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Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )


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14 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Who you calling cheap?

 

Not you, Mitch! Maybe easy, but never cheap ;)

 

I think of Ghiradelli as cheap because they have it at the supermarket around the corner. It's not like the Michel Cluizel stuff I have special order, and then stash locked up underneath my most boring financial documents, to keep it safe from certain other household members.

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Notes from the underbelly

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15 hours ago, teonzo said:

Glad you liked it!

For a 1 kg batch I use 30 g of mint.

I would suggest you to try the sorbet version.

 

 

 

Teo

 

 

That makes sense. Do you use just the leaves or are there any small stems still attached? I think both my garden containers together would be cleaned out if I harvested 30g of leaves. They're very light!

 

I've been on a drawn out quest to find the best extraction method for different kinds of herbs. It's challenging because there's practically no science on this. Not even rigorous blind tastings and experiments by chefs. Some herbs are pretty durable and taste good no matter what you do, but the delicate ones like mint and basil are mostly surrounded by a lot of dubious lore.

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20 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

That makes sense. Do you use just the leaves or are there any small stems still attached? I think both my garden containers together would be cleaned out if I harvested 30g of leaves. They're very light!

 

I've been on a drawn out quest to find the best extraction method for different kinds of herbs. It's challenging because there's practically no science on this. Not even rigorous blind tastings and experiments by chefs. Some herbs are pretty durable and taste good no matter what you do, but the delicate ones like mint and basil are mostly surrounded by a lot of dubious lore.

CAn you press them and make some sort of oil?

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20 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

That makes sense. Do you use just the leaves or are there any small stems still attached? I think both my garden containers together would be cleaned out if I harvested 30g of leaves. They're very light!

 

I've been on a drawn out quest to find the best extraction method for different kinds of herbs. It's challenging because there's practically no science on this. Not even rigorous blind tastings and experiments by chefs. Some herbs are pretty durable and taste good no matter what you do, but the delicate ones like mint and basil are mostly surrounded by a lot of dubious lore.

 

Well maybe, since most herb ice cream sucks, end the quest?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

Well maybe, since most herb ice cream sucks, end the quest?

 

I've had great luck with thyme, and also done pretty well with basil (although I haven't tried the latter in years. The basil I've been growing tastes terrible). 

 

My current thinking is that different methods work well for herbs with small sturdy leaves (thyme varieties, lavender, rosemary) compared with bigger more delicate leaves (basil, sage, parsley, sorrel). Herbs like mint and basil that oxidize quickly may pose special problems, but I've found mint to be the hardest. 

 

I wish I had a bunch of interns to test multiple versions with controlled variables. I

 

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1 hour ago, paulraphael said:

 

I've had great luck with thyme, and also done pretty well with basil (although I haven't tried the latter in years. The basil I've been growing tastes terrible). 

 

My current thinking is that different methods work well for herbs with small sturdy leaves (thyme varieties, lavender, rosemary) compared with bigger more delicate leaves (basil, sage, parsley, sorrel). Herbs like mint and basil that oxidize quickly may pose special problems, but I've found mint to be the hardest. 

 

I wish I had a bunch of interns to test multiple versions with controlled variables. I

 

 

I certainly wasn't questioning your ability to make herb ice cream.

 

Just saying that herb ice cream, in and of itself, is really not the reason to eat ice cream. At least not my reason. Gimme vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, peach, mint CHOCOLATE CHIP,  rum raisin, etc.

I'll be using the thyme and rosemary to roast my chicken!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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57 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

I certainly wasn't questioning your ability to make herb ice cream.

 

Just saying that herb ice cream, in and of itself, is really not the reason to eat ice cream. At least not my reason. Gimme vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, peach, mint CHOCOLATE CHIP,  rum raisin, etc.

I'll be using the thyme and rosemary to roast my chicken!

