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Found 568 results

  1. Just read that marco pierre white doesn't think that jaime oliver is a "real" chef because he hasn't earned any michelen stars. I think it's crap, but maybe I'm wrong. What does is it take to be a "chef"?
  2. i was reading michael ruhlman's blog, and sometimes he has his friend, anthony bourdain, write some guest pieces. well, in one of those pieces, bourdain calls james beard a 'much disliked crank'. i understand why the beard awrds themselves might be viewed in a unfavorable light, but what did the man do to engender such feelings? this is the first time i've ever read or heard something so nasty about a man who did so much for the culinary arts in this country. http://blog.ruhlman.com/ruhlmancom/2007/03/index.html
  3. teagal

    Tomato Jam/ Preserves/ Compote

    Okay, I've been seen a lot of tomato jam type recipes lately and have made a compote and bought a jam. They were both so sweet, but also a little savory and the tomato taste is still very much present. At a loss as to what to do with them. The only thing I can come up with is maybe as part of a cheese plate or as a cheaper version, served with some cream cheese and crackers. To me its too sweet to serve as a type of chutney with meat, but too tomatoey to put on toast. Hmmm... is it just me or is there something else to use it for?
  4. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  5. Stone

    Ketchup

    Oscar Madison called it "tomato wine." I love it. I love it on everything. I splosh it on my burgers. I plosh it on my vindaloo. I mosh it into my ice cream. I splorge it on my morning cereal. I squeeze it over corn, under towers of steak tartare, around store-bought pastry-puffs of mushroom and crab, and into doughnuts because what's jelly anyway but a misguided attempt at fruit-ketchup. I drench it on broccoli and quench my thirst with it. I've done away with Crest in favor of Heinzing my teeth every morning. 57 varieties for 30 teeth. I've filled my jacuzzi with a delightfully sweet tomotao froth. Some people think ketchup should be banned. That's crazy talk if you ask me. What say we petition the government to declare Ketchup the truly American food (hamburger and frankfurter sound too tuetonic for such an honor).
  6. I was in my local wine store today and decided to pick up some Scotch. I was in two or three minds about what to get until someone went in the back and pressed the above bottle into my hand. It appears to be a house blend from the well known London spirits merchants, though their Web site gives no hint this even exists. It tastes its age, costs all of $30 and it's bloody good. Has anyone else come across this before? Perhaps it's a U.S.-only bottling?
  7. jackal10

    Green Tomato Chutney

    Green Tomato Chutney Adapted from Bulletin 21 "Home Preservation of Fruit and Vegetables", Her Majesty's Stationary Office, first published 1929 You can adapt this for any garden surplus: apples, marrow, plums etc. Liquidised and sieved you can use it as the basis for a brown (steak) sauce. The long slow cooking and maturing gives a mellow dark brown chutney. The basic ingredients should be cut up and cooked so that the result is not completely smooth, but nothing is directly recognisable. Raisins, small cubes of crytallised ginger etc may be added to give character. 8 lb Green tomatoes 2 lb Apples 1 lb Raisins 2-1/2 lb Onions 2 chillis (more if you like it hotter) 1 oz Ginger 1 oz Salt 2 lb Brown sugar 2 pt Vinegar Cut up the tomatoes, peel and chop the onions and apples. Chop the raisins if they are large. Chop up the giner and the chillis, and tie them in a piece of muslin Place everything in a large pan, bring to the boil and simmer slowly until the desired consistency - about 8 hours. Remove the bag of spices and bottle in preserving jars (canning jars) while hot. Leave for a month or more in a dark cupboard. Keywords: Condiment ( RG1416 )
  8. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  9. Monica Bhide

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish This recipe is from The Beginner's Guide to Regional Indian Cooking in th eCGI ¼ cup black mustard seeds ¼ cup white mustard seeds A touch of garlic (Not traditional but the Chef loves it so we added it!) 4 fillets white fish (small Tilapia fillets) 1 tsp turmeric salt to taste Mustard oil to panfry the fish 2 Serrano green chilies, slit Soak mustard seeds (I use 50% black and 50% white) in water for 10-15 minutes. In a blender, grind mustard seeds and garlic with enough water. Start with a relatively less water and slowly keep adding water as needed. The final consistency will be a bit more liquid than Dijon mustard. Make sure that there are no whole seeds left over. In my blender, this process takes about 10 minutes. This will be your gravy. Don't forget to add a bit of salt and mix some more. Set aside. Marinate fish fillets with the turmeric and the salt. Heat a shallow pan with a little bit of mustard oil, over medium high heat. When oil starts to smoke, add in the fish pieces so they are in a single layer. After a minute or so, turn them over, and cook until brown. Remove from heat. In the same oil add the mustard paste. Add some slit green chilies for some heat. Cook the mustard paste until it starts boiling and then add the fish. Simmer for another 3 – 5 minutes. Serve hot. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish, Indian, eGCI ( RG884 )
  10. foodie52

