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  1. Past hour
  2. This. We've had triple digit weather for over a week now and I haven't turned the stove or oven on during that time. The microwave is a lifesaver when it comes to making meals when it's too hot to cook.
  3. Those are my favorites for eating. (Not so good for cooking, though.) Around here, they're selling for about $6 (US)/lb still. The ordinary red sweet cherries are about half that. I always have to debate whether the rainiers are twice as good as the reds. For me, the answer is often yes.
  4. Snack time! Rainier cherries also from Costco.
  5. Today
  6. MelissaH

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Isn't kaolin used as a medication for diarrhea? I'd be careful about eating too much of it, which might really, er, stop you up.
  7. liuzhou

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    Wow, you are too kind.
  8. ElsieD

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    @liuzhou You make the best looking chips!
  9. Because bending down is almost as challenging as reaching up.
  10. So I just pulled the second shank which had spent 72 hrs. in the sous vide. On the theory that any more cooking would dry it out even further, I opted not to do any searing. But by the same token I removed that outer layer of skin and gristle since it would not be spending any time with some beneficial heat. I do not believe the extra 24 hours made any noticeable difference to the tenderness or anything else. I stand by my opinion that this is not a cut of meat that benefits from being sous vided. But I saved the bone with its marrow, some of the flesh and even the bag liquid in case Kerry is in any kind of mood to play around with making gravy or whatever. It can certainly be binned if she opts not to do any of those things. And because I believe anything served on a skewer instantly becomes more attractive and tastier: With horseradish cream and a kumato. The latter was perfectly tasty.
  11. Tricky stuff because even though its cool and interesting, ultimately it still tastes like flavored dirt. Over the years I've used it to coat, paint or cake a number of items. As I matured as a chef I found that the novelty didn't hold up to reality - meaning, regardless of the technique it just wasn't that good (v. cool). Okay, but that said, the best use I found was making a kaolin batter that I mixed with local grasses to create my own version of adobe, which I then baked a fish that I had caught, caking the fish in the adobe and tossing it on the coals. That way you got an earthy essence infused into the meat without the grit and mouthful of dirt.
  12. Why don’t you put the induction hob on the floor?
  13. liuzhou

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    I don't know what I had for dinner. I mean, I know it is fish and chips, but not what kind of fish. I know the Chinese name, 白花鱼 (bái huā yú, literally 'white flower fish' ) but attempts to Google it just send me to other species and no English names. It is about the same size as a sea bass and with similar white flesh, but firmer in texture. Anyway they make for a fine F+C fish, after cleaning and filleting. I vaguely thought of doing some mushy peas to perfect the dish, but they don't have the requisite marrowfat peas here. Then I thought of using edamame, but sense prevailed and I ate the edamame as a starter.
  14. johnathanlee

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Recently I had the unforgettable experience of dining at Andoni Luis Adurizis’s restaurant, Mugaritz and had to buy one of his cookbooks, "Mugaritz". One of his many innovative recipes is “Edible Stones”. This makes use of kaolin, an edible clay sometimes sold as “Agalita”. A slurry is made using Agalita and Lactose to which is added food colouring. Boiled baby potatoes are skewered, dipped, and allowed to dry in the oven. They are served with real rocks to maximize what has been described as the culinary equivalent of trompe-l'œil. Guests of course are not to see the process or the skewered potatoes drying so as not to ruin the surprise. I have attached some pictures showing my results which, although visually not exactly like the real stones, were texturally and by weight, reasonably convincing. Now that I have served them at a dinner party, I am left with a large amount of Agalita! I am hoping there are some modernist chefs out there with more ideas for my remaining Kaolin.
  15. Parc is a French bistro on Rittenhouse Sq very popular and not bad Zinc is a great little French place near Jefferson hosp. about at 9th st or so.....Beware...there are two restaurants with this name in Phila. Osteria is up on Broad St and is a great contemp Italian. Pasta is great as is roasted meats. Get the roasted veg appetizer for the table Vernick is contemp fine dining. Very hard to get in, but you can eat at the bar Zahav is Israeli and great. If you need more, just ask. I'd choose Zinc and Osteria if it were me.
  16. Pastrypastmidnight

    Favorite white chocolate

    “Unfortunately”!!! Bwahahaha!! Exactly .
  17. Jim D.

    Favorite white chocolate

    Told you so. 😋
  18. weinoo

    Bloody chicken

    I'm pretty sure that brining, like kashering, was a technique used to draw the remaining blood out of a recently slaughtered animal. When people realized that perhaps it made stuff taste even better, that made it even better.
  19. Javlin Sale https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Javelin+PRO+Duo I have one of these as back up for my thermaPen 37 excellent price for a spare
  20. For my sister who's going soon. She likes French and contemporary Italian the most
  21. I've done the boiling water and the freezing. This is the first I've heard of microwaving, but I bet it works. Here's what I wonder: is it possible to wiggle off the leaves from the cored cabbage, one by one, and then give them a brief microwave steaming to soften them enough to roll? Then you'd have the rest of the head of cabbage raw and unadulterated, and therefore suitable to make into salads or slaw, or for shredding onto fish tacos, or other things that aren't as good with cooked cabbage.
  22. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    It took a few different twists and turns with the Nectarberries. I had found the Raspberry Jam with Bitters recipe at Bon Appetit, but my nectarberry jam project really turned into more of a nectarberry compote, which turned out to be a good thing. Then the idea morphed from serving it on an English muffin to a topping for a waffle. I use the old-fashioned Carbon Golden Malted Waffle Mix that they've been making for nearly 90 years. Then simply topped with some of the nectarberry compote. I thought it might need some whipped cream, but I didn't have any and the waffle didn't suffer because of it. Sure beats the gloppy strawberry out-of-a-can and whipped topping that chain restaurants serve.
  23. Christmas is usually too hot for cooking in Australia so most people forgo the turkey and eat cold food. Prawns are popular as is sliced ham. Here is my version from last year. Clockwise from top left: smoked salmon & capers, tomato & basil, ham, fresh snow peas, olives, nashi pear, bresaola.
  24. @weinoo Thank you I am going to add those instructions to @Okanagancook‘s very useful spreadsheet.
  25. weinoo

    Pizza Dough

    It's funny how you decide what's engineered and what isn't. A martini is a simple drink, just a few simple ingredients, same as your coveted Neapolitan pizza dough. And things with very few ingredients, as you well know, are the hardest to make properly, be it a classic cocktail or pizza. And an apple-tini might not ruin your martini, but's it's not a martini; it's just called one.
  26. liuzhou

    Bloody chicken

    My apologies. When you said "they knew" I missed that you were talking about a specific family. I thought you just meant people in general. Funnily enough, the first time I heard about the brining technique was back in the 1970s when I found a description in a Latin document from the late Roman Empire. I wish I could find it again, but any notes I made at the time are on the other side of the planet in my sister's attic. I'm told it was used in China even longer ago, but seems to have disappeared in modern cuisine. Some friends were horrified when they saw me throw what they thought of life-threatening salt into a brine one day. I've has similar reactions when just salting water for pasta. But then, I did have to wrestle three people to the ground to prevent them calling an emergency ambulance when they totally freaked because I ate a raw button mushroom. They were convinced I wouldn't last ten minutes. They love their food but, like people everywhere, know very little about it.
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