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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


Darienne
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This has become one of my favorites. Our local food coop has had really fresh hazelnuts lately . A vitamix does a great grinding them. I'm sure a mill would be smoother, but I'm sure there'd be a difference in the ice cream.

 

120g toasted hazelnut butter (65% fat)

         (make a larger batch so it will blend easily)

 

570g whole milk (3.3% fat)

120g heavy cream (36% fat)

 

75g skim milk powder

60g granulated sugar

45g dextrose

20g fructose

 

2g soy lecithin (get really good quality stuff that's super bland, or leave it out. Willpowder's version is good)

1.5g pre-blended stabilizer or:

        0.86g locust bean gum

        0.43g guar gum

        0.21g lambda carrageenan

1.5g salt

 

 

The idea here is lots of hazelnuts, balanced by reduced milk fat and zero egg fat. Also the sugar combination is jiggered around to compensate for the hardening properties of the hazelnut oil. 

 

 

 

Total Fat: 14%

Milk Fat: 6.2%

Total Solids: 42.1%

Solids Nonfat: 28.1%

Milk Solids Nonfat: 12.4%

Stabilizer/Water: 0.26%

POD: 118 / 1000g

PAC: 223 / 1000g

Absolute PAC: 509 / 1000g

Rel. Hardness @ -14°C: 75

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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@Luke another difference from Rose's method is I stir the egg yolks with the dry ingredients before adding the milk and cream.

 

A comment my son made, that I observed also, is the ice cream from this recipe doesn't taste cold.  Although of course it is.  My daughter in law added it doesn't coat your mouth like their most recent ice cream.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ooooh...

 

IMG_2710.jpeg.c89a96ec573c12ef97befd692749eafc.jpeg

 

Arrived yesterday.  

 

146050115_WhynterIceCreamMachine.jpeg.936ace9bf852565533679e2d60f9d1c1.jpeg

 

Unboxed, cleaned, and ready for action. (Keeping my fingers crossed). I've gifted my now 16-year old Lello 4070 Gelato Junior to an old friend.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Our first spin together...

 

E24A2167-D8C4-4973-BB7D-B84121018A2A.thumb.jpeg.8545d42594d8f73f5b41befdcbc8bdcb.jpeg

 

I’m a simple vanilla, Philadelphia-style ice cream guy.  
 

The Whynter spins fast...I mean the dasher spins so much faster than my old Lello Gelato junior.  Makes sense, I guess. Good ice cream, no crystals.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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  • 2 weeks later...
4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

If I had a blender I'd give her pumpkin recipe a try.

 

 

I wouldn't sweat the blender part, just use the beater (when the mixture is thick), then whisk (when it gets thinner), on your stand mixer.  Personally I wouldn't sweat adding the pumpkin either. I would just make a normal vanilla base (maybe using brown sugar instead of white - but then I hate un-clumping brown sugar so I would actually just add a touch of molasses to the white sugar), then add the spices and some yellow and red food coloring (to get orange). The spices are the key to pumpkin pie flavor, not the pumpkin.   And as Chris points out, this will freeze hard.  I always use a tbs (per pint of mix) of food grade, plant-based glycerin to keep that from happening.  It's nature's antifreeze!

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Mark

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9 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

it's not quite ice cream season here

 

When is ice cream season?

Russia is or was the largest consumer of ice cream in the world and mostly eats it in winter. The vendors set up stalls by the roadside with huge block of icecream, but no refrigeration other than that supplied by nature.  I remember buying ice cream in Moscow when it was -18°C (just under O°F) . It was wonderful.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

When is ice cream season?
 

 

Year-round!  I personally love ice cream in the winter...and if going out for ice cream to a favorite place (Il Lab, say, back before the confinement), it's way less crowded in the winter!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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3 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Year-round!  I personally love ice cream in the winter...and if going out for ice cream to a favorite place (Il Lab, say, back before the confinement), it's way less crowded in the winter!

 

Not in any Russian equivalent.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Some winters ago I picked up a State sponsored pamphlet at the state park about a mile from here.  The state says to eat ice cream to stay warm in the cold.  This is New Jersey, I'm sure someone in the park service was paid off.

 

 

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

676131963_Icecream12-07.thumb.jpeg.bf01a341f574664dbd5671855def1f7b.jpeg

 

I must've ground the coffee beans at a different setting than the last few times, as even after the base was strained, there were some solids in the ice cream; actually not a bad thing, as this batch was delish. I scoop like I plate.