    Homemade Chutney

    Made lamb curry the other night, using Jaz's recipe. After seeing the price of Major Grey's chutney, I decided to make my own : bought about $8 worth of mangos, some golden raisins and spices. I made over a quart for about $10. And it was really , really easy and tasted great! Anyone else make chutney regularly, and if so, what kinds?
  11. Abra

    Jamie's Velvet Thighs

    Jamie's Velvet Thighs Serves 4 as Main Dish. Dedicated to JamieMaw, to thank him for his gift of a jar of the delicious Mission Hill Plum and Pinot Sauce, and named for the velveting technique borrowed from Chinese cuisine. 6 large boneless skinless chicken thighs 4 egg whites 2 T cornstarch 3 T duck fat 1 c Mission Hill Plum and Pinot Sauce 1/2 c heavy cream salt and pepper Using a fork, beat the egg whites lightly with the cornstarch. Drop in chicken thighs and mix well with hands to coat chicken. Let rest for 30 minutes. Heat duck fat in a large skillet until very hot (don't use nonstick!). Drop in chicken pieces, season the side facing up, and let them cook over a medium-low heat. The chicken will stick to the pan, but cook until bottom side is golden brown. Turn chicken, scraping up the stuck golden bits. Cook like this, turning and scraping occasionally, for 15-20 minutes. Pour the plum sauce over the chicken, turning gently to coat chicken evenly. When the coating has absorbed the sauce, pour the cream evenly over all. Cook, turning, until chicken is done through and crispy golden. Adjust seasoning. Made like this, the chicken is just slightly spicy. Increase the amount of plum sauce for a spicier dish. NOTES : Use the very best chicken you can get. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Hot and Spicy ( RG1640 )
  12. Megan Blocker

    Curry Chutney Spread

    Curry Chutney Spread Serves 10 as Hors d'oeuvre. There are many variations on this, including ones that substitute smoked almonds for the bacon (a great tip for vegetarians), but this is my all-time favorite. I often forgo the processing of the chutney - as long as your chutney isn't super-chunky, you should be able to make this without dirtying your Cuisinart! 8 oz cream cheese (light or regular), at room temperature 1 T curry powder 8 oz mango chutney (one jar) 6 strips bacon, cooked until crisp, drained, and crumbled 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped In a small bowl, combine the cream cheese with the curry powder until mixture is well-blended and smooth. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the chutney a few times (until lumps are gone). Spread cream cheese mixture evenly over the bottom of an 8-inch quiche or pie dish. Spread the chutney on top, then top with crumbled bacon. Add the scallions evenly to the top. Serve with hearty crackers or small whole-grain toasts. Spread will keep, covered in plastic wrap and stored in the fridge, for up to two days. Bring to room temperature before serving. Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Dip ( RG1384 )
  13. joey madison

    Joe's Jambalaya

    Joe's Jambalaya Serves 4 as Main Dish. When most people think of Jambalaya, they generally think of a dish that includes rice, tomatoes, and various meats. This recipe is different -- a modern interpretation of an old favorite -- because it follows a more northern Louisiana tradition and omits the tomatoes. I think it makes the dish more elegant and subtle. It refridgerates reasonably well, and I like to serve it with a simple Italian country loaf of bread. It's a fairly flexible recipe, so feel free to experiment. 1 whole chicken breast 2 links of andouille sausage 1 c shrimp or other seafood (optional) 1 c long grain white rice 1 c water 1 c dry white wine 1 c chicken stock (preferably homemade) 1 large red bell pepper 2 ribs of celery 1 hot pepper of your choice (optional) 1 tsp Tabasco (or more) 2 T unsalted butter T fresh Italian parsley 1 tsp dried thyme salt and pepper to taste Dice the chicken breast into 1 inch cubes. Salt and pepper the chicken to taste. Heat a large dutch oven over a medium flame. Add the butter, and when it begins to foam, at the chicken to the pot. Brown slightly, but be sure not to over cook. Add the bell peppers and celery, coarsely diced, and stir for a minute. Then add the rice. While your performing the above tasks, bring the wine, water and stock to a bare boil in another pot. Add the liquid mixture to the dutch oven, along with the thyme, tabasco, and parsley. Add the sausage, cut into 1/4 inch slices to the same pot. If desired add a diced jalapeno, habanero, thai pepper, or whatever. Simmmer covered for 20-25 minutes or until the rice is softened but not pastey. If desired you can add shrimp or other seafood a few minutes before serving. Careful not to overcook the seafood. Taste and add additional salt if needed. Garnish with choped fresh parsley sprigs. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner, Hot and Spicy, American, Lunch, Pork, Fish, Rice ( RG1225 )
  14. Renee K

