Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Darienne

Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, sweettreateater said:

The information in underbelly is great!

 

I particularly liked the 'Discussion' section in Basic Ice Cream Examples, where you showed how a change in the recipe can result in unexpected deficiencies, but then how to counter that effect by changing other parts of the formulation. It really demonstrates the crucial balancing act that ice cream-making is! And it really helps make clear what each part of the formulation does.

 

One thing that I would personally really like to see is an entire posting on Solids: how to calculate them from your ingredient list, how to add them in when needed, how to counter them when they come in too high. I find the whole Solids component the trickiest part to understand well. It was covered in How To Build a Recipe but I wouldn't mind seeing more, especially how to manipulate the percentage.

 

For instance, how would you get enough solids if you were making a watermelon ice cream? You need a ton of watermelon juice to get enough flavor (because it's a relatively non-intense juice next to say, lemon), but then how do you maintain a high enough solid percentage without diluting the flavor?

 

 

Good idea about a post on solids. I planned to make half of the post on sugars about solids, but it ended up seeming like too much information. So yeah, maybe solids gets its own section.

 

The calculator Jo links to is good. I’d love to include excel or google docs spreadheets on the blog, but I don’t know how to program them. And the thought of trying to learn pretty much defrosts my freezer.

 

If anyone’s a spreadsheet whiz who has tips or is interested in taking on the project, please let me know.

 

There’s also a subscription-only calculator at dairyscience.info, and also a bunch of purchasable spreadsheets (they do consultancy for commercial ice cream production)—I’d like to make something with that kind of functionality, tailored to artisanal ice cream, and make it freely available.

 

Right now I mostly just muddle through the math. Which is a bit annoying, because almost every ingredient that you change will change more than one of the variables. For example, if you decrease the milk, you’re decreasing milk fat, milk solids nonfat, and total solids, but you’re lowering the total volume of the recipe, so the relative values of these ingredients might actually increase. 

 

Since I’m basically using grade school math, this process sends me around in circles a couple of times until the values work out

 

 

Re: watermeon ice cream. That’s a great example, and one I haven’t tried. My first thought would be to make a sorbet … which doesn’t solve all the problems, but definitely helps get the most out of the delicate flavor. For ice cream, I’d make an eggless base, no more than 12% fat, use additional stabilizing and emulsifying ingredients, and add a lot of milk powder to get the solids up (think of this as turning the water portion of the melon juice into skim milk). 

 

Then I’d experiment with ways to get the watermelon flavor intense enough. I’d play with mixing a portion of straight watermelon juice with some reduced watermelon juice. And I’d almost definitely add some acid, like lemon, which brings out a lot in that flavor.

 

Then you have to account for the sugars. I’ll get into this more when I post about fruit flavors. I have a table of typical sugar makeup of fruits. 

 

Watermelon is typically 9% total sugars, 1.6% glucose, 3.3% fructose, 3.6% sucrose. So you can figure out the total number of these sugars your adding, and subtract from the various sugars to compensate (notice that watermelon contains the exact sugars I use in the base recipe). 

 

Most of that is just arithmetic; the more interesting problem becomes getting a vibrant, 3-dimensional watermelon flavor. I think it will take some experimenting, but I’m pretty sure you won’t get it with a very rich, custard-based ice cream.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting Sugar post on underbelly.

 

I have quite the sweet tooth so I never think ice cream is too sweet. I only know it's too sweet when it won't stay frozen in my -10 freezer! ;) That's actually happening right now with a coffee ice cream I just made. Even I think it's too sweet. Just kidding.

 

I've been using corn syrup for quite a while but have been curious to try a different kind of invert sugar. I found a smaller sized example (22 oz) of Trimoline for $7.25 at lepicerie.

 

Would you say that the DIY formula for invert syrup on your site is equivalent to a commercial product like the one just mentioned? Is there any difference with the homemade one?

