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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


Darienne
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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

No fancy quenelles for me!

Indeed. By the time it gets where it’s going it will all look the same.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

No fancy quenelles for me!

 

Evidently not!  Oh, to be an old ice cream machine...

 

(Philly style, or custard based?? Enquiring minds...)

Edited by weinoo (log)

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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9 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Evidently not!  Oh, to be an old ice cream machine...

 

(Philly style, or custard based?? Enquiring minds...)

Sort of a bastardized custard - I make a custard out of 1 yolk and some milk - put whole eggs, cocoa powder and sugar in thermomix and pour the hot custard in, then add cream, milk and a bit of vanilla. 

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17 hours ago, weinoo said:

This is the one I have...https://www.whynter.com/product/whynter-2-1-quart-upright-ice-cream-maker-stainless-steel-bowl-black/

 

It's 180 watts, but I don't think that's as important as maybe the design, etc.

 

From the specs, it gets cold enough, but I'm no engineer so I have no idea how that translates to the spinning power of the dasher.  

 

Makes delicious ice cream, and like most kitchen appliances, as one learns how to get the most out of a product, it becomes easier and more friendly to use.

 

Indeed. That one is good. It has a good freezer, although I dont know why they reduced so much the speed of the dasher on top models. Same happens with the cuisinart. It spins at half speed compared to the lower model, but it has better freezing power, and probably better churning strength

Anyway its like you say, you have to make the proper recipe, and the all the procedures the right way in order to get the best ice cream

My last batch ended up extremely well, and I'm not using emulsifiers yet, but it looks like proper ice cream already. I have to work a little with the taste, as its still a little "milky", but I'm close

I will post photos later. As soon as I get some emulsifier, probably monoesterate, it should improve even more. I don't think that is the issue, but I have to consider that the milky flavor could come from the lack of emulsifier, due to the ingredients not mixing entirely. As the formula is correct as I checked with many many resources

 

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7 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

IMG_3502.thumb.JPG.7be95a79a49f6711c4bb95a4328068d0.JPG

 

IMG_3504.thumb.JPG.eea796dab394a3e9e5e309e156a7272f.JPG

 

IMG_3509.thumb.JPG.19a7bce3933fd9dc8c5864edbe8dbc96.JPG

 

No fancy quenelles for me!

 

 

Are you using stabilizers?

Is the second photo when you retrieve the mix from the machine, before freezing it?

Are you using a mixer to homogenize everything before churning?

Lots of questions xD

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8 minutes ago, Synerge said:

 

Are you using stabilizers?

Is the second photo when you retrieve the mix from the machine, before freezing it?

Are you using a mixer to homogenize everything before churning?

Lots of questions xD

 

I can attest for Kerry that she has an homogenizer.

 

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7 hours ago, Synerge said:

 

Are you using stabilizers?

Is the second photo when you retrieve the mix from the machine, before freezing it?

Are you using a mixer to homogenize everything before churning?

Lots of questions xD

No stabilizers, yes second photo where I dig it out before putting in freezer - leaving my homogenizer in the drawer!

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

Is there any need to use an homogenizer when starting with homogenized milk?

 

I don't believe I use any emulsifiers either. I've pretty much settled on Dana Cree's methodology.

 

 

Tell me more about Dana Cree's methods?

 

 

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36 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Tell me more about Dana Cree's methods?

For each of 4 frozen styles of confection, she has a blank slate recipe, which I like. (Custard, Philadelphia style, sherbet, yogurt). Thgen each of those chapters has a number of recipes based on different flavorings.

 

She goes pretty exhaustively into the science of ice cream, in ways which I can almost understand. And then more so into ratios, percentages, etc. etc. 

 

She allows to use any one of four "texture agents" in her recipes (commercial stabilizer, gums, tapioca starch or cornstarch).

