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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


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22 hours ago, beauxeault said:

I'm a little unclear about how to best incorporate the soap into the ice cream. Would I need extra thickener? How long should I cook it?

Best use an immersion blender....add more emulsifiers and stay away from safeguard the flavor profile isn’t worth the extra cost

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I came upon an interesting article or study and the conclusion was cooking at low temp long time and high temp short time had minimal effects on body and texture.  The more substantial factor on body and texture was the method of freezing..  

 

 

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5 minutes ago, ccp900 said:

I came upon an interesting article or study and the conclusion was cooking at low temp long time and high temp short time had minimal effects on body and texture.  The more substantial factor on body and texture was the method of freezing..  

 

 

 

How much effect is going to depend on the quantity of milk solids, and also their starting condition. If you're making a typical home recipe that has no added milk solids, and your milk is ultra-pasteurized, there won't be many proteins and they'll have already been cooked past what you'd want. So monkeying with your lower-temp cooking times will be a bit futile.

 

Re: soap in ice cream ... don't forget the advantages of easy cleanup.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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1 hour ago, paulraphael said:

 

How much effect is going to depend on the quantity of milk solids, and also their starting condition. If you're making a typical home recipe that has no added milk solids, and your milk is ultra-pasteurized, there won't be many proteins and they'll have already been cooked past what you'd want. So monkeying with your lower-temp cooking times will be a bit futile.

 

Re: soap in ice cream ... don't forget the advantages of easy cleanup.

Here’s the link paul

 

https://www.journalofdairyscience.org/article/S0022-0302(43)92691-8/pdf

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3 hours ago, ccp900 said:

 

That's an interesting old study. I actually had a copy in my pile of digital papers. It's one of the more thorough published papers on this topic—along with some of the earlier papers that it tries to refute.

 

It's important to consider specificity in science. This paper looked for specific effects under four different combinations of time and temperature. The earlier papers that came to different conclusions were looking at somewhat different effects, and were looking at different combinations of time and temperature. It's not surprising that they came to different conclusions. I pasteurize at 75°C for 30 to 45 minutes; this is outside the range looked at by these researchers.

 

Commercial ice cream manufacturers have become quite sophisticated at manipulating time and temperature. Jenni Britton Bauer uses protein denaturization to get custard-like textures without eggs. Haagen Dazs uses it to make retail ice cream without stabilizers. There are many possibilities. 

 

The sad part is that most of the ice cream-specific research has been done by manufacturers and is proprietary. Haagen Dazs publish in science journals; they keep secrets. Britton-Bauer said she figured it out with the help of some hints from university researchers—probably ones who had worked on commercial projects.

Notes from the underbelly

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4 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

That's an interesting old study. I actually had a copy in my pile of digital papers. It's one of the more thorough published papers on this topic—along with some of the earlier papers that it tries to refute.

 

It's important to consider specificity in science. This paper looked for specific effects under four different combinations of time and temperature. The earlier papers that came to different conclusions were looking at somewhat different effects, and were looking at different combinations of time and temperature. It's not surprising that they came to different conclusions. I pasteurize at 75°C for 30 to 45 minutes; this is outside the range looked at by these researchers.

 

Commercial ice cream manufacturers have become quite sophisticated at manipulating time and temperature. Jenni Britton Bauer uses protein denaturization to get custard-like textures without eggs. Haagen Dazs uses it to make retail ice cream without stabilizers. There are many possibilities. 

 

The sad part is that most of the ice cream-specific research has been done by manufacturers and is proprietary. Haagen Dazs publish in science journals; they keep secrets. Britton-Bauer said she figured it out with the help of some hints from university researchers—probably ones who had worked on commercial projects.

Wonderful hobby we happened to take interest in. Who knew making ice cream was this involved hehehehehe

Edited by ccp900 (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

So Significant Eater spots these “baby” bananas on the counter. She loathes regular bananas. She jests: “Wow. Are you making Bananas Foster with those?” Wasn’t planning to, but what the fuck. Ice cream was already on hand. Madagascar bourbon vanilla and George Howell coffee Philadelphia-style ice creams made Saturday. Yesterday - Bananas Foster.

 

166750738_Bananasfoster09-27.jpeg.d9433a25220c0accbffaa1c2c3b259a9.jpeg

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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On 9/28/2020 at 7:56 PM, weinoo said:

So Significant Eater spots these “baby” bananas on the counter. She loathes regular bananas. She jests: “Wow. Are you making Bananas Foster with those?” Wasn’t planning to, but what the fuck. Ice cream was already on hand. Madagascar bourbon vanilla and George Howell coffee Philadelphia-style ice creams made Saturday. Yesterday - Bananas Foster.

 

166750738_Bananasfoster09-27.jpeg.d9433a25220c0accbffaa1c2c3b259a9.jpeg

Looks amazing man

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  • 2 weeks later...

