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The Bread Topic (2016–)


DianaM
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On 5/25/2022 at 10:03 AM, Ann_T said:

that recipe also makes wonderful crusty buns.

 

@Ann_T Thought I might try making a batch of buns with your baguette dough recipe this weekend. I would want to use them for burgers - but I've never made burger buns before. Based on your comments above, do you think if I divided a 500g flour batch into 8 pieces, that would work? And how do I form and bake them? As individual balls on a stone? Flattened and cut out like biscuits and baked in some sort of dish? Sorry if these are stupid questions. 😊

 

Thank you in advance!

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Posted (edited)

@PatrickT, sorry I just saw you message.  I'm at work.  Yes, between 85 and 100g should work for burger buns.   

For burger buns I just shape them and put them on parchment lined baking sheet. For the smaller boules/rolls I usually bake them right on the stone.

 

Edited by Ann_T (log)
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9 hours ago, Dave R said:

@Ann_THow are you baking most of your bread now? I had thought you were using a CSO and I gather the Challenger is more for a conventional oven using a cover for part of the bake.

 

Edit: I remember someone at The Fresh Loaf using this glass baker as an alternative.

 

Dave

 

 

You are correct Dave.  I do bake most of my breads in the CSO , or I should say start them in the CSO on the Bread Steam setting and then after 10 minutes  I transfer them to the stone in the conventional oven.   This way I can bake 6 or 8 baguettes in half the time.  

 

This only works for smaller baguettes under 14" long.  For larger rounds/boules I will bake in a dutch oven, but I hate having to lower the dough into the high sides of the Dutch Oven.   You can bake two ovals or a couple of baguettes in the Challenger. And the lid has two handles making it easier to lift and the lid would weigh under 20 lbs.  I had another CT Scan last Wednesday and  found out that the dissected artery hasn't healed, it just has no blood flow.  So I am still not suppose to lift anything over 20 lbs so  the Challenger could work.   And besides, I really really like the way it looks.   

 

8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

About half the weight and half the price of an anova.

 

I know.  I've thought about the Anova but the price is off putting .  Even in  Canadian dollars the Challenger comes in with shipping and duty, just under $425.00

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@Ann_T Above all else, protect your health!

 

Now to the fun stuff. I certainly understand experimenting with a craft you love. If you think the Challenger is something you'd like to work with, then why not? I'm more of a nuts and bolts kind of baker and have used or owned just about every kind of mixer you can think of. I've never baked in the oven vessel style, but have seen plenty of beautiful loaves done that way. As a side note, for pizza I started using a pair of these gloves about a year ago. Well worth it, especially if handling 500° F iron.

 

As an alternative to the Challenger I've read on line that some are using a baking stone/steel with a restaurant pan over the loaves as a steam generator. Stainless works well and is obviously much lighter. Sizes of stone/steel and pan would vary based on what your home oven could handle.

 

If you get the Challenger I'd love to see some pictures of it in action.

 

Dave

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Are you happy with it?

The crumb looks and feels a bit dense. Rise was good but I don’t think I’ve been getting strong gluten development lately. 

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Early morning bake.
Started two 500g batches last night. One with 50g of sourdough discard and one with 1g of yeast. Left out on the counter all night.
 
At 4:00 AM, I divided the sourdough batch in half and shaped one 16" long baguette. The other half of the dough is Matt's to make a pizza.
Each piece just over 450g.
 
Divided the yeast dough into four small rounds. Each just over 200gs.
 
1789428803_SourdoughBaguetteandfoursmallregularBoulesMay30th2022.thumb.jpg.3d79b054cfa93c3e18afaebfe79779c0.jpg
 
Baked the sourdough baguette on the stone in the conventional oven
1651807849_Kitchenaideroastingpan.thumb.jpg.d51a8ea462afc2c9cf49f0a4b22c3326.jpg
 
covered with the bottom of a large KitchenAid roasting pan.
Captures the steam just like a Dutch Oven. Removed the lid after 15 minutes and finished baking uncovered.
1211662139_SourdoughBaguetteandfoursmallyeastBoulesMay30th2022.thumb.jpg.86b6b999cf51566f5ecd5a38851068b7.jpg
 
The four rounds were started in the CSO on the bread steam setting and then transferred after 10 minutes to the big oven.
 