 

Really enjoying the underbelly blog. You do a great job of summarizing and explaining concepts, especially the "trade-offs" with formulation changes. A lot of other blogs and books offer a lot more detail but with less clarity.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks sweettreat. Good question about the commercial Trimoline. I'll guess that it has a higher percentage of inverted sugar, and so its differences from table sugar will be a bit more pronounced. When you make it yourself, you can get about 85% invert syrup ... the rest is just sucrose syrup. Manufacturers probably have a few more tricks (like chemical or enzymatic catalysts) that let them invert more. The other possible variation is the water percentage. I'm not sure what's in the commercial product. The DIY version has whatever water level you want. The hotter you cook it, the drier it will be. I cook to 235–237°F, which gives a bit under 20% water. This is dry enough so that it doesn't add too much water to the ice cream, and so that it has a long life in the fridge, but not so dry that it's completely annoying to work with.

 

Edited to add: please feel free to ask questions like this in the comment section on the blog, also. It will help me clarify this stuff for everyone.


Edited by paulraphael (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2016 at 8:13 AM, paulraphael said:

Re: watermeon ice cream. That’s a great example, and one I haven’t tried. My first thought would be to make a sorbet … which doesn’t solve all the problems, but definitely helps get the most out of the delicate flavor. For ice cream, I’d make an eggless base, no more than 12% fat, use additional stabilizing and emulsifying ingredients, and add a lot of milk powder to get the solids up (think of this as turning the water portion of the melon juice into skim milk). 

 

Then I’d experiment with ways to get the watermelon flavor intense enough. I’d play with mixing a portion of straight watermelon juice with some reduced watermelon juice. And I’d almost definitely add some acid, like lemon, which brings out a lot in that flavor.

 

Then you have to account for the sugars. I’ll get into this more when I post about fruit flavors. I have a table of typical sugar makeup of fruits. 

 

Watermelon is typically 9% total sugars, 1.6% glucose, 3.3% fructose, 3.6% sucrose. So you can figure out the total number of these sugars your adding, and subtract from the various sugars to compensate (notice that watermelon contains the exact sugars I use in the base recipe). 

 

Most of that is just arithmetic; the more interesting problem becomes getting a vibrant, 3-dimensional watermelon flavor. I think it will take some experimenting, but I’m pretty sure you won’t get it with a very rich, custard-based ice cream.

 

I also think a sorbet would be better. It seems like the problem could be in ensuring sufficient solids. Besides sugar, what could you add to increase the solid percentage?

 

With lemon sorbets, the flavor is so sour that you have to add a lot of sugar and I guess that takes care of the solids but that much sugar might overwhelm the watermelon...

 

I usually strain when I make sorbets but maybe if I didn't, that might increase the solids enough without hopefully detracting too much from the final smoothness.

 

I like the idea of reducing some of the watermelon juice.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pastry chefs often add milk powder to citrus sorbets. You could say this technically makes it not a sorbet, but it stays sorbet-like. I think industrial makers add things like maltodextrin. It's a sugar with a high molecular weight that adds practically no sweetness ... it's more like a starch. It also has very little effect on freezing point. I haven't played with this because I'm sure there are better ways to get solids. I'd go with powdered milk first.

 

Also, I said "watermelon juice" above but should have said watermelon puree. I suspect this would get some added flavor and color in addition to some solids.

 

If you experiment with reducing some of the watermelon let us know how it goes. I'd like to know what that does to the flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mgaretz   

Being lactose intolerant, I would hate to order a sorbet and discover hours later as I am in gastric distress that milk powder was added to it.

 

That being said, polydextrose could also be used to add solids without sweetness. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mgaretz said:

Being lactose intolerant, I would hate to order a sorbet and discover hours later as I am in gastric distress that milk powder was added to it.

 

That being said, polydextrose could also be used to add solids without sweetness. 

 

I think a restaurant would have to put a notice on the menu. Vegetarians also want to know if there's gelatin in the sorbet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/20/2016 at 7:37 AM, paulraphael said:

If you experiment with reducing some of the watermelon let us know how it goes. I'd like to know what that does to the flavor.

 

I made a watermelon sorbet and reduced some of the puree.

 

Since I wasn't sure how the reduction would alter the flavor, I reduced only half the puree, and I reduced that part 20% by weight. So the entire amount of puree was reduced by 10%. After reduction, the smell was a little odd and non-fruit like, though the taste was different than the smell and was OK. It's hard to say if reducing affected the flavor but it didn't ruin it either.

