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boilsover

I Bought a Tutove – Now What?

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Then there's this:  https://vermontrollingpins.com/shop/tutove_rolling_pin.shtml

And this, from  https://www.cookstr.com/recipes/wheaten-croissants

"A tutove (ridged) rolling pin can be used, for added ease in rolling, for the first four turns, after which the dough layer becomes too thin, and the butter could break through."


Edited by boilsover (log)

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If anyone has a copy of Bernard Clayton's The Complete Book of Pastry - perhaps they could look it up. I'm away from home and don't have access and can't find it on Google books.

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Your wish...

 

Clayton.JPG.17f3592831bcb856b1e0e151d39a67f4.JPG

 

"Puff pastry and other layered doughs have their own imported rolling pin that does a masterful job of spreading the chilled butter beneath the dough.  It has 3/16-inch grooves running lengthwise on the 4-pound plastic roller and is made by a French firm, Tutove.  It is very expensive, but worth it if you are deep into puff pastry. The twenty two rounded ribs separating the grooves push the butter ahead as the pin is rolled. With it there is less wear and tear on both the dough and the butter. The butter always seems to be better behaved under its influence."  (weinoo - and who doesn't want to see butter better behaved!)


Edited by weinoo (log)
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3 hours ago, weinoo said:

Your wish...

 

Clayton.JPG.17f3592831bcb856b1e0e151d39a67f4.JPG

 

"Puff pastry and other layered doughs have their own imported rolling pin that does a masterful job of spreading the chilled butter beneath the dough.  It has 3/16-inch grooves running lengthwise on the 4-pound plastic roller and is made by a French firm, Tutove.  It is very expensive, but worth it if you are deep into puff pastry. The twenty two rounded ribs separating the grooves push the butter ahead as the pin is rolled. With it there is less wear and tear on both the dough and the butter. The butter always seems to be better behaved under its influence."  (weinoo - and who doesn't want to see butter better behaved!)

 

 

Thank you.  I feel better about my $69 investment now.

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13 hours ago, weinoo said:

  (weinoo - and who doesn't want to see butter better behaved!)

 

 

Say that five times, fast....

 

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Empirical comparison would seem to be called for - multiple batches made with conventional pin vs tutove, comparative "puff" shots, etc - but that's probably more effort than it's worth for what amounts to idle curiosity for the rest of us. 

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Love the LeGuin quote. What a loss.

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6 hours ago, chromedome said:

Empirical comparison would seem to be called for - multiple batches made with conventional pin vs tutove, comparative "puff" shots, etc - but that's probably more effort than it's worth for what amounts to idle curiosity for the rest of us. 

 

I'll play with it awhile, but a systematic trials-type comparison would probably be best left to our chef friend.

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On 1/24/2018 at 2:51 PM, boilsover said:

 

I'll play with it awhile, but a systematic trials-type comparison would probably be best left to our chef friend.

Our 'chef friend'? Who would that be?

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As somoeone who will never make puff pastry although I do use the store-bought stuff, I would love to see the results.

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10 hours ago, Kerala said:

As somoeone who will never make puff pastry although I do use the store-bought stuff, I would love to see the results.

 

Happy to share what I learn.

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Posted (edited)
On 1/24/2018 at 5:15 AM, chromedome said:

Empirical comparison would seem to be called for - multiple batches made with conventional pin vs tutove, comparative "puff" shots, etc - but that's probably more effort than it's worth for what amounts to idle curiosity for the rest of us. 

 

Well, my friend and I ran an A-B comparison last Wednesday with 4-turn kouign aman.  Eveything but the pin was the same.

 

The spring was uniformly greater in the tutove-rolled batch (12 pastries each) than the one rolled under a smooth tapered French pin, resulting in a lighter center, and the layers inside were more distinct.  The same result obtained in both pastry rings and muffin tins.  I will post photos later.


Edited by boilsover (log)

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OK, so here are two photos which show the difference.  The Tutove-rolled pastries are on the rack in the foreground, and the ones rolled with a plain pin sit behind.

 

I also include a photo where the Tutove can be seen.

 

 

kouign 2.jpg

kouign 3.jpg

Tutove.jpg

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Are they baked in the same size pan?

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It's hard to really tell the difference when one batch is in the front and the other is bringing up the rear, so to speak.  Can you post a picture of them side by side?

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10 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Are they baked in the same size pan?

 

Yes.  The rings were all the same model.  And the tins all took the same-diameter parchment rounds in their bottoms.

In the second photo, the smooth-pin pastries from the tins are inverted to show how they did not caramelize very well.

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9 hours ago, ElsieD said:

It's hard to really tell the difference when one batch is in the front and the other is bringing up the rear, so to speak.  Can you post a picture of them side by side?

 

Sorry, these are all the photos of the finished pastries.  All were eaten and/or given away.

The difference was obvious in person.  I think it's pretty easy to see in the photos, too.

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Generally, when testing, one cuts the pastry so that the internal layers can be evaluated. It would have been interesting to see two cut halves, one from each batch, next to each other.

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11 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

Generally, when testing, one cuts the pastry so that the internal layers can be evaluated. It would have been interesting to see two cut halves, one from each batch, next to each other.

 

I bit a couple (dozen) in two.  Does that count?

 

I didn't realize I had to convince a jury beyond a reasonable doubt.  I'll bring the Tenderometer next time.

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Boilsover,  thanks for your posts.  I find I can learn a lot just by watching this board , and I have never heard of the tutove before, and now that I see it, it seems that  instead of forming a solid layer of butter in each layer, it is being segmented into pockets in each layer, though that is just speculation.   Did you use it differently than you would use a regular rolling pin?  I wondered whether you would run it over the dough just once, or if you went back and forth and tried to keep the grooves in the same place or not?    Not to diminish the demand for the true tutove, it doesn't seem that hard to replicate something similar out of a wooden dowel.  

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1 hour ago, Barrytm said:
1 hour ago, Barrytm said:

Did you use it differently than you would use a regular rolling pin?  I wondered whether you would run it over the dough just once, or if you went back and forth and tried to keep the grooves in the same place or not? 

No, I used it the same way I would have used a smooth pin--if only because that's all I knew to do.  The recipe called for several repetitions of rolling out the dough into a rectangle of specific dimensions, so the rolling was 98% in the direction of the 2 axes.  No, keeping the grooves in the same place isn't humanly possible--the impressions quickly disappear.  I'm speculating, but perhaps the Tutove imparts wavy (i.e., longer) layers than a flat pin does?

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No, keeping the grooves in the same place isn't humanly possible--the impressions quickly disappear.  I'm speculating, but perhaps the Tutove imparts wavy (i.e., longer) layers than a flat pin does?

 
 
Thanks for the quick reply. Wavy is a better way of describing it than I did, though since you went back and forth, my guess is that the waves are very tiny.  

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Barrytm said:

Wavy is a better way of describing it than I did, though since you went back and forth, my guess is that the waves are very tiny.

 

Yes.  The beads on the pin are 3/32" tall.  In a 4-turn pastry, there are 81 layers (an 8-turn is something like 6500!) so even a little extra length should count up.


Edited by boilsover (log)

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Posted (edited)

I don't know anything about tutoves, I just want to say those kouign amans look delicious!

 

Just a thought, if there's ever a next time, I'd love to see what the pastries look like, side by side, before going into the oven. I wonder if the tutove makes a difference in how the butter smears into the dough.

 

And honestly, no discernable difference in the two batches, but I'm looking at it from a computer screen at 9am in the morning. Dough A looks just as flaky and puffy as Dough B. Dough A (regular pin) maybe moreso.


Edited by Smokeydoke (log)

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