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  1. Past hour
  2. pastrygirl

    Donut from Waffle Mix?

    While I agree that simply having a hole doesn't make something a doughnut worth eating, I'm skeptical of Lisa's claims about glazing. Maybe the dough needs to be warm/hot from the fryer if you want a super thin glaze completely coating the pastry a la Krispy Kreme, but sometimes you want a thicker glaze piped on or dipped into. If you're going to dip a pastry in a chocolate glaze and add sprinkles, you'll want a cool pastry and warm but not hot glaze so you get good coverage without both the glaze and the sprinkles running off.
  3. If only you had a video or photo of his reaction! I’m sure his shop is going to have wonderful time experimenting with the EZtemper. Found a few of Paul Young’s brownie recipes online. Hope to try them out for the next party or office event.
  4. prashamk

    Donut from Waffle Mix?

    @Lisa Shock I thank you for spending your valuable time in writing two exhaustive posts for me. I've got your point... 1) Get Donut Premix & 2) Get a deep fryer. I wish to know that does one need to dip the hot donut straight out of the oil into the glaze? Also if the donuts are allowed to cool down before dipping into the glaze, will there be good adhesion between the two, as the temperature will be way lower than 375 Degrees in that case.
  5. Today
  6. Lisa Shock

    Donut from Waffle Mix?

    I just realized that there may be some misperceptions about your equipment. Are you using an oven and doughnut-shaped pans or one of those electric doughnut makers that are similar to a waffle iron? The pans were covered in another message thread here, where a woman was having trouble using them to make doughnuts for an office party. She was under the impression that they were the industry standard for making cake doughnuts. They're not, cake doughnuts are extruded/piped directly into hot oil. They never came out like doughnuts. I would also suspect they might not hold together as well as a real doughnut, as the fried exterior provides structural support. When you bake in a pan like those linked to above, the final product will have a soft bottom which is very much like the interior of a regular cake. However, the tops will always be a bit flat and will have a leathery top layer like the layer that bakers trim off cakes before frosting them. It will be ring-shaped cake, not a torus, and just as soft and crumbly as a slice of cake. Picking them up, either to decorate or eat, will be difficult. The electric machine, when loaded with waffle batter, will produce a hard, cracker-like crust. Because 'doughnuts' made with either system lack an outer layer of fat, which holds heat very well, they will cool rapidly as soon as they are removed from the oven/machine and you will have problems with glaze and/or topping adhesion. For the most part, you need the doughnuts to be screamingly hot, straight out of the oil to make the toppings and glazes work properly. I hope this helps! If you need clarification, just ask.
  7. Okay Okanagancook that is a level of organization I need to adopt!
  8. Hi kayb. I really haven't properly outfitted my IP yet. I definitely want that steamer basket, a tempered glass lid and a 7-inch spring form pan. The whole turkey wings I get are pretty huge--probably will only need two--and I am such a turkey wing lover so I think that I might experiment with cooking them along with the usual suspects (carrots, celery, onions, bay leaves, parsley, thyme) for maybe half or a third of the 90 minutes you do. Like I said above, any stock I get will be tastier than just plain water and flour and what I don't use for gravy can be used in my turkey vegetable soup along with any turkey scraps. Thanks for the great tip about running the pot through the saute cycle; hadn't thought of that. I think it's really dangerous hanging out with you 'cause those baby food thingies are just too damned cute! My MasterCard still has skid marks from all my recent shopping.☺ As a matter of fact this just arrived two days ago: It's the latest version of the Oster Countertop Convection Oven and, oh yes, it's red!
  9. I always was told they need to be cooked. They get that lovely peach/pink blush color. Honestly, I've never bothered. I'll pick one and just admire its odd shape.3
  10. Thanks Smithy. If you're a rank amateur then I guess I'm "ranker" tee hee since I've only used the IP twice! If I am using chicken scraps from a leftover roast chicken to make stock then I definitely toss any meat used. However, I think I need to experiment with cooking the wings for less time like you say. Frankly, growing up, we just used *gasp* water mixed with flour with the pan drippings and the gravy always turned out very tasty.
  11. Duvel

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    Dinner at a technical workshop in Nanjing ... I was allowed to select the dishes 😋 Some local veggie with sesame dressing Braised eggs and intestines (and ears) Century eggs in vinegar Shrimps with peas Shrimps with barley cooked in orange juice “Stinky” tofu Matsutake mushrooms Black pepper beef Pork in sweet bean sauce with steamed bread BBQ lamb ribs Spicy frog Pan-fried dumplings Fried mushrooms - their speciality Xiao Long Bao Crunchy potatoes Braised daikon Pork head terrine with aged vinegar
  12. Ditto for me on the IP for stock making in that fashion. My freezer has half full bags of veggie scraps and meat bites separated by type awaiting stock making. It is amazing how quickly it accumulates.
  13. captaincarl

    Chipotle's Mexican Grill

    OMG, I was there earlier this year, and ate there, and it was amazing! I was hoping that it was already a regional phenomenon that hadn't yet expanded into my home area. And I DO hope it expands!
  14. chromedome