 

Overall, the finished product was quite good, taste-wise. The watermelon flavor came through pretty strong. It was a little on the too- sweet side, though. I felt that there were some defects too: it froze a little too cold and ended up too hard right out of the freezer, and the texture was a little crumbly. Once it warmed up, the texture was good and the crumbliness went away.

 

Anyone have any ideas what would cause a crumbly texture in a sorbet? Since the sugar level was comparable to other sorbets I've had success with (particularly strawberry), my guess is the watermelon sorbet was lacking solids. I also used corn syrup as the invert.

 

I opted not to strain it, hoping to retain some extra solids but maybe that is not enough. I am definitely thinking about trying either some nonfat milk solids, or get some stabilizers to try. I wanted to try it with as few extra ingredients as possible but I think a thin juice like watermelon might need a little help. I might get some dextrose as well, to add some FP suppression without adding sweetness.

 

Here was the formulation I tried:

 

(start) 30 oz fresh watermelon puree, unstrained
(final) 27 oz watermelon, after reducing half of it by 20%
8.25 ounces sugar
4.70 ounces of corn syrup
1 tsp lemon juice
1/16 tsp pinch of salt

 

Edit: I checked and my strawberry sorbet actually has more sugar in it (37% of total weight vs 30% of total weight). That could partly explain the difference in hardness.

 


Edited by sweettreateater (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my current template for sorbets. I believe there's room for improvement; after some more experimenting this summer I'll do a sorbet post. 

No matter what, all fruits are different, and so this can't be anything more than a general suggestion (this will be pretty close for berries, way off for lemon).

 

I'm glad you did that experiment with reducing some of the watermelon. It sounds like it didn't hurt. I'd be curious to know if it made much positive difference.

 

Crumbly textures are always the challenge with sorbet. You get them because there's just so much water, and therefore so much ice. There's no milk fat making things creamy, and there are usually far lower solids levels displacing and controlling the water. I have yet to make sorbet that's as creamy as ice cream, but it's definite goal. 

 

 

 

For approx. 1000g final product:

 

-70% (700g) puree (after hulling, pitting, straining, etc.) you may need up to 33% more than this in whole fruit.

 

-Total sugar, including sugar from fruit (measure or use chart) should be 18%

    Sugar composition should be:

    -0-30% sucrose

    -40-70% dextrose (reduce or eliminate if using alcohol)

    -20-30% trimoline

    (I’ve been using more and more dextrose, since it’s least sweet and suppresses freezing the most)

 

-Water for syrup:

    -30% minus weight of added sugars 

 

-Stabilizers:

    -0.2 to 0.3% of sorbet stabilizer blend:

    4 :  2 : 1 : 1

    LBG - guar - lambda carrageenan - kappa carrageenan

    for 1000g: 1.5g LBG, 0.75g guar, 0.38g lambda carrageenan, 0.38g kappa carrageenan

 

-0.07–0.1% salt

 

-In citrus flavors, up to 3% / 30g nonfat dry milk

 

-In herbal flavors, up to 0.7% / 7g herbs

 

-up to 1% / 10g lemon or lime juice to balance acidity (optional; taste puree)

 

-1% / 10g fruit brandy optional in fruit flavors

or for alcohol-centric flavors:

-up to 7% 80-proof booze (no more than 3% pure alcohol)

 (reduce water to equal amount)

 

-total solids should be 33%

    -fruit solids: see chart

    -sucrose / glucose solids: 97%

    -trimoline solids: 82%

    -glucose syrup solids: 63%

 

**********

 

 

-disolve all solid ingredients into water (pre mix stabilizers into sugar).

-bring to a simmer and remove from heat

-if using herbs, cover and let cool at room temp for 30 minutes

-chill at least 4 hours

-blend to break gel into fluid gel

-strain any herbs from syrup

 

-puree and strain fruit / add any citrus juice / alcohol. chill.

 

-mix syrup and puree; spin in ice cream machine

-draw at -5°C / 23°F

-harden in freezer

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting your sorbet formulations - super helpful!

 

18% sugar by weight seems fairly low - does that correspond to a Brix reading of 18 as well?

 

Also, I've mostly made sorbets without using a simple syrup, to try to avoid diluting the fruit flavor intensity. Is there any advantage to using the simple syrup vs just dissolving the sugar right in the puree overnight? Now that I think of it, I'm guessing you would kind of need to do it if you are using stabilizers...