 

Herb flavors are special to me because of a single formative experience. I'd just finished working for a couple of years managing a homemade ice cream shop in Colorado ... a typical local shop that buys a base from a dairy and adds flavors. We thought it was great ice cream. Oreo and chocolate chip cookie dough and "rocky mountain road" ... that kind of thing. I then took a trip to Paris and got invited to dinner at Taillevent. This was way back when it was considered one of the great restaurants. One of the desserts (by pastry chef Gilles Bajolle ... I've been cyberstalking him since) was a single quenelle of thyme ice cream. It blew my head off. It made me realize I'd never even tasted good ice cream, much less made it. Since then, herbs have been a kind of obsession.

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5 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

My current thinking is that different methods work well for herbs with small sturdy leaves (thyme varieties, lavender, rosemary) compared with bigger more delicate leaves (basil, sage, parsley, sorrel). Herbs like mint and basil that oxidize quickly may pose special problems, but I've found mint to be the hardest. 

 

 

 

 

I'd be interested in your thoughts about best methods for using lavender.

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59 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Make soap.

 

I love lavender but this made me laugh, there is a very fine line for sure. When it's right, to my taste at least, I like it to be more of a "Mmm is that lavender?" vs "There is lavender in that", if that makes any sense. My family though is right there with you and the soap 🧼

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I like commercial mint ice cream, too, but I think of it as a particular mint flavor—mouth wash or candy canes. I like candy canes! But they don't taste like mint from the garden. And candy cane flavor is really easy to get—just throw in some mint extract or mint oil. 

 

My project over the last few years has been capturing all the dimensions of a flavor ingredient. I want to get all those bright and fresh garden mint flavors, just like I want to get all the nuances of single-origin coffees and chocolates. We're used to ice cream that has a generic coffee ice cream flavor, or a generic chocolate ice cream flavor, or a generic mint extract flavor. 

 

 

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Re: lavender—I haven't tried it yet. We've got a lavender plant, so I've been meaning to. I think it will be a tricky one to get right, because of the soap issue. You can't use too much. Cardamom is similar, but I've got a pretty high threshold for cardamom flavor, and that's really easy to get into ice cream. Lavender might be kind of delicate, in addition to being easy to overdo.

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On 9/15/2020 at 12:19 PM, beauxeault said:

 

I'd be interested in your thoughts about best methods for using lavender.

 

I think there are recipes online for Salt and Straw's Honey Lavender ice cream.  It's amazing to me how many of their odd ball flavors actually work. It's pretty good.

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I haven't gotten around to fussing with mint flavor in ice cream yet, but from my extraction experience I can suggest a couple of avenues for the home scientist to pursue in quest of something other than straight high-test mint oil.

 

A simple method would be to layer fresh mint leaves with your powdered sugar in a sealed environment and heat gently to express the volatile terpenes to permeate the sugar. This will be a subtle essence and might not correspond to what is normally considered mint flavor. Herbal, florals and menthol flavors might predominate. 

 

For those who really like to play hard, make up an ice bath with dry ice and alcohol and chill some Everclear 190, to which you would add your mint leaves. Stir for a minute or two, then strain and evaporate the leachate until an appropriate strength. This method will pull more oil and leave a stronger mint flavor, which you can vary with the length of wash. This will be a clear solution, if green is your goal do room temp, but you'll lose complexity.

Of course, wear gloves and eye protection.

 

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2 hours ago, rascali said:

For those who really like to play hard, make up an ice bath with dry ice and alcohol and chill some Everclear 190, to which you would add your mint leaves. Stir for a minute or two, then strain and evaporate the leachate until an appropriate strength. This method will pull more oil and leave a stronger mint flavor, which you can vary with the length of wash. This will be a clear solution, if green is your goal do room temp, but you'll lose complexity.

Of course, wear gloves and eye protection.

 

 

Dave Arnold has cracked the nut of mint flavor in cocktails, also with cryogenics—in his version, liquid nitrogen and a vita-prep. I haven't found a way to translate this into ice cream, even if I had LN2. 

 

I'm curious about your thinking with the cryo-alchohol. Have you done this?

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