the chance to run their own restaurant. So four trainees have to battle it out to see who wins etc etc. Of course the purpose of this venture is not to promote his ever expanding empire and do-gooder image, but to give some poor soul the chance to be happy, successful and a whole person. However a few questions/ points: 1. These 'disadvantaged ' individuals did not seem that bad to me. Ok one had stole a car twice, one had overdone it on the gak, one came from Thailand and the other was an Irish lad ( being Irish seemingly his criteria for disadvantagedness) Hardly the Asbo generation? 2. Prior to his 15 project was it really so hard to become a chef? He kept claiming last night how much he had changed these 'kids' lives by giving them a chance to become a chef! 3. Why did he feel the need to step up the swearing ala Gordon Ramsey? Come on Jamie not really the image you want to portray. Even Ruth Watson was swearing. 4. Who the fuck is Ruth Watson? 5. Why did he feel the need to show his vast fortune of? Driver, mansion, lavish birthday celebrations etc etc? Was it to show the poor people that if they take over this pub they could have all this? 6. Why did the Irish lad's Mum have subtitles when she was speaking English albeit with a bit of an accent? 7 Was it a coincidence that the name of pub was called The Cock? This had to be the most patronising piece of television I have ever seen, well since his last piece of pseudo altruistic nonsense....... Apologies one and all I felt I had to vent my spleen
  19. lovebenton0

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney i love chutneys with all kinds of meat, fish and even simple chutney sandwiches, as Monica Bhide suggests in Everything Indian. thanks, snowangel, for suggesting this one i concocted would be good with a sharp cheddar grilled cheese sandwich; it is. this is especially good also with pork, chicken and salmon. makes one pint chutney. 2-1/2 c rhubarb, diced 1/2 inch 1 c unsweetened pineapple, sliced and chopped 1/4 c golden raisins 1/4 c cider vinegar 3/4 c sugar 2 T ginger, minced 1/4 tsp ground cloves 1/4 tsp curry powder 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp hot thai chile flakes 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 T grapeseed oil 1/2 tsp kosher salt mix fruits with sugar and vinegar. allow to set for about an hour to extract juices and soften raisins. stir in spices, oil and salt. i wanted to try out the jam setting on my kneadful thing and did so. that was great, no muss, no stirring. otherwise i would have cooked this on medium low heat for about 30 to 45 minutes (depending on preference), stirring as needed to keep it from sticking. store in jar in fridge up to two months. Keywords: Condiment, Fruit, Easy, Hot and Spicy ( RG1975 )
  20. moosnsqrl

    James Beard Midwest

    Kudos to Chef Celina Tio, of The American Restaurant, for being named the James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Midwest.
  21. marie-louise

    Jamba Juice

    They are mostly in CA (no surprise, I guess) but many other states seem to have a few. http://www.jambajuice.com/what/index.html I'm curious what others think of them; I've never seen anyone mention them on eGullet. In my opinion, these are the perfect food for after a hike-fluid, carbs, and cold. My previous favorite post-hike snacks have been Scharffenberger bittersweet chocolate & ice water; a homemade chocolate chip-oatmeal cookie; an It's-It; or an In-n-Out chocolate milkshake. I actually like these better than any of my previous chocolate treats!!! I'm slowly but surely finding all of the nearest locations to each of our local parks. My favorite flavor is Orange-a-Peel,but I also like the cranberry one, Razzamataz, and the two w/ passion fruit in them. The mango one isn't too bad, either. I get the Femme boost.
  22. i was reading michael ruhlman's blog, and sometimes he has his friend, anthony bourdain, write some guest pieces. well, in one of those pieces, bourdain calls james beard a 'much disliked crank'. i understand why the beard awrds themselves might be viewed in a unfavorable light, but what did the man do to engender such feelings? this is the first time i've ever read or heard something so nasty about a man who did so much for the culinary arts in this country. http://blog.ruhlman.com/ruhlmancom/2007/03/index.html
  23. eatrustic

    James Barber

    As has been widely reported in the Vancouver media James Barber passed away at his home in Vancouver Island a few days ago. I wanted to pay tribute to the man as he is one of the giants on the food scene in Vancouver and as often happens to those who live a long life their accomplishments can tend to fade from memory. There is so much more to James then Money's Mushrooms or the Urban Peasant. I won't pretend to give a bio on his life as I have not been acquainted with his professional career for that long but I first became aware of his talent when I moved to Vancouver in the mid 80's. At the time he was writing the restaurant column for the Georgia Straight (for which he won national awards) and his weekly offerings were nothing short of brilliant as he combined a lovely turn of phrase with hands down the most informed food knowledge of the era. It was a pleasure to discover little out of the way ethnic restaurants that were described in loving detail and with obvious knowledge of the cuisines. This was in stark contrast to the pompous and mainstream food reporting of the time. What has struck me most about James as I've crossed his path over the years in some Asian market, charity auction or restaurant is his pure and unadulterated love of all things food and wine. He really was the foodie's foodie. He would talk to anyone who approached him with a question about food or restaurants with unbridled enthusiasm and an absolute lack of ego (so refreshing and rare). I ran into him one day on the street a few years back and he hauled me over to his car to show me this brand new gadget he had found at Lee Valley. It was one of the very first Micro Plane graters. He pulled out a lemon and started zesting away with real excitement at his find. His success in later years (at a time when most of us would have been in a rest home) with his Urban Peasant tv show, his columns in Van Mag, a new cookbook (along with his tireless support of many good causes) is a nice cap to a well lived life. My condolences to his wife (and fellow food and wine expert) Christina Burridge .
  24. SobaAddict70

    Ketchup

    I've never been able to figure out why foodies tend to despise ketchup. Like just about any condiment, it has its applications. If you don't like it, there are a million other condiments out there. The same goes for Worcestershire sauce and barbecue sauce, deli mustard and honey mustard, pickle relish and mango chutney, and jarred salsa. Why ask why? Just enjoy it for what it is. Maybe I'm weird for liking ketchup. I also will eat pickle relish straight out of a jar. Ditto for hoisin sauce. Soba PS. In the omuraisu thread in the Japan forum, Hiroyuki asks pretty much the same question, ao I thought I'd ask all y'all.
  25. Monica Bhide

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish This recipe is from The Beginner's Guide to Regional Indian Cooking in th eCGI ¼ cup black mustard seeds ¼ cup white mustard seeds A touch of garlic (Not traditional but the Chef loves it so we added it!) 4 fillets white fish (small Tilapia fillets) 1 tsp turmeric salt to taste Mustard oil to panfry the fish 2 Serrano green chilies, slit Soak mustard seeds (I use 50% black and 50% white) in water for 10-15 minutes. In a blender, grind mustard seeds and garlic with enough water. Start with a relatively less water and slowly keep adding water as needed. The final consistency will be a bit more liquid than Dijon mustard. Make sure that there are no whole seeds left over. In my blender, this process takes about 10 minutes. This will be your gravy. Don't forget to add a bit of salt and mix some more. Set aside. Marinate fish fillets with the turmeric and the salt. Heat a shallow pan with a little bit of mustard oil, over medium high heat. When oil starts to smoke, add in the fish pieces so they are in a single layer. After a minute or so, turn them over, and cook until brown. Remove from heat. In the same oil add the mustard paste. Add some slit green chilies for some heat. Cook the mustard paste until it starts boiling and then add the fish. Simmer for another 3 – 5 minutes. Serve hot. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish, Indian, eGCI ( RG884 )
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