 

And they just come out damn good to my taste.  Here is a sample custard recipe...https://www.fodmapeveryday.com/recipes/vanilla-ice-cream/

 

And a Philly style one...https://foodcrumbles.com/philadelphia-style-ice-cream-an-eggless-chocolate-ice-cream/

 

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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12 hours ago, weinoo said:

Is there any need to use an homogenizer when starting with homogenized milk?

 

I don't believe I use any emulsifiers either. I've pretty much settled on Dana Cree's methodology.

 

 

 

Homogenizer, not really. Not even ice cream shops use them. They are only used on industrial scale

But all of them use Mixers. Doesn't matter if the milk is homogenized, what you want to do is actually do a really good mixing, where everything becomes one thing, or you will notice how ingredients split. And its quite a difference to be honest, before I got my mixer to now that I use it

I actually homogenize the mix a few times as recommended in some books, and thats it, first for the liquids and then when you add the solids at max speed. Then when you have the mix at 85ºc when pasteurizing, and one more time, a fast one when you are about to put it in the machine, so you are sure that there are no harden surfaces due to contact with air while it was in the refrigerator

 

About emulsifiers, they are needed because milk fat and water reject each other. They are basically oil and water, you cannot blend them together, so you need an emulsifier as it absorbs the water drops and it binds fat with water, and the result is far better. The basic emulsifier, and the only one that was used and known some years ago are the eggs. Then you have lecitine. And then you go to monodiglicerides and monoesterates, and their complexity is in that order aswell. All the pro ice creams use monodiglicerides, but they are really hard to get, at least here, in small amounts. They are basically for industrial use

 

But well, I've been doing the ice creams with great results without using emulsifiers, but I will get some as soon as I go to the main city. I do use stabilizers though, 3 of them actually, carrube, guar and carrageenan in really small accounts, 2.5g total. They are all natural anyway, as they are got from plants

Every single step and addition matters to the quality of the ice cream, be it in texture and in flavor. Some are also for longevity, as you can have the ice cream for many days, weeks, even months without losing its structure. If you dont use any, it wont last more than 2 days I believe. I know its not common to have the ice cream for many days, many consume the batch in one single day. For me it lasts some days as I live alone and I only do 1 flavor at the time, so you get tired rather quickly

 

So yeah, I recommend using a mixer, is like 1 minute and it improves the mix a lot in general. Emulsifiers and stabilizers are optional. They depend on how good you want your ice cream to be, or if you are like me, that even when not doing it commercially, I'm putting lot of time and effort on this as I really like it, so I'm trying to achieve a professional result as much as I can

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11 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

No stabilizers, yes second photo where I dig it out before putting in freezer - leaving my homogenizer in the drawer!

 

And its it good? I mean the taste and texture

I'm asking because the second picture, when the ice cream has finished churning, looks too soft and a little grainy. With that I mean that its surface is not smooth, but it looks that it had balls that could be sugar or something else

The final result doesn't look grainy, but maybe a little dry? Its like the oposite appearance xD

It could be completely ok in both matters though, despite on how it looks, thats why I asked

 

I have made some batches that looked like that, but I believe it changed when I started homogenizing the mix. The stabilizers could have help. Not sure

 

For example look at this texture when it comes out of the machine. This is obviously the most perfect texture you can actually get, and its impossible for us because we dont have the right equipment, but its a guide of what we could aspire to achieve, or well, somewhat close to that

 

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/00/97/55/00975594f3a303dbe813b4cbd9b0c84d.jpg

For some reason I cannot post any image. I dont see any button for that. Maybe its because of my post count?

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6 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

If I haven't convinced people to homogenize their mix by now I suppose never will.

 

 

You won't convince me. But... Ms. Cree and Jeni both make you homogenized if I were to buy and use Creamline milk.

 

Or when I start entering competitions, which will happen never. 

