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Jim D.

Protective Gloves

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I am seeking gloves that are good as protection in working with sugar and, more precisely, caramel. In doing a search, I assumed there would be something called "sugar gloves" or some such name, but the only specific ones I located appear to be discontinued. I am preparing once again to make Wybauw's banana and passion fruit caramel, and I am tired of getting burned when the liquid in the fruits starts spattering. It also happens when I am reducing raspberry purée. I have heavy, thick BBQ mitts, but they make it quite difficult to work for very long. Any ideas would be much appreciated.

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I have a pair of oven type gloves called the Ove Glove...as I remember.  Bought them a long time ago.  I am a woman and don't have large hands.  I imagine they would fit my husband's fingers much better and so they might fit you JimD...assuming they are still for sale somewhere. 

 

OK.  Yes they are still for sale in Canada, at least, at Walmart and Canadian Tire....


Edited by Darienne (log)
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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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6 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I have heavy, thick BBQ mitts, but they make it quite difficult to work for very long.

 

Is it lack of dexterity, how hot and sweaty they get, something else?  An you're not pulling sugar, just not a fan of the 'free tattoos' from hot splatters?  Sometimes long sleeved chef coats actually do come in handy to protect the forearms ... (the rest of the time, they're like straightjackets) 🙃


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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I think you have alot of affordable and practical options when it comes to gloves. Just my personal opinion, I wouldnt get anything that is labeled 'sugar gloves,' its just a way to mark up the price on regular gloves. When I pull sugar, I my first layer is a nitrile coated glove, like these:

Ironton Nitrile-coated Gloves, 12 pr

And second layer is a pair of 6 mil venom steel, like these:

https://www.amazon.com/Venom-Nitrile-Gloves-Resistant-Disposable/dp/B01CO9RKGQ/ref=asc_df_B01CO9RKGQ/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167121456202&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12591415589683233649&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9061195&hvtargid=aud-801381245258:pla-338155820524&psc=1

The first really takes the brunt of the heat, then the second just make handling the sugar easier. I used to use vinyl gloves, but they would tear so often with the heat of the sugar, and I would never want to take chances of a small piece of glove being pulled into a batch of sugar or taffy, thus the 6 mil thick gloves, I've never had those tear on me. 

 

Since your not really handling the caramel, I'd recommend the gloves from the first amazon link, after use they wash up real easy, and just hang to dry. Otherwise I dont think theres any reason you couldnt use a pair of those ordinary yellow dish gloves. I used to use those when I first started pulling sugar, they worked well for handling the heat, but they seemed to impart a flavor to the sugar, so I stopped and searched out another solution. Hopefully that helps, I've used many types and combos through the years, the two linked above are what I consider both ideal and affordable.

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8 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Is it lack of dexterity, how hot and sweaty they get, something else?  An you're not pulling sugar, just not a fan of the 'free tattoos' from hot splatters?  Sometimes long sleeved chef coats actually do come in handy to protect the forearms ... (the rest of the time, they're like straightjackets) 🙃

 

 

The BBQ mitts are just too thick to have any dexterity at all. I know I don't need much since I am just stirring, but the hand gets very tired from the effort of holding the spoon and stirring, esp. since the gloves make it difficult to grasp the spoon. I have others intended for BBQ called Pit Mitts, and they are thinner, thus allowing for more dexterity, but they have some sort of fiber on the outside that I feared might come off and drop in the caramel/raspberry purée. I need to check on the gloves Chocolot mentioned previously and make sure they don't have such fibers. I'll also look into what minas6907 described--perhaps using the gloves he recommends will also confer his confectionery skill and artistry on me?

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Then I'd say go to the hardware store and get whatever canvas or leather gloves still allow good dexterity and wear long sleeves. 

 

I have quilted oven mitts but dexterity is poor.  I was happy to get through several big batches of caramel with only a few small splatters but then lost a new thermometer to the cauldron while wearing mitts.  Win some, lose some.

 

I think MInas' top link looks better for splatter protection because they're looser.  Anything skin tight will still transfer heat immediately.


Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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On the subject of food handling gloves ...  Over the years I've found that latex gives me a rash so I use the white-ish nitrile gloves.  Recently gloves have been out of stock everywhere so when my kitchen tenant found some and brought me 4 boxes I was excited.  However after a few days of the new black nitrile gloves the backs of my hands are itching like crazy with tiny bumps.  Coincidence?  Different formula for the black ones?  Any suggestions for a snug, flexible, hypo-allergenic disposable glove?  My hands have enough to deal with 😟

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28 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

On the subject of food handling gloves ...  Over the years I've found that latex gives me a rash so I use the white-ish nitrile gloves.  Recently gloves have been out of stock everywhere so when my kitchen tenant found some and brought me 4 boxes I was excited.  However after a few days of the new black nitrile gloves the backs of my hands are itching like crazy with tiny bumps.  Coincidence?  Different formula for the black ones?  Any suggestions for a snug, flexible, hypo-allergenic disposable glove?  My hands have enough to deal with 😟

 

Are the new ones powdered or similar? sometimes one can have issues with that stuff. 

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, weinoo said:

I'm wondering if there's any way you can wear a first layer of cotton glove and then top that with the food handling glove?

 

 

 

Yes.  The scientific supply houses (and I'm sure Amazon) sell lightweight cotton glove liners.  It can take some looking to find the best fit, especially for smaller hands but they're out there.  The nicest ones fit well and can be laundered and re-used.  Others stretch out and don't last very well. 

Edited to add that sturdier ones are also sold in art supply stores for handling archival materials but they can also be used as glove liners. 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)

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1 hour ago, jimb0 said:

 

Are the new ones powdered or similar? sometimes one can have issues with that stuff. 

 Powder free but black and a different brand.  All the bleach probably isn't helping either 😜

 

1 hour ago, weinoo said:

I'm wondering if there's any way you can wear a first layer of cotton glove and then top that with the food handling glove?

 

 

 

43 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Yes.  The scientific supply houses (and I'm sure Amazon) sell lightweight cotton glove liners.  It can take some looking to find the best fit, especially for smaller hands but they're out there.  The nicest ones fit well and can be laundered and re-used.  Others stretch out and don't last very well. 

Edited to add that sturdier ones are also sold in art supply stores for handling archival materials but they can also be used as glove liners. 

 

Hmm, good idea, I did get a bunch of cheap cotton gloves once for handling chocolate.  Though if the cotton ones end up sweaty and gross inside the other glove, I might stick with the suffering I know.

 

thanks!

 

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