Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Raamo

Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

My thought was similar - the picture didn't have that shine of the boiled version and all they talked about was baking - it's almost like the whole thing was an afterthought in the book but I recall Nathan saying how impressed he was by the gluten free bagel when he talked at George Brown. 

 You’ll have to scroll a long way down here  but it does seem that gluten-free bagels were an afterthought. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 You’ll have to scroll a long way down here  but it does seem that gluten-free bagels were an afterthought. 

Guess the 'patent pending' was serious!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten free bagels

 

 

IMG_4380.thumb.jpg.e737e66738735c1ca01b2ae8b6bc05f4.jpg

 

The dough is solid! 

 

 

IMG_4382.thumb.jpg.7e0ccf8ecd764a77c475e5d22bd91d8b.jpg

 

But wonderfully easy to shape because it's solid!

 

 

IMG_4384.thumb.jpg.f4e5a03c62644a5542a66ee55c2f3ed1.jpg

 

Not very brown - but to be fair I forgot the sugar so that's probably why. 

 

 

 

IMG_4383.thumb.jpg.a5909fc2a6efe8e2e028a096a835dfd7.jpg

 

Didn't think they'd have a crumb because they seemed like solid little blocks - but they did and were described as having potential by the hubby for whom they were made. 

 

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2019 at 1:01 AM, Kmanim said:

When Myhrvold was talking about taking pictures of the cut-in-half wok for Modernist Cuisine and how it kept lighting on fire, he said "it only has to look good for 1/1000th of a second!"

 

The problem I had with my crumb was that it seemed tougher than the crumbs I got on other sourdoughs prior to working with Modernist Bread.

 

Your crumbs honestly look very good though, and I'm sure they taste excellent! I think Instagram has spoiled our appetite for open crumbs...

 

What size loaf are you working with? I generally bake 700-800g loaves for batards. I started to move towards it because that seems to be the right size for my banneton, but I have also found that if I go for 1kg, I tend to lose a bit of volume. 

 

 

I've been using 850 g. How do you manage to get your loaves to have that tight volume after baking? Mine tends to spread and become flat. I'd love them to look a bit taller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2019 at 1:27 AM, Kmanim said:

I just managed to get Vol. 2 & 3 from my public library (thank you!). Very helpful for informing some assumptions I had made from just Vol. 4. But it has also raised some questions I was hoping someone could help me with. 

 

I capriciously bought some (expensive) calcium ascorbate thinking it would work the same as ascorbic acid as it had vitamin C labelled all over it. Does anyone here know if it should work more-or-less as well as ascorbic acid? I'm not good enough at chemistry and I'm not sure how to conduct an experiment to check that it is doing it's job. I have made their ancient grain bread and daily bread which use it but I had no control, and I'm not sure how pronounced its effect is supposed to be on the dough either. 

 

Does anyone else find the batard preshaping and shaping instructions confusing? I can't even understand their preshaping instructions on 3.154, and the shaping instructions that follow on both pages are also relatively complicated to understand. I seem to end up with a much longer batard than in their pictures.

 

Has anyone managed to make a food processor work for the lean doughs from vol. 4 that are higher than the hydration from the Van Over formula? Every time I've tried mixing another dough formula (including ones that they have food processor instructions for), I've ended up with a batter that stops mixing properly and overheats my Magimix (and rides up the inside of the blade and makes it really annoying to clean). Does anyone have any experience with higher (than Van Over) hydration doughs in the fp?

 

 

 

I did find them confusing at first. But then I watched a few different shaping videos that correspond to the MB descriptions pretty well. For step 2, "Roll the dough away from you, and continue to gently roll it back and forth until it just comes together", I found confusing. But I *think* it's the same technique as seen in this video below, where the instructor tells you to "roll and push."

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made another attempt at the MB sourdough and I made some progress. It was obvious from previous attempts that it was underproofed. I realized that I'd been bulk fermenting the dough at far too low of a temp (70 F). I use that temp for bulking baguettes, so I thought I was supposed to use the same temp for levain dough. But I re-read the bulk fermentation section, and saw that it recommends a bulk fermenting temp of 80 F. Doh! Would it be too much to ask the authors of MB to have listed the recommended bulk fermentation temperatures on the master recipe page? I bulk fermented the dough at 80 F for 3 hr 30 m with a total of 4 folds. The dough was quite elastic after that. I'm still hesitant with scoring and my shapes are still not symmetrical but i'm happy. I'm not going to try and make sourdough and baguettes again until I become a lot more organized. I was all over the place. My baguettes really suffered from it although I'm happy with the crumb.

 

2vCfs9t.jpg

 

sg09wRM.jpg

 

frpj2Jw.jpg


Edited by underproofed (log)
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Gluten free bagels

 

 

IMG_4380.thumb.jpg.e737e66738735c1ca01b2ae8b6bc05f4.jpg

 

The dough is solid! 