No new information but I must put in another mention of Rose's chocolate.  Three batches so far.  With a couple of my tweaks to the recipe, it remains the finest ice cream I have eaten.

 

I've also made her blueberry, good but too much fat on the palate; and coconut, OK but not really worth repeating.

 

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On 10/8/2020 at 4:45 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

No new information but I must put in another mention of Rose's chocolate.  Three batches so far.  With a couple of my tweaks to the recipe, it remains the finest ice cream I have eaten.

 

 

+1 for Roses Chocolate Ice Cream! What tweaks did you make? I have found her other ice creams not so great, too sweet for my tastes. I do understand most Americans like Ice Cream on the sweeter side.

 

I've just made a batch of silky smooth roasted hazelnut paste in the wet grinder and now I'm pulling together a Roasted Hazelnut Ice Cream recipe....

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1 hour ago, Luke said:

 

+1 for Roses Chocolate Ice Cream! What tweaks did you make? I have found her other ice creams not so great, too sweet for my tastes. I do understand most Americans like Ice Cream on the sweeter side.

 

I've just made a batch of silky smooth roasted hazelnut paste in the wet grinder and now I'm pulling together a Roasted Hazelnut Ice Cream recipe....

 

I cook all the mix except for the chocolate, and I use real cream, not ultra pasteurized.  I don't add expresso powder (though I might add some if I had it).  Importantly I homogenize the mix before blast chilling.

 

I'd love to see what you come up with for hazelnut.

 

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This has become one of my favorites. Our local food coop has had really fresh hazelnuts lately . A vitamix does a great grinding them. I'm sure a mill would be smoother, but I'm sure there'd be a difference in the ice cream.

 

120g toasted hazelnut butter (65% fat)

         (make a larger batch so it will blend easily)

 

570g whole milk (3.3% fat)

120g heavy cream (36% fat)

 

75g skim milk powder

60g granulated sugar

45g dextrose

20g fructose

 

2g soy lecithin (get really good quality stuff that's super bland, or leave it out. Willpowder's version is good)

1.5g pre-blended stabilizer or:

        0.86g locust bean gum

        0.43g guar gum

        0.21g lambda carrageenan

1.5g salt

 

 

The idea here is lots of hazelnuts, balanced by reduced milk fat and zero egg fat. Also the sugar combination is jiggered around to compensate for the hardening properties of the hazelnut oil. 

 

 

 

Total Fat: 14%

Milk Fat: 6.2%

Total Solids: 42.1%

Solids Nonfat: 28.1%

Milk Solids Nonfat: 12.4%

Stabilizer/Water: 0.26%

POD: 118 / 1000g

PAC: 223 / 1000g

Absolute PAC: 509 / 1000g

Rel. Hardness @ -14°C: 75

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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@Luke another difference from Rose's method is I stir the egg yolks with the dry ingredients before adding the milk and cream.

 

A comment my son made, that I observed also, is the ice cream from this recipe doesn't taste cold.  Although of course it is.  My daughter in law added it doesn't coat your mouth like their most recent ice cream.

 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

676131963_Icecream12-07.thumb.jpeg.bf01a341f574664dbd5671855def1f7b.jpeg

 

I must've ground the coffee beans at a different setting than the last few times, as even after the base was strained, there were some solids in the ice cream; actually not a bad thing, as this batch was delish. I scoop like I plate.

 

Making 2/3 of the recipe amounts in Dana's book, we got two nights of scooped and "plated" ice cream. On night 3, we each get spoons and eat the remainder right out of the container, like the heathens we really are.

 

The Whynter does a fine job.

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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On 9/16/2020 at 5:15 PM, paulraphael said:

My project over the last few years has been capturing all the dimensions of a flavor ingredient. I want to get all those bright and fresh garden mint flavors, just like I want to get all the nuances of single-origin coffees and chocolates. We're used to ice cream that has a generic coffee ice cream flavor, or a generic chocolate ice cream flavor, or a generic mint extract flavor. 

 

I missed the replies back then.
There are other ways to get the flavor of fragile herbs like mint and basil. You can include them in the mix without recurring to infusing. With a pacojet it's pretty easy, you prepare your ice-cream base, let it cool, add the herbs, pour in the pacojet canisters and freeze. The machine will grind them ultrafinely when you will pacotize your frozen base and you'll get the true taste of the herbs because the herbs are there whole. Without a pacojet you can quickly blanch the herbs to avoid oxidation troubles, then add some cold water (preferably with a bit of acid) and grind them to get a puree. You need a powerful blender like a Vitamix or a Thermomix to get a really fine puree. When you have the puree you just add it to the ice-cream base after chilling it (and before churning). Of course if you use this puree method then you need to re-balance your ice-cream recipe since you are adding water and some solids, but you already know this. You can prepare a good quantity of this puree during the hot season and freeze it, so you can make the ice-cream the rest of the year.
With sturdier herbs (rosemary, thyme, savory...) I would keep going with the infusion method.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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On 9/15/2020 at 9:19 PM, beauxeault said:

 

I'd be interested in your thoughts about best methods for using lavender.