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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14 hours ago, Synerge said:

  

 

And its it good? I mean the taste and texture

I'm asking because the second picture, when the ice cream has finished churning, looks too soft and a little grainy. With that I mean that its surface is not smooth, but it looks that it had balls that could be sugar or something else

The final result doesn't look grainy, but maybe a little dry? Its like the oposite appearance xD

It could be completely ok in both matters though, despite on how it looks, thats why I asked

 

I have made some batches that looked like that, but I believe it changed when I started homogenizing the mix. The stabilizers could have help. Not sure

 

For example look at this texture when it comes out of the machine. This is obviously the most perfect texture you can actually get, and its impossible for us because we dont have the right equipment, but its a guide of what we could aspire to achieve, or well, somewhat close to that

 

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/00/97/55/00975594f3a303dbe813b4cbd9b0c84d.jpg

For some reason I cannot post any image. I dont see any button for that. Maybe its because of my post count?

yes it is

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What is confounding on this and many specialty food threads (eg pizza) is that we each have in mind's eye a model we consider perfect, a goal.    And they are each idiosyncratic.   Like the original shaggy dog story. 

eGullet member #80.

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5 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

"You won't convince me. But... Ms. Cree and Jeni both make you homogenized if I were to buy and use Creamline milk."

 

I have been incorporating the Kalona Dairy non-homogenized product line into Dana's recipes and am experiencing buttering difficulties. Are there any steps I'm missing that might lessen this effect?

 

Edited by rascali (log)
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6 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

You won't convince me. But... Ms. Cree and Jeni both make you homogenized if I were to buy and use Creamline milk.

 

Or when I start entering competitions, which will happen never. 

 

Are you entering competitions? Of ice cream making?

I completely missed the point here xD

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2 hours ago, rascali said:

I have been incorporating the Kalona Dairy non-homogenized product line into Dana's recipes and am experiencing buttering difficulties. Are there any steps I'm missing that might lessen this effect?

 

Homogenization?

 

1 hour ago, Synerge said:

Are you entering competitions? Of ice cream making?

I completely missed the point here xD

 

No.  The point a few of us are making and have made here is that what's good and delicious for me, maybe you don't like as much? Or maybe that there is not any "best" this or "best" that after all?

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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21 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Homogenization?

 

 

No.  The point a few of us are making and have made here is that what's good and delicious for me, maybe you don't like as much? Or maybe that there is not any "best" this or "best" that after all?

 

That happens with basically everything. Probably the point for most of the people that make ice creams at home is to actually change the recipes and adapt them to their own liking

For me its something different. The gelatos that are made in my country are way too good, so the reason is price, it cost me about 1/5 1/6 of the price of the gelato shop, and thats a lot. I also like all this. Although I find the entire pasteurization and rapid freezing process exhausting and messy. The aging and churning process is rather simple

 

I do understand everyones points of view and reasons, but mostly for flavor. For texture, I dont think you can go better than what a pro machine can offer. Its extremely smooth. And if you talk about overrun (air), you can control that, so there is really much point on arguing about that

I dont know, for me its always trying to improve and get better. And no, I'm not talking about appareance, as I'm not a gourmet chef, unless it looks disgusting, there is no point on working on that, flavor and texture are everything in ice cream

 

I think I will go for a banana ice cream next, and a lemon sorbet as I bought way too many lemons :P. Sorbets are usually the hardest to make, specially those that have really low solid percentage like lemon

A really good advice that I found while trying, is to freeze the mix before churning as much as possible. If you can, leave it in the freezer until it reaches 0ºc before putting it in the machine. The result will be much better, as it will reach the desired temp a lot faster and the machine will suffer less. That means smaller ice crystals, and better texture as soon as you get it out of the machine

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1 hour ago, Synerge said:

For texture, I dont think you can go better than what a pro machine can offer. Its extremely smooth.

 

I think I do pretty well at home, my ice cream is very smooth and I'd also be willing to say that it's better than some of what's offered professionally. 

 

I'm not doing better than Il Lab, but I like my ice cream more than Ben & Jerry's, for example.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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