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AndrewM

Vegetables & Produce Books

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All this talk of farmer's markets and seasonal favorites has me looking to plug a gaping hole in my cookbook shelves. What are your favorite vegetable cookbooks? I'd like to get something relatively comprehensive that deals with seasonal, selection and storage info in addition to recipes.

For instance, anyone have any opinions on "Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini: The Essential Reference" by Elizabeth Ann Schneider or James Peterson's "Vegetables"? Farmer's market-type cookbooks? Specialized vegetable cookbooks, e.g., Greens, Salads etc.? (I'm not looking for vegetarian cookbooks. :wacko: ) Thanks!

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All this talk of farmer's markets and seasonal favorites has me looking to plug a gaping hole in my cookbook shelves. What are your favorite vegetable cookbooks? I'd like to get something relatively comprehensive that deals with seasonal, selection and storage info in addition to recipes.

Andrew, I like "Chez Panisse Vegetables" by Alice Waters. Also "Greene on Greens" is a helpful resource. Neither are specifically vegetarian cookbooks.

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The Victory Garden Fish & Vegetable Cookbook has a loyal following. It's out of print and used copies go for about $80. That's a full title, separate from the general Victory Garden Cookbook that is more widely available. I have a copy but haven't actually used it yet. Tempted to sell it instead.

It's vegetarian, but I do like my Moosewood Kitchen Garden cookbook because it does have quite a bit on storing etc. And most of the recipes are sides so there's no reason not to have them with meat. I do.

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I second Chez Panisse Vegetables, which, besides being full of information on varieties and cultivation and having many good recipes, is beautifully typeset, bound and illustrated. (The other night, however, I was surprised to find narry a word on jerusalem artichokes in it.)

Collectively, Marcella Hazan's various books are a veritable cornucopia of interesting vegetable recipes.


Edited by carswell (log)

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I have Peterson's book. I find that it treats a fairly wide range of vegetables, with some solid (though not outstandingly creative) recipes and approaches for dealing with them. The illustrations are quite good, especially those illustrating techniques (e.g. turning carrots and artichokes.) I like the book, though I'd want to compare it to similar veggie cookbooks before recommending it as The One To Buy.

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Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything has a nice veggie section.


I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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My current two favorite books for vegetables are:

Vegetables Every Day by Jack Bishop

and

The Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson

Actually, all of the Jack Bishop books are good references.

Verdura by Vianna LaPlace isn't bad either.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Vegetables A to Z is a great book, but wouldn't really recommend as a vegetable cookbook, it doesn't cover the "common" vegetables and it is more heavy on information then recipes.

I do have to admit it is one of my favorite books, but I have yet to make a recipe from it.

I know you said not vegetarian but Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is really wonderful, it is usually the first book I go to when I can't decide what to do with a certain vegetable.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

Word.


Noise is music. All else is food.

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I know you said not vegetarian but Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is really wonderful, it is usually the first book I go to when I can't decide what to do with a certain vegetable.

Yes, what I meant when I said not vegetarian was that I didn't want to make broccoli forests and the like, or require ways to get protein on the plate other than meat. :smile: Deborah Madison's books look excellent.

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Schneider.  Schneider.  Schneider.  Schneider.

Oh, yes.

Vegetables A-Z is the best. Despite no sections on tomatoes or bell peppers, it's still the best.

Although, I've just bought Anatomy of a Dish (Diane Forley), which is a beautiful book with a very different approach -- cooking by plant family. Lots of information in this book, and heart-wrenchingly gorgeous photos.

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Forley. Forley. Forley. Forley.

Yup, her, too. Wonderful, wonderful book.

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Another book came to mind. John Ash's From the Earth to the Table. Although this isn't purely vegetable book, he celebrates the use of seasonal ingredients.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Well, Charlie Trotter's Vegetables perhaps.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Marcella Hazan can be a little didactic for some tastes, but she does know and love her vegetables--pretty well any of her books, but especially Classic Italian Cooking, treat vegetables reverently and imaginatively.


Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

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Yoneda "The heart of Zen Cuisine"

Yes, this is a charming book by the abbess of a Rinzai Zen nunnery that serves shojin ryori kaiseki. Very simple and approachable seasonal menus and recipes with great and useful photographs.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I've been looking for lists/charts of produce that's in season by month or season. Online links or books will work. Any help would be great.

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There's a wonderful book called "Produce - a Fruit and Vegetable Lover's Guide"

by Bruce Beck with fantastic color photos (one page per fruit or vegetable), and a chart of each item's seasonal availability - and I know you can pick up a copy used on half.com for around five or 6 bucks.


Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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It all depends on where you live.

Most states' Dept. of Ag. have some sort of guide, as do large local farmer's markets.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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