 

Making 2/3 of the recipe amounts in Dana's book, we got two nights of scooped and "plated" ice cream. On night 3, we each get spoons and eat the remainder right out of the container, like the heathens we really are.

 

The Whynter does a fine job.

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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On 9/16/2020 at 5:15 PM, paulraphael said:

My project over the last few years has been capturing all the dimensions of a flavor ingredient. I want to get all those bright and fresh garden mint flavors, just like I want to get all the nuances of single-origin coffees and chocolates. We're used to ice cream that has a generic coffee ice cream flavor, or a generic chocolate ice cream flavor, or a generic mint extract flavor. 

 

I missed the replies back then.
There are other ways to get the flavor of fragile herbs like mint and basil. You can include them in the mix without recurring to infusing. With a pacojet it's pretty easy, you prepare your ice-cream base, let it cool, add the herbs, pour in the pacojet canisters and freeze. The machine will grind them ultrafinely when you will pacotize your frozen base and you'll get the true taste of the herbs because the herbs are there whole. Without a pacojet you can quickly blanch the herbs to avoid oxidation troubles, then add some cold water (preferably with a bit of acid) and grind them to get a puree. You need a powerful blender like a Vitamix or a Thermomix to get a really fine puree. When you have the puree you just add it to the ice-cream base after chilling it (and before churning). Of course if you use this puree method then you need to re-balance your ice-cream recipe since you are adding water and some solids, but you already know this. You can prepare a good quantity of this puree during the hot season and freeze it, so you can make the ice-cream the rest of the year.
With sturdier herbs (rosemary, thyme, savory...) I would keep going with the infusion method.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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On 9/15/2020 at 9:19 PM, beauxeault said:

 

I'd be interested in your thoughts about best methods for using lavender.

 

Lavender flowers are a troubling b**ch.
They vary a lot from producer to producer and with time, you can't standardize your recipe because you will get different results each time, so you need to base everything on your taste memory.
When infusing them the risk of getting a bitter result is really high. If the infusion temperature is over 70°C then you are pretty screwed. If you try cold infusion then you are screwed too, at least in my experience. I don't know the chemical reasons, I never researched which aromatic molecules are involved. I think you get the best results between 50°C and 60°C, leaving the flowers for few minutes and tasting constantly, then straining. Don't press too much, or you will start getting a bitter infusion.
The third problem is that they absorb a lot of liquids, they have a huge surface area and fats tend to remain attached to them. So the amount of liquids that are lost during the infusion vary a lot from time to time. And it's impossible to have an idea of how much water was lost and how much fat was lost, even this ratio varies a lot. So unless you have access to a lab you will be left with a blind guess on what to add to get back to your desired amount and you will risk to throw your recipe off balance. This is a major trouble especially when making a ganache for a chocolate bonbon.
In the past years I switched to essential oil for lavender. Much much easier to use and even a cleaner taste. Beware it's really strong, a single drop goes a long way.

 

You can use the leaves of the lavender plant as well, they have a licorice-like taste. Use them as you use rosemary. At least this is my experience with the local variety of lavender, can't say about the one that is in your hands.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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  • 2 weeks later...
8 hours ago, ElsieD said:

So....I finally got my act together and made Rose Levy Beranbaum's mango ice cream.  It time I ever used cornstarch and glucose.  It's delicious.

20201222_140040.jpg

 

Did you find the mango brand she calls for?

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Did you find the mango brand she calls for?

 

 

No, I couldn't find it anywhere.  The brand I got was Ashoka from India.  It is from Alphonso mangos.  I wondered if I could buy ripe Ataulfo mangos and make the pulp myself?  I could blitz it in the Vitamix and strain any bits out.  Any thoughts on that?  BTW the texture of this ice cream is lovely.  Almost enough to make me want to go out and buy the book.

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2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

 

No, I couldn't find it anywhere.  The brand I got was Ashoka from India.  It is from Alphonso mangos.  I wondered if I could buy ripe Ataulfo mangos and make the pulp myself?  I could blitz it in the Vitamix and strain any bits out.  Any thoughts on that?  BTW the texture of this ice cream is lovely.  Almost enough to make me want to go out and buy the book.

 

I have no experience with mango pulp but you should try her chocolate!  Now that I have a blender I am hoping to make pumpkin this weekend.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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3 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I have no experience with mango pulp but you should try her chocolate!  Now that I have a blender I am hoping to make pumpkin this weekend.

 

 

I probably would if I had the recipe.

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