 

Started the base for Bing cherry sorbet today - the Bings are really good this year. According to Migoya, cherries are 19% solids, so I was planning to not strain the puree to try take advantage of the "free solids". But as I was pureeing the last half, I heard the distinct sound of a pit being chewed up so I ended up having to strain about half the the puree to avoid getting bits of the stone in the final product. But hopefully there is still enough solids in there.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cwfenn   
On 6/20/2016 at 10:37 AM, paulraphael said:

 I think industrial makers add things like maltodextrin. It's a sugar with a high molecular weight that adds practically no sweetness ... it's more like a starch. It also has very little effect on freezing point. I haven't played with this because I'm sure there are better ways to get solids. I'd go with powdered milk first.

 

Is this the same thing as tapioca maltodextrin?  Or are there other types of maltodextrin? 


Edited by cwfenn (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are other types of maltodextrin. The tapioca version is usually used for solidifying fats (like in instant cake recipes, or experimental dishes). The other kind I've seen comes from brown rice or corn. I don't know the functional differences; I've just heard about it being used to boost solids in industrial ice cream.

 

Edited to add: I just looked around and it doesn't seem like there are any functional differences.

 

Edited again to add: There ARE functional differences. You might have to talk to reps at the manufacturers to sort them out. Here's a bit of info.


Edited by paulraphael (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a lot of years' trying, I think I've finally made a good chocolate ice cream. This is by far the hardest standard flavor, and one that's usually just ok—if you're looking for both intense chocolate flavor and good texture. 

 

The basic principles for were

-very good chocolate (I used Michel Cluizel Vila Gracinda single origin, 67%)

-very good cocoa powder, to increase the chocolate content without excessive amounts of cocoa butter (I used Michel Cluizel dutch process)

-low milk fat, to compensate for the added fat from chocolate (I went to 10% milk fat)

-no eggs. no need for yet another fat source

-all added sugar in the form of trimoline and dextrose. These sugars soften the ice cream, fighting the cocoa butter's hardening effects.

-lecithin as an emulsifier, since there are no eggs

-a stabilizer blend that's tweaked to get the texture right.

 

The results are pretty insane. My only complaint is that it's a bit like pudding when it melts in your mouth, but I'm not sure what to do about that. It IS pudding.

 

Formula for about 1L:

 

460g (1 cup 7 oz) whole milk
45g trimoline

 

50g  cocoa powder (best quality)

65g dextrose powder 

3g soy lecithin
1.2g salt
1.2g locust bean gum
0.6g guar gum
0.6g lambda carrageenan

 

130g (4.7 oz) bittersweet chocolate (best quality, 67–72% cocoa solids, chopped or in pastilles / chips)
240g (1 cup) heavy cream
10g vanilla extract (optional)

 

(Add trimoline to milk. stir together powdered ingredients. add to milk in blender, blending on highest speed for a minute. add chocolate. blend on high for 2 minutes to emulsify. briefly blend in cream and extract. cook to 80°C. homogenize for one minute in blender. chill. It's going to be very firm after aging. Zapping with the whisk attachment of a stick blender will thin it enough to spin in the ice cream machine) 

 

I'll do a more thorough post on chocolate on the underbelly blog. Maybe after a couple of minor tweaks.


Edited by paulraphael (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mgaretz   

According to many sources, and confirmed by my own experiments, to get really intense chocolate flavor you add some espresso powder.  Given your quantities I'd go with 5 gr and see how like it.


Edited by mgaretz (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mgaretz said:

According to many sources, and confirmed by my own experiments, to get really intense chocolate flavor you add some espresso powder.  Given your quantities I'd go with 5 gr and see how like it.

 

 

I'd think that would be an interesting hack to compensate for less-than-stellar chocolate. I really don't want to add something like espresso powder to the good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Luke   

Every now and again, you land upon a kitchen gadget of awesomeness that is beyond nirvana. OK maybe not that far, but pretty darn close.

 

Let me first say good pistachio paste is neither available or cost effective in my area. I tried every way possible way using my blender to make decent, smooth paste, without success.