 

 

IMG_4382.thumb.jpg.7e0ccf8ecd764a77c475e5d22bd91d8b.jpg

 

But wonderfully easy to shape because it's solid!

 

 

IMG_4384.thumb.jpg.f4e5a03c62644a5542a66ee55c2f3ed1.jpg

 

Not very brown - but to be fair I forgot the sugar so that's probably why. 

 

 

 

IMG_4383.thumb.jpg.a5909fc2a6efe8e2e028a096a835dfd7.jpg

 

Didn't think they'd have a crumb because they seemed like solid little blocks - but they did and were described as having potential by the hubby for whom they were made. 

 

 

 

How'd they taste??? Was it reminiscent of regular bagels despite being gluten free?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ancient Grain Bread (KM p. 102)

 

The "ancient grain" section of the book contains, as usual, a "Master Recipe", a "Modernist Variation," and a dozen or so specific ingredient combination suggestions. It also contains a basic formula for developing your own. So for my first attempt I made the Master Recipe exactly as written. The basic idea is to blend 60% high-gluten wheat bread flour and add 40% of the "ancient grain" flour(s), plus standard wheat-based liquid levain. Their recipes mostly use blends of three different alternate grains: in this case, Kamut, Emmer and Spelt. As an inclusion the Master recipe has you add sprouted sorghum, and it uses pearl millet as a topping.

 

First things first: it's fantastic. Definitely one of the best breads I've ever had. I found the millet topping a bit too crunchy, and I added too much of it, I think (it goes everywhere when you slice!). But the basic flavor of the bread is superb. I have not been on the ancient grain bandwagon up to this point (I guess the marketing rubs me the wrong way), but at least this particular combination is absolutely worth making. Using high gluten flour I had no trouble getting to a windowpane stage, and the crumb of the bread is every bit as good as my standard sourdough. I'm definitely looking forward to the next few months of baking... I have a lot of different grains to experiment with, and I know I've got at least one winner on my hands.

 

DSC_8219.jpgDSC_8220.jpg

  • Like 14
  • Delicious 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2019 at 9:17 PM, underproofed said:

 

 

I've been using 850 g. How do you manage to get your loaves to have that tight volume after baking? Mine tends to spread and become flat. I'd love them to look a bit taller.

Well the weight definitely isn't it. I've actually been having a spreading issue since I've started trying out their shaping methods last week... If I were smart, I'd go back to the way I was doing it before but I'm trying to give their instructions a chance.

 

@Chris Hennes how do you shape your batards? You always seem to have nice tall loaves (like that amazing-looking ancient grain loaf!). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2019 at 9:30 PM, underproofed said:

Made another attempt at the MB sourdough and I made some progress.

Wow both those loaves look amazing - better-looking baguettes than most of the ones I had in Paris over New Year!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kmanim said:

@Chris Hennes how do you shape your batards? You always seem to have nice tall loaves (like that amazing-looking ancient grain loaf!). 

Depends on how sticky the dough is. The ancient grain bread is quite sticky so I just sort of pull the outside around with my thumbs to pull it taught, rolling it a bit to get the shape right. I am proofing in bannetons, which also helps.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ancient Grain Bread: Buckwheat, Corn and Sorghum (KM p. 105)

 

This follows the same basic recipe as the Master Ancient Grain bread. The grains are swapped out, vital wheat gluten is added, and the hydration is tweaked. The inclusions this time around are sprouted buckwheat and freeze-dried corn. Overall I'd say the bread is good but not great, and I don't care for the freeze-dried corn inclusion (it gets gummy). Their photo appears to show a much darker crumb than I ended up with, which is interesting.

 

DSC_8226.jpg

 

DSC_8228.jpg


Edited by Chris Hennes Grammar. (log)
  • Like 7
  • Delicious 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the right the gluten free brioche.  On the left Shokupan made with modernists gluten free flour mix with added vital wheat gluten. 

 

568DCC52-80DC-40DD-95E5-73DD6230DF87.thumb.jpeg.fbf289c17cb8d4739d8617d32af97e8f.jpeg

 

6DA1D2FA-14D2-4877-9E0C-085BA96E4F0D.thumb.jpeg.4ac00ec719c150ca3d9b9a527bae3554.jpeg

 

146DB459-DFDA-4BB1-939B-A70CFFE5DF57.thumb.jpeg.5910a4cb1956ad514761029d348cff29.jpeg

 

Waiting for them both to cool to get crumb shots.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

On the right the gluten free brioche.  On the left Shokupan made with modernists gluten free flour mix with added vital wheat gluten. 

Well, they look like bread. How is the texture?

  • Like 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ancient Grain Bread: Teff, Einkorn and Millet (KM p. 103)

 

This week's "ancient grain" entry uses predominantly einkorn (25%) with a little teff (5%) and a little millet flour (10%). The inclusion is chia seeds, and the topping is millet (which I went lighter on this time). Overall I didn't get much oven spring, so while the flavor was fine, the texture was a bit on the chewy side. Not a bad bread, but I probably won't rush out to make it again.

 

DSC_8232.jpg

 

DSC_8234.jpg

  • Like 7

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

Ancient Grain Bread: Teff, Einkorn and Millet (KM p. 103)

 

This week's "ancient grain" entry uses predominantly einkorn (25%) with a little teff (5%) and a little millet flour (10%). The inclusion is chia seeds, and the topping is millet (which I went lighter on this time). Overall I didn't get much oven spring, so while the flavor was fine, the texture was a bit on the chewy side. Not a bad bread, but I probably won't rush out to make it again.

 

DSC_8232.jpg

 

DSC_8234.jpg

Look good


http://igodl.com/blog

Make it a great day, put a smile on your face

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

Well, they look like bread. How is the texture?

Pretty darn good I must say!

 

I'm thinking Bostock with a couple of pieces of the brioche. I sliced both loaves up and put them in the freezer with the pieces divided with deli wrap. That way hubby can make himself a sandwich. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

Ancient Grain Bread: Teff, Einkorn and Millet (KM p. 103)

 

This week's "ancient grain" entry uses predominantly einkorn (25%) with a little teff (5%) and a little millet flour (10%). The inclusion is chia seeds, and the topping is millet (which I went lighter on this time). Overall I didn't get much oven spring, so while the flavor was fine, the texture was a bit on the chewy side. Not a bad bread, but I probably won't rush out to make it again.

 

DSC_8232.jpg

 

DSC_8234.jpg

Well, the LOOK pretty tasty to me!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could someone confirm that the recipe at the bottom of this article is the same from volume 5 for their everything everywhere bagels?

 

https://m.mic.com/articles/amp/185648/food-scientist-nathan-myrhvold-figured-out-how-to-keep-everything-bagel-toppings-from-falling-off

 

For those who have worked with this, how much slurry do you find you need to make for a recipe of bagel dough (1kg/7 bagels)? I need an idea of how much ultra Tex I need to be ordering... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Kmanim I didn't check the exact proportions, but that's the gist of it, anyway. You only need enough to get the bagels dipped, but it can be hard to deal with smaller quantities, so I typically make 1kg batches, as that recipe suggests. I'm sure you could get by with a half batch easily enough, though.

  • Thanks 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2019 at 6:19 PM, bos said:

I love bread 😋

ME too.  In fact, it’s disturbing just how much I love bread.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Okanagancook
      I was reminded the other day of the egg-in-plastic-wrap-poach method.
       
    • By Smokeydoke
      After a delightful brunch at Koslow's Sqirl restaurant in Los Angeles, I've decided to attempt to cook through her cookbook. I'll post my results here.
       
      Please follow along and join in, if you're so inclined. Her food is wonderful, but I will surmise that her true deliciousness comes from using the best and freshest ingredients. I'll do my best to recreate the magic I felt at Sqirl.
       
      Here's the link to her book at Eat Your Books.
    • By MSRadell
      GE is entering the SV field in an innovative way. They are doing a crowdfunding approach through one of their Innovation technology centers. The device itself is also innovative in that it uses a Inductive cooktop for the heating element with a wireless temperature sensor. It's also unique in that it does not include any type of water circulation.
       
      Here's a link to the crowdfunding site: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/paragon-induction-cooktop/
       
      What does everybody think about this entry into the field? If nothing else it certainly shows that SV has gotten the attention of major appliance makers. A few weeks ago GE also announced that one of their new lines of stoves will have the same type of temperature control as this device uses so you can do SV on your stovetop.
       
    • By Shelby
      Thanks to @blue_dolphin, I was forced to buy this cookbook  and it was delivered today.  No matter how hard I try, I just don't super enjoy cookbooks on my Kindle.  Anyway, I'll most likely be alone on this thread due to low okra likability lol, but I'm an only child and I'm used to being alone 😁
       
       

       
       First on the list will be the Kimchi Okra from page 100--as suggested by @blue_dolphin.
       
      I'll be back on this thread soon  
    • By Luke
      I made the Creme Anglaise recipe from Myhrvold Modernist Cuisine - it did look curdled and lumpy coming out of the zip lock bag as described in the recipe.
       
      I used my stick blender to smooth it out as instructed, but I think I blended it for too long, and it went from lumpy to smooth to watery. Did I make a fatal mistake of over blending the custard?
       
      The recipe does not say how to blend or when to stop.
       
      Hoping one of the gurus can give me guidance before I try this again.
       
      Many Thanks
      Luke
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...