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Darienne

Home Made Ice Cream (2015– )

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On 4/18/2016 at 2:37 PM, gap said:

 

Migoya has posted about some errors and offered corrections. Not sure if it ties up directly with your issues above but here's the post:

https://www.scribd.com/doc/14454904/Frozen-Desserts-Corrections

 

 

Thanks, yes, I did previously find that update when I was searching around for an errata page. Unfortunately, it doesn't address any of the typos. I was hoping I could find an email address for him to ask him directly!

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On 4/19/2016 at 8:39 AM, paulraphael said:

 

I've found the Migoya book interesting, and one of the only non-food-science industry books that tries to get into the nitty gritty. But it seems unreliable on many details. I'm not sure I'm going to keep my copy. The erata link posted by Gap may clear up some issues. Aside from errors, I've found some of his formulas, like his basic stabilizer formulas, to be not very good. I used them as a point of departure, and ended up very from that point when I finally got things working well. 

 

Your two specific questions that I can answer: nonfat solids should generally be between 8 and 10%, and that does not include the sugars (except for the lactose in the milk). Non-lactose sugars are usually above 14%.

 

 

Thanks for the info!

 

So his recommendation for nonfat solids between 15% and 30% seems awfully high.

 

On the page 351 example above, he lists examples of what non-fat solids are, and he does include "sweeteners", maybe meaning sugar? So maybe that is how he gets to the 15%-30%? Though he does add sugar separately at the bottom. So maybe not...

 

Just so I understand, "all nonfat solids" means everything non-liquid (except the sugar)? So basically, there are three elements: liquids (and the fat in the liquids), nonfat solids, and sugar?

 

So if you have, let's say, 10 oz of 72% dark chocolate as an ingredient, which I think is about 42% fat, the chocolate would add 5.8 oz of nonfat solids? Or 10 oz of peaches at 85% water would add 1.5 ounces of nonfat solids? (not sure if the percentages are exactly right but just trying to get the concept...)

 

I've kind of given up on the book as well - with all the errors, I'm never sure if what I am reading is correct. My favorite typo was where it actually said, "Please see chart on page XXX". ;)

 

I'll probably keep it because I am sure the theory behind what he's explaining is correct, even if the published numbers are sometimes baffling.

 

 

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"On the page 351 example above, he lists examples of what non-fat solids are, and he does include "sweeteners", maybe meaning sugar? So maybe that is how he gets to the 15%-30%? Though he does add sugar separately at the bottom. So maybe not..."

 

If he IS including sugars—which would be completely reasonable, just not the way i've seen it done—then 20–30% would be totally reasonable. 

Whether or not you include the sugars in the solids is up to you. You just have to make sure you're speaking the same language as whoever you're swapping formulas with. 

 

I think you have the right idea with figuring out percentages. It can just be an annoying amount of math when you're dealing with fruit and nuts and chocolate. Chocolate makers sometimes don't tell you everything. And with fruit, if you want to precise, you want to figure out the ratio of the different kinds of sugars.
 

The chart on p. XXX cleared up all these issues for me. :D


Notes from the underbelly

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I've started work on a whole series of ice cream posts on the underbelly blog

 

Just the beginnings right now, but over the next few weeks I'd like to get into the nitty gritty of recipe design, including proportions of sugars and designing a stabilizer blend.

 

If you catch any mistakes or if anything's unclear, I welcome your feedback.

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Notes from the underbelly

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On 5/24/2016 at 7:24 PM, paulraphael said:
On 5/24/2016 at 7:24 PM, paulraphael said:

I've started work on a whole series of ice cream posts on the underbelly blog

 

Just the beginnings right now, but over the next few weeks I'd like to get into the nitty gritty of recipe design, including proportions of sugars and designing a stabilizer blend.

 

If you catch any mistakes or if anything's unclear, I welcome your feedