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BeeZee

Red wine suggestions needed

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I am looking for some ideas for a lighter red wine that would pair with grilled tuna steak which may be served with a mango salsa being brought by my friend (so I don't know how sweet or spicy it will be). That salsa is throwing me off. 


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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I'd be puzzled too.  Might a Gamay do the trick? It would be light and fruity; perhaps it would play well with the salsa. Otherwise I think I'd lean toward a GSM (Grenache/Syrah/Mourvedre) blend as it's a reliably good food companion in my book. I'll be watching this topic with interest and hoping someone with more pairing knowledge weighs in.


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Posted (edited)

shy not a rose w just a little sweetness in it ?

 

Ive been told that a little sweetness  in a wine goes w spicy food , that that would also cover a sl sweet sauce.

 

is there a TJ's near you ?   they seem to know more about their wines than most places.

 

Im sure you could get something nice enough for around 8 bucks

 

of course  chill the wine  : that covers many sins of wine < $ 15.00


Edited by rotuts (log)

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I am a fan of Williams Selyem Pinot's with seared tuna (assuming some accompanying flavours and not just a high quality piece of seared tuna - solo).  It has also worked in some scenarios with a full flavored ceviche (similar to a mango salad....sort of), but ultimately I would prefer a white for that pairing.

 

A fruity Pinot might fit your bill.

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Mark West Pinot seems to work well in settings like this. And I recently picked up a Bota Box dry rose that was respectable. Might not carry the tuna, though.

 


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thanks for the suggestions. My local TJ's does indeed have wine, so a trip is planned to see what they have. We also have a very nice wine store near my office that is a hidden secret (Moore Brothers Wine Co.), if I can un-bury myself on Thurs., I'll head over, as they are very knowledgeable. If I don't think I can find something suitable in a red, I'll just stick with white for dinner.


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A pinot noir would be great with the tuna alone, but the problem, as you pointed out, is the salsa: fruit, vegetable, and acid (and, I assume, some seasoning). Great to cut through the fat and richness and char of the tuna, but bad for wine pairing. I'd abandon the notion of a red and instead go with the best sauvignon blanc you can find.

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I'm with Rotuts on this, a Rose would be perfect with the dish you describe, particularly if the wine has a bit of residual sweetness to cope with any heat in the salsa.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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I'm playing golf with our friend on Saturday, I'll see if he can give insight into the flavor profile. My bet is on not so spicy.

Hubby is a fan of vinho verde, so that's an easy one. And I do like the idea of the rose.


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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so as it turned out, our guest who made the salsa (not spicy, just sweet from mango) brought a Riesling which went well. I had some indeterminate red blend that we opened that was actually OK. There was some Prosecco as well. Hey, if someone brings it, it gets opened. But I think a rose would have been nice (will file away for future ref).

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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@Norm Matthews,The salsa was more of a fresh relish, not vinegary or spicy, so it really was just a bit sweet from the mango and red bell pepper.


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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