 

Lavender flowers are a troubling b**ch.
They vary a lot from producer to producer and with time, you can't standardize your recipe because you will get different results each time, so you need to base everything on your taste memory.
When infusing them the risk of getting a bitter result is really high. If the infusion temperature is over 70°C then you are pretty screwed. If you try cold infusion then you are screwed too, at least in my experience. I don't know the chemical reasons, I never researched which aromatic molecules are involved. I think you get the best results between 50°C and 60°C, leaving the flowers for few minutes and tasting constantly, then straining. Don't press too much, or you will start getting a bitter infusion.
The third problem is that they absorb a lot of liquids, they have a huge surface area and fats tend to remain attached to them. So the amount of liquids that are lost during the infusion vary a lot from time to time. And it's impossible to have an idea of how much water was lost and how much fat was lost, even this ratio varies a lot. So unless you have access to a lab you will be left with a blind guess on what to add to get back to your desired amount and you will risk to throw your recipe off balance. This is a major trouble especially when making a ganache for a chocolate bonbon.
In the past years I switched to essential oil for lavender. Much much easier to use and even a cleaner taste. Beware it's really strong, a single drop goes a long way.

 

You can use the leaves of the lavender plant as well, they have a licorice-like taste. Use them as you use rosemary. At least this is my experience with the local variety of lavender, can't say about the one that is in your hands.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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  • 3 weeks later...

Now that I have a Blendtec I decided to test the assertion that it was possible to make ice cream in a blender.  I basically followed the everythingkitchens frozen fruit ice cream recipe:

 

https://www.everythingkitchens.com/how-to-make-ice-cream-blendtec.html

 

I omitted the vanilla and snuck in a bit more cream.  And added a drop or two of polysorbate 80 just because.  If you didn't know already, condensed milk is a pain to work with.  My main complaint is that on the ice cream cycle the machine could not fully pulverize the seeds of the frozen blackberries.

 

That being said, the result was a refreshingly pleasant blackberry ice cream.  One that I would make again.  (Maybe without condensed milk.)  I suspect I would have had better results if I'd pulverized the berries first, and then froze the puree.  My teeth have trouble with seeds.

 

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Now that I have a Blendtec I decided to test the assertion that it was possible to make ice cream in a blender.  I basically followed the everythingkitchens frozen fruit ice cream recipe:

 

https://www.everythingkitchens.com/how-to-make-ice-cream-blendtec.html

 

I omitted the vanilla and snuck in a bit more cream.  And added a drop or two of polysorbate 80 just because.  If you didn't know already, condensed milk is a pain to work with.  My main complaint is that on the ice cream cycle the machine could not fully pulverize the seeds of the frozen blackberries.

 

That being said, the result was a refreshingly pleasant blackberry ice cream.  One that I would make again.  (Maybe without condensed milk.)  I suspect I would have had better results if I'd pulverized the berries first, and then froze the puree.  My teeth have trouble with seeds.

 

 

What if you pureed the berries first and then run them through a food mill to extract the seeds?  Or maybe that's what you meant?

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10 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

What if you pureed the berries first and then run them through a food mill to extract the seeds?  Or maybe that's what you meant?

 

Putting the berries through a food mill is the easy way, or at least the sensical way.  I meant run the berries long enough in the blender to pulverize the seeds prior to freezing.  I am still sitting here picking seeds from my poor teeth.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/29/2020 at 10:13 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Now that I have a Blendtec I decided to test the assertion that it was possible to make ice cream in a blender.  I basically followed the everythingkitchens frozen fruit ice cream recipe:

 

https://www.everythingkitchens.com/how-to-make-ice-cream-blendtec.html

 

I've had a Blendtec for quite a few years and, until reading this, never noticed that it had an "Ice Cream" button.  I had some milk in the fridge that tasted fine but was past it's "best by" date so this recipe's frozen milk cubes was a good use for it.  I also had some of the best O'Henry peaches of the summer stashed in the freezer so I made some peach ice cream. 

My only issue was that once the blades started to turn, 9 of the cubes quickly aligned themselves into a neat 3 x 3 shelf that supported several of the remaining cubes and the fruit about midway up the blender jar.  Next time, I'll either drop the cubes and fruit in after starting the cycle or try using the Wildside jar.  

But I will try it again.  I often end up with unused milk about to turn.  Usually it goes into whole milk ricotta but now I have another use. 

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