    Foraging for favorites

    Most varieties are hard as a rock and inedibly tart, but there's a lot of variation. One of the universities in the PNW has been collecting cultivars from all over the continent for decades now, and apparently they have one or two that can be eaten out of hand like an apple. That'd be interesting to try. I collected about 15 pounds of quinces from one of my neighbours this year (a much better harvest than last year's).
  15. Really glad I found this thread. I've been using this thing pretty much since it came out, and I have always thought that I was the only one using it, since I could never found anyone talking about using it anywhere 😕 Not only that, to find someone else that actually has 2 units like myself is definitely mind blowing 😲 Thanks for the tip about getting the firmware. I've been looking for it forever. Didn't know I was supposed to contact Breville for it. I wonder why they don't just let you download it yourself...
  16. My experience is that they're very woody if eaten raw, but I'm not sure I've ever had a fresh (not store-bought) ripe quince. The ones I've tried from the grocery store haven't measured up to, say, membrillo - but neither do apricots.
  17. Like @Smithy, I've never found any meat left from making stock worth much other than pampering the dog. I use a carcass, however much meat is left clinging to it, skin and wings that didn't get eaten, a halved or quartered onion and four or five cloves of garlic. I don't salt it. I let it go 90 minutes and then however long on "keep warm" until I get around to doing something with it. I use the steamer basket to hold all my solids, so I just lift that out and chunk the contents. Then I run the pot through a couple of cycles of saute with the lid off, to reduce it by about half, and pour it into a baby food keeper thingy that lets me freeze about half-cup portions. When they're frozen, I pop them out and stash them in a zip-lock, label it as to what kind of stock, and back in the freezer they go. At present, I have bags of chicken, ham and beef stock in there. It's simple enough to add the water back in when you're using it. I've been told it works well to keep all sorts of veggie scraps frozen and when you have enough, make vegetable stock. Onion trimmings, carrot peels, broccoli stems, and so on. Have never tried that.
  18. scubadoo97

    Rum Drinks

    Been make a corn ‘n’ oil recently. Rum and falernum with a dash of bitters
  19. It is your mission in life to cost me money. And you do it well.
  20. Two that I found this evening: Lucinda Scala Quinn's "Lucinda's Rustic Italian Kitchen" Kindle Edition $1.99US You may recognize her from her "Mad Hungry" series or as a co-host of "Everyday Food". Use the "Look Inside" feature to see the list of recipes. "The Farmer's Cookbook: A Back to Basics Guide to: Making Cheese, Soups and Stews, Curing Meat, Preserving, Baking Bread, Fermenting, Pies and Cookies, and More (The Handbook Series)" Kindle Edition $2.99US Organized by months of the year, each month has it's own list of recipes. Use the "Look Inside" feature to see a sample of this. I am a US Prime member and the price you see may vary.
  21. scamhi

    Dinner 2018 (Part 1)

    white truffle, parmesan, tagliatelle and sous vide egg
  22. I haven't tried broth with turkey at all, and I've never purchased spare parts for the broth-making, but here's what I have experienced with chicken: by the time the broth is done - whether in a standard stock pot or the instant pot - the broth has pretty much all the flavor and the meat has very little. My dog appreciates the remainders, mind you, but those bits of meat that I tried didn't merit inclusion in any dish I could think of. I suppose if the meat were cooked for less time it would retain flavor, but then the stock would have less. Furthermore, I think the thickness of the "jelly" relies on melting the collagen from within the meat. This has also been my experience with beef. Caveat: I am a rank amateur at this. Let's hope the pros can tell us how to get good broth without destroying the meat!
  23. Is the red potato what we here in the US know as a sweet potato? Looks like it...
  24. A couple of related strays 红薯 (Mand hóng shǔ; Cant: hung4 syu4). Red potato. These are very popular, especially at this time of year and through the winter. They are often steamed with other root vegetables. Alternatively, there are dozens of guys like this, selling them roasted in the streets. Then we have these. Known as 黑薯 (Mand hēi shǔ; Cant: hak1 syu4), meaning 'blsck potatoes' or, perhaps more accurately, 紫薯 (Mand zǐ shǔ; Cant: zi2 syu4). The skin can be purplish black, but the flesh is this bright purple, which fades when they are cooked. They are used in the same manner as the red potatoes.
  25. Lisa Shock

    Donut from Waffle Mix?

    Doughnuts in general fall into two categories: fried lean bread dough and fried rich cake batter. Note that many traditional toppings for doughnuts rely on the doughnuts being 375°F hot (hotter than a toaster) as they come out of the fryer. They won't spread well or adhere at lower temperatures. Flavor-wise, well, how would you react if you asked me to make a delicious birthday cake for you and instead of a rich, moist cake batter, I baked waffle batter in a cake tin and frosted it and served it to you? You should check out where the world of doughnuts is at right now. A good example of what you should be doing if you want to make good doughnuts, not some pale imitation of a doughnut, can be found on the Ideas In Food blog. Alex and Aki have a business called Curiosity Doughnuts and their blog chronicles their work on various formulas. Waffle batter is too dry, has too much chewy gluten texture and too little flavor to make a decent doughnut. Your toasting machine along with waffle batter will create a crunchy exterior crust, essentially be making very, very thick waffles. The whole joy of waffles is the outer crust. Adding 3cm+ of depth will not improve them. Nor, will making a waffle thicker turn it into a doughnut. In my fairly-well trained opinion, changing the ingredients and the method of cooking means that you will simply not be making doughnuts. Your end product will be bland, dry and crunchy. -And icings, toppings, glazes, etc. either won't stay on the finished product or will soak into it making them have an undesirable texture. (the deep-frying gives doughnuts a fat shell which protects them from sogginess which would otherwise result from the water in glazes) Generally, baking is more of a precise science and there are reasons why various batters are formulated differently from each other. The one exception is crepe batter which does triple duty as popover batter and Yorkshire pudding batter. If you aren't willing or able to get a small deep fryer and make either cake batter or lean bread dough as a doughnut base, then IMO, doughnuts shouldn't be on your menu.
  26. kayb

    Food Waste @ Home

    Damndog has had pancreatitis. Can't feed her people food.
  27. gfweb

    Food Waste @ Home

    you need a dog guilt-free old food disposal Hey, Henry...look what I have for you!
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