 

Fellow eGulleter "Gap" (also a local for me) suggested I fork out and invest in a Premier Wonder Grinder, and Indian style Wet Grinder. I have no connection to this company, other than a happy user. There are other makes/models which all (probably) do a similar job.

 

Here is the result of pistachios vs grinder:

https://youtu.be/n5vvRC-N3nU

 

What you see is pure pistachio and a tiny bit of coconut oil (ie: 1 tsp to get it started). Absolutely incredible...silky smooth.

 

And apart from the pistachio paste, I have already found it makes the best pesto, amoungst several other things...

 

Time to dig out those pistachio recipes for some back to back taste tests...

 

Cheers

Luke

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried making pistachio paste with a vitamix or similar blender? I make nut butters all the time in mine, and contrary to what I was told, get results that are as smooth as anything from the store. Results depend somewhat on the oil content of the nuts. Almonds (which are similar to pistachios) need a little added oil to blend smooth. But pecans and walnuts have more than enough on their own. 

 

I wouldn't want to do this all day ... these blenders are irritatingly loud, and a bit of a pain to scrape out. I got a silicone spatula that's the right size for contours of the jug, and I use earplugs. For once a week or so it's pretty painless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rob1234   
2 hours ago, Luke said:

Fellow eGulleter "Gap" (also a local for me) suggested I fork out and invest in a Premier Wonder Grinder, and Indian style Wet Grinder. I have no connection to this company, other than a happy user. There are other makes/models which all (probably) do a similar job.

 

I can verify that the wonder grinder makes perfectly smooth pistachio butter. I bought one for the same reason, although an upgraded one http://indichocolate.com/products/chocolate-refiner made to run for longer periods.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gap   
13 hours ago, Luke said:

Every now and again, you land upon a kitchen gadget of awesomeness that is beyond nirvana. OK maybe not that far, but pretty darn close.

 

Let me first say good pistachio paste is neither available or cost effective in my area. I tried every way possible way using my blender to make decent, smooth paste, without success.

 

Fellow eGulleter "Gap" (also a local for me) suggested I fork out and invest in a Premier Wonder Grinder, and Indian style Wet Grinder. I have no connection to this company, other than a happy user. There are other makes/models which all (probably) do a similar job.

 

Here is the result of pistachios vs grinder:

https://youtu.be/n5vvRC-N3nU

 

What you see is pure pistachio and a tiny bit of coconut oil (ie: 1 tsp to get it started). Absolutely incredible...silky smooth.

 

And apart from the pistachio paste, I have already found it makes the best pesto, amoungst several other things...

 

Time to dig out those pistachio recipes for some back to back taste tests...

 

Cheers

Luke

 

Luke - glad to hear that it worked out for you 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deryn   

I rarely make ice cream and to be honest I can't even recall the last batch I made, its recipe or the flavour it was. However, I have a Breville Smart Scoop machine and an elderly friend who told me the other day that her favorite ice cream is Orange Pineapple. I asked if she meant sorbet or sherbet and she said no .. ice cream. I, like the sometimes generous fool that I am, said .. oh I will make you some of that (soon).

 

I checked out recipes online and for that particular flavour they are all over the map - custard base, whipped cream base (uncooked), sweetened condensed milk base, fresh pineapple, canned pineapple, orange concentrate, fresh OJ, even Orange Crush .. on and on .. no consistency.

 

I don't want to waste days (and a lot of ingredients) trying to experiment too much with this but a promise made with me is usually a promise kept so I want to at least start with a good idea of what might be the best way to get those flavours combined in the simplest manner to produce a tasty rich and creamy (identifiably) Orange Pineapple ice cream.

 

Another issue is that while this machine is a good one (for home use anyway) the container is rather small and one shouldn't add more than 3 cups of liquid total ... and most of the recipes were for amounts much larger (but not a nice multiple) than that. Some I thought I could reduce in scale and cutting in half went ok till I got down the list of ingredients and then I would encounter things like having to decide if I stay with 2 egg yolks (which was for the larger recipe) or cut an egg yolk in half to get 1 1/2 or 1 3/4's of an egg yolk for a reduced volume.

 

I am not a big ice cream fan myself and Orange Pineapple doesn't especially tick all my boxes so I would prefer to be able to make only 1 batch and not have leftover base to have to dispose of in some manner. Serves me right for opening my big mouth .. but I need some help here, friends ... hoping someone may help me find a simple recipe (or basic technique) that might work and turn out rich and creamy - and have some depth/balance of Orange Pineapple flavours.


Edited by Deryn (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Smithy   

I can't help with the recipe, but I will recommend that you make enough custard base that you don't have to try dolloping out fractions of egg yolks.  I think I froze my leftover base for a later ice cream. If you don't want it, maybe you could make another batch for this elderly friend, or use said base in another dessert altogether. I know you've indicated that you'd rather not do that, but can't the base be used in some baked goods that you do?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deryn   
1 hour ago, Smithy said:

I can't help with the recipe, but I will recommend that you make enough custard base that you don't have to try dolloping out fractions of egg yolks.  I think I froze my leftover base for a later ice cream. If you don't want it, maybe you could make another batch for this elderly friend, or use said base in another dessert altogether. I know you've indicated that you'd rather not do that, but can't the base be used in some baked goods that you do?

 

Thanks, Smithy. Hadn't thought (doh .. not sure why not) of conceptually/physically separating the 'base' from the 'added flavourings', probably since I kept looking at recipes just for Orange Pineapple (or Pineapple to which I figured I could add Orange or Orange to which I figured I could add Pineapple) and was taking them as the whole recipe that perhaps had to be done just as prescribed to succeed. Your idea however should work if I go with a custard base (though if I freeze that isn't it essentially 'ice cream' anyway?). Then I guess all I have to do is figure out how to put together the fruit element to add to it and churn it up.

 

Frankly making ice cream here with the temperatures rarely even hitting 70 degrees (and when they do there is invariably one of our famous winds to cool it down on the 'feels like' scale) just hasn't been a priority for me this summer. But, I know some people like ice cream regardless of the weather (or maybe they are pretending we are actually having a summer .. who knows).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Smithy   
1 minute ago, Deryn said:

<snip>

Frankly making ice cream here with the temperatures rarely even hitting 70 degrees (and when they do there is invariably one of our famous winds to cool it down on the 'feels like' scale) just hasn't been a priority for me this summer. But, I know some people like ice cream regardless of the weather (or maybe they are pretending we are actually having a summer .. who knows).

 

I certainly understand that!  It's been mostly cool and wet here too.  I haven't been inclined to bring my ice cream maker out of storage yet, although the beautiful stone fruits - and plenty of rhubarb in the stores - are making me think it's time regardless of the temperature.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Plum tart with almonds
       
      Starting from the first half of August, in the shops and on stands appear the first domestic plums. In September there are so many of them that I have a problem deciding which kind I should choose. Small and big, round and more ovate, violet, red and yellow. You can eat them fresh or make a lot of preserves (jams, plum stew, stewed fruits, pickles, liqueurs, plum brandy). Our favorite are big and round greengage plums, or slightly firm violet plums.
       
      Plums have a lot of valuable attributes. They regulate digestion and protect us from free radicals. Dried plums are more valuable regarding vitamin and fiber content, but they have five times more calories than fresh fruits.
       
      Plums have quite a lot B vitamins, so for a long time they have been well regarded for having a soothing effect on the nervous system and improving our frame of mind. That's why you simply have to make a plum cake. Either now or when the dreary autumn days arrive. Their benign impact on the nerves could be a good excuse for putting another piece of cake on your plate.
       
      I don't like complicated cookery. In this recipe you will find a lot of ingredients, but even so, preparing this delicious cake is very simple.
       
      Ingredients:
      Dough:
      250g of flour
      half a teaspoon of baking powder
      8g of vanilla sugar
      3 tablespoons of sugar
      150ml of 18% cream
      150g of butter
      Filling:
      600g of plums
      1 egg white
      3 tablespoons of minced almonds
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      200g of plum stew
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      Crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      3-4 tablespoons of flour
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      8g of vanilla sugar
      1 egg yolk
      Mix together the dry ingredients for the dough: flour, baking powder, sugar and vanilla sugar. Add cream. Mince the butter and add it to the dry ingredients. Quickly knead into smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
       
      Heat the oven up to 200C. Cover a baking pan (e.g. for a tart) with the dough, leaving the edges slightly raised around the sides. Whisk the egg white and cover the dough with it. Sprinkle with the almonds and brown sugar. Bake for 14 minutes. Take it out of the oven. Don't turn off the oven.
       
      Make the crumble topping when the dough is in the oven. Melt the butter, cool it a bit then add the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and egg yolk. Mix it with a fork until you have lumps.
       
      Clean the plums, cut them into halves and remove the stones. Cover the baked base with plum stew, add the plums and sprinkle with cinnamon and the crumble topping. Bake for 20 minutes.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pineapple and coconut – the ideal couple
       
      Today, inspired by the recipes from the book "Zielone koktajle. 365 przepisów" ("Green cocktails. 365 recipes") I prepared a light coconut-pineapple dessert. You may make it without sugar if you have enough sweet fruit. If your pineapple isn't very ripe, add a bit of honey to your dessert.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      fruit mousse
      1 pineapple
      300ml of coconut milk
      1 banana
      150ml of orange juice
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      decoration
      50g of butter
      1 tablespoon of caster sugar
      4 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      4 slices of orange
      fruit

      Blend all the ingredients of the fruit mousse. Put it into some glasses and leave in the fridge. Put the desiccated coconut, sugar and butter into a pan. Fry constantly, stirring on a low heat until the butter is melted. Leave to cool down a bit. Put 2-3 tablespoons of it on top of the desserts. Decorate with a slice of orange, fruit and some peppermint leaves before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Smile of the summer – apricot-peach shortcake
       
      Fortunately, the summer is not only about the weather. There is also fresh, sweet-smelling fruit. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for an easy to make weekend cake. It is excellent for afternoon tea or coffee. A little work and a little baking and after that you may serve and eat, and serve and eat again and again ... I remind you that it should be a weekend cake, so if you eat everything at once, you will need to bake another one 

      Ingredients:
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      75g of sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      1 teaspoon of baking powder

      fruit:
      1kg of apricot
      4 peaches
      2 packets of powdered vanilla blancmange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the flour, sugar, baking powder and butter onto a baking board. Chop it all up with a knife. When you have the consistency of crumble topping, add the egg and egg yolk and then knead the dough quickly. Divide the dough into two parts – 2/3 and 1/3. Cover the pieces of dough with plastic wrap and put them into the freezer.
      Wash the apricots, remove the stones and cube them. Put them into a saucepan, add a bit of water and boil until they are soft. Stir the blancmange powder in 150ml of cold water and add it to the apricots. Boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. Turn off the heat. Wash the peaches, remove the stones and cube them. Add them to the apricots and mix them in.
      Heat the oven up to 180C.
      Smooth a 23-cm cake tin with some butter and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Grate the bigger part of the dough onto the cake tin, even it out and bake for 15-17 minutes. Take out the cake, but don't turn off the oven. Put the fruit mixture onto it and grate the rest of the dough onto the top. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
    • By Kasia
      White chocolate whip with aquafaba with crumble topping and fruit.
       
      Today I would like to share with you a dessert fit for a king. It needs a bit of work, but it is easy, and so tasty that you won't regret the time you spent on it. I have already made chocolate whip with aquafaba. Today I added a bit of whisked sweet cream, due to which it is more creamy but it isn't suitable for vegetarians.

      You may use any fruit. In my opinion, bilberries, blueberries or raspberries are best. Cherries would also be excellent, but you may use your favourite fruit.

      Ingredients:
      crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      50g of flour
      50g of sugar
      1 tablespoon of sesame seeds
       
      whip:
      200ml of aquafaba (from one tin of chickpeas)
      150g of white chocolate
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      30g of caster sugar
      other ingredients
      fruit
      caster sugar

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper.
      Make the crumble topping. Make a smooth dough with the ingredients. Make a ball with it, roll it out flat and put it on the baking paper. Bake for 10-15 minutes until it is golden. Cool it down and crumble it.
      Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and leave it to cool down a little. Whip the aquafaba and sweet cream with caster sugar in a separate bowl. Mix them together. Add the white chocolate and stir thoroughly but gently. Put the chocolate whip into some small bowls and leave in the fridge for 2 hours.
      Put the crumble topping onto the chocolate whip. Decorate with the fruit and peppermint leaves.

      Enjoy your meal!
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×