    Jelly Roll Sponge I

    Jelly Roll Sponge I 200 g eggs 120 g caster (superfine) sugar 125 g cake flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 40 g oil sift flour and baking powder together twice whisk egg whites till foamy, and gradually add the sugar. at soft peaks, add the yolks gradually and continue whisking to ribbon stage fold in the dry ingredients, followed by the oil pour into 28cm x 36cm (11 x 14 inch) or 25 x 36cm (10 x 14 inch) swiss roll pan bake at 200C (ummm... I think that's about 400F??) for about 8-10 minutes, depending on oven. Do not overbake. unmould immediately onto a wire rack once cool, spread with filling and roll up Keywords: Dessert, Cake ( RG1810 )
  15. I am looking for a recipe. I got from someone a jar of Jalepenos pickeled in a sweet soy sauce brine. It was amazing. Crunchy, sweet, salty and hot. I couldn't stop eating them. Now they are all gone and I don't have a recipe for it. I don't know the Korean name for it but the this soy sauce based sauce is also used to pickle other vegetables (e.g., garlic). I would really appreciate the recipe. Thanks in advance... Soup
  16. Last night's balmy skies graced our cocktail hour in the garden of the James Beard House. Apparently there are a lot of Bordeaux Wine Lovers a bout since this sold out event was subscribed by a diverse age group. The only 'difficult' part of the evening was making one's way past the swarm of staff from The Highlawn Pavilion & Manor who were hard at work in the petite kitchen to make each plate picture perfect. The appetizerrs [Frogs Legs w. black garlic, Spoons of Lobster w. mango, shots of spring pea soup w. jamon froth, wagu beef w. leeks and FG torchon] lept off the plates. Perhaps it was the Perrier-Jouet that helped them slide down? As Chef Mitchell Altholz slaved away in the kitchen ad the Knowles dynasty kept a laid back but watchful eye, the rest of us enjoyed this multi-course meal that began w. a plate of assorted crudo and ended with desserts typical of Bordeaux. An oil poached halibut, pheasant w foie gras & truffle & beef w. Bordeaux & blue cheese filled the gap between first and last courses. Michael Giulini of Deutsch & Sons supplied some excellent wines from Chateau Bonnet Rose to Ch Coucheroy Blanc to a Margaux, and a St Emilion. Surely the spirit of James Beard was hovering overhead on this wonderful evening...and me, I was the luckiest, as I got to enjoy all of it!
  17. I really miss Frank's Red Hot Sauce. I use it to make the hotwings I grew up with. Other hot sauces I can find easily in NY are not doing the job. Anyone know where I can buy it in Manhattan? Thanks folks, Grace
  18. I'm planning a bbq in a couple of weeks where I'll be serving homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream along with some sort of ginger cookies. I'm trying to think of a tasty and unique way to incorporate Sriracha in maybe a caramel sauce, or a candied nut...something of that nature that can go over the ice cream. Any ideas or experience with this?
  19. achevres

    Cinco de Mayo appetizer

    I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  20. savethedeli

    Guss's pickles

    Guss's pickles in the Lower East Side (the place with the barrels on the sidewalk) is fighting United Pickle for the rights to the Guss's name. New York Times
  21. When looking over some dried cherries and blueberries yesterday, I wondered if they could be reconstituted and made into preserves or jams. I've made a few things like this, and can't, off the top of my head, think of any reason it wouldn't work. But "few" is a key word. I'm interested in hearing the thoughts of more experienced preserve, jam, and jelly makers.
  22. Monica Bhide

    Eggless Mayonnaise

    My dad called and wants a recipe for eggless mayo -- I am not sure how to make it. I found some stuff on google with soy milk.. does not look appetizing at all. He can use regular milk if needed .. just does not want to use eggs.... any suggestions.. Also if this has already been covered here somewhere please just send me the link.. I tried a search but could not find anything thanks
  23. Quick question here - My potato salad recipe for this weekend begins with roasted new potatoes and a mayo/sriracha dressing. Trying to think of what to add from there without including the normal hard boiled egg, celery, etc..... Blanched/chopped fresh green beans...pickled asparagus....I know some obvious and delicious stuff is escaping me here..... IDEAS?
  24. Next week I will be volunteering at the James Beard house as a student chef. I figured that this will be a good opportunity to get in a little practice and learn some new techniques. I was told that the typical work will be prep and maybe some plating. My main concern is that I studied baking and pastry in culinary school. I was not taught knife skills, meat fab, etc... that I might have to do. The volunteer coordinator at the James Beard Foundation assured me that I will be able to be of use. Given that i am paying approx $35 round trip train ticket from New Haven, CT to volunteer, I want to make sure that i will be of service. What do you think? Thanks, Dan
  25. Lindacakes

    Gotta Find the Jam, Man!

    Somewhere I read about an expansive jam from Britian, can't remember where I read about it (Here? Gastronomica? The Saturday Evening Post?) but a woman described it as teeny tiny whole strawberries and oh-so-delicious. Cannot google myself into it . . . The preserving thread, which captivated me yesterday, made me remember it. Can you help me?
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