The roasting pan isn't quite as cool as the Challenger, but it actually worked well.  I preheated the lid on the stone.
And it is long enough to make 16" baguettes.  I could probably bake two at a time.
 
Instead of the Challenger, I'm now leaning towards a Spun Iron Bread Cloche.  Will be about half the price of the Challenger
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20 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

and very light weight

I suspect you would make an incredibly good bread no matter what tools were at your disposal. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 5/26/2022 at 8:09 AM, ElsieD said:

Does anyone have a recipe for light rye bread?  Or point me to one on-line that you have used?  I have sourdough starter if needed.  Thanks!

Well. your post inspired me.  I picked the recipe for Seeded Rye Sandwich Bread for KA.  It's baking in my Zo as we 'speak' and the aroma is intoxicating.  

Take a look, it might be just what you're seeking/

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I have a pair of oven mitts with silicon "ribs" - they get a good grip on the overturned bowl with ease....

cabinet space, otoh, is in shorter supply (g)

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On 5/30/2022 at 3:51 PM, lindag said:

Well. your post inspired me.  I picked the recipe for Seeded Rye Sandwich Bread for KA.  It's baking in my Zo as we 'speak' and the aroma is intoxicating.  

Take a look, it might be just what you're seeking/

 

How was it?  I was feeling under the weather for a few days and it was during that time I needed the bread.  I ended up doing a recipe from the Zo booklet.  Didn't have a lot of rye flavour and for some reason, I didn't care for the texture.  Too cakey or something.

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16 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

How was it?  I was feeling under the weather for a few days and it was during that time I needed the bread.  I ended up doing a recipe from the Zo booklet.  Didn't have a lot of rye flavour and for some reason, I didn't care for the texture.  Too cakey or something.

It was amazing.  As I said, the aroma was fantastic as well as the flavor.  Will definitely make this again very soon.  I find rye bread to be pretty tricky; more difficult to get a good result than other types.  This one is definitely a keeper.

I hope you'll try it.

 

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On 5/31/2022 at 7:42 AM, AlaMoi said:

I have a pair of oven mitts with silicon "ribs" - they get a good grip on the overturned bowl with ease....

 

 

I have mitts like those too and they're the only kind I'll use.

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

My shaping and scoring skills are a little out of practice.

 

But I'm quite confident they tasted divine! 😃

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@JoNorvelleWalkeryour comment makes me wonder about baking schedules for the home bakers here. Do most of you also buy commercially made breads? Just curious. 

 

I eat a lot of bread. I bake (including griddle bakes of pita and tortillas) three or four times a week. I'm retired so I've got that going for me. And when I worked, I worked mostly from home so I always could take time to work with dough. But with the exception of tortillas at a Mexican restaurant, the last time I ate commercially produced bread was when I was in the hospital in 2006. 

 

I've mentioned before that I switched over to pan baking for bread at the end of last year, so I don't post a lot of pictures. Once you've seen one you've seen them all! I did finally get my part whole wheat Pullman loaf to where I wanted it a week or so ago so I'll post that. And I am working on a 40% rye Pullman loaf. Makes me want to buy pre sliced Swiss cheese just because they fit so perfectly with the slice of bread!

 

Dave

 

Pull1 5.28.22 web.JPG

Pull3 5.28.22 web.JPG

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I do buy a loaf of bread occasionally, mainly what is labeled "Belgian Bread" as it makes great grilled cheese sandwiches.  The bread crisps up really well and stays crispy.  DH will not eat whole wheat type breads, other than Dave's Killer Bread (thanks to @Smithy).  So I bake mainly white bread, make the dough in the bread machine but bake in the oven.  The fruit bread I make using my KA for the dough and then the S & F method.  I make this as per Peter Reinhart.  Once baked and cooled I slice and freeze them.  I only make these breads when the loaf is almost finished.

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