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Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"


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On 11/24/2017 at 2:38 PM, Chris Hennes said:

Ha! It's not even the weekend yet, I'm just getting warmed up!

 

Today's real project was pretzels, in an attempt to get a more even coating. Here's that attempt:

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How were you able to get the coating so even? @Chris Hennes I've tried the preztel recipe a few times and mine never look as dark or as even as the book. 

 

Do I need to make a stronger lye solution than the book specifies?

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Edited by PositiveMD
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1 hour ago, PositiveMD said:

How were you able to get the coating so even? @Chris Hennes I've tried the preztel recipe a few times and mine never look as dark or as even as the book. 

I follow the book recipe exactly, though I ignore the time they give for baking to set the lye: I just bake until they look right. The evenness I think is just a function of how you dip them, and how you handle them (or don't handle them) coming out of the dip.

Chris Hennes
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chennes@egullet.org

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  • 1 month later...

Landbrot with Pressure-Caramelize Cherries and Almonds (KM p. 223)

 

I've posted about the Landbrot before: it's a very high-hydration "Farmer's Bread"-style loaf with a very large quantity of white flour levain, plus a relatively small amount of whole wheat flour and medium rye flour. In this ingredient variation you make 800g of that dough, then add 180g of pressure-caramelized dried cherries and almonds. The inclusion is delicious: in fact, my only objection is that I would have like more almonds. Like, a lot more. Next time I'll probably make something like 4x the quantity of almonds the recipe calls for, they have a great flavor and texture.

 

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Chris Hennes
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chennes@egullet.org

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For today's festival of Epiphany in Spain and the South of France, it is very common to eat Roscón de Reyes (King's bread). They are not easy to find in the UK, so we made it ourselves following a recipe from Modernist Bread (which is available for free online).

There are many different styles of Roscón. This time we decided to fill it with chestnut based cream since it pairs very well with orange blossom. 

 

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Edited by Objective Foodie
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Just now, Objective Foodie said:

For today's festival of Epiphany in Spain and the South of France, it is very common to eat Roscón de Reyes (King's bread). They are not easy to find them in the UK, thus we made it ourselves following the recipe from Modernist Bread (which is available for free online).

There are many different styles of Roscón, we decided to fill it with chestnut based cream since it pairs very well with orange blossom. 

I like the chestnut/orange pairing. Baby or bean inside?

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On 1/6/2021 at 9:33 PM, heidih said:

Did you get one of them? Here in US many are more familiar with the tradition from New Orleans that starts at Carnaval beginning 6 Jan to Mardi Gras. You might find this older topic amusing. Picture of a slice would be nice - of yours. https://forums.egullet.org/topic/37261-kingcakes/page/2/

 

It's fascinating to see how food and culture travel and adapt in different countries. Thanks for sharing that post @heidih ! I didn't know that there was a cinnamon and sugar variation and had never heard of cream cheese being used as a filling! 

In Europe King's cakes' main flavour is orange blossom and/or candied fruit (similar to panettoni). Citrus fruits are in season in January and they are used in many traditional Christmas dishes.

 

We did not take a photo of a slice unfortunately! However, we enjoyed it so much that will be making a smaller bun with the same brioche-like dough following a recipe from the famous Basque chef Martín Berasategui this weekend. We will certainly post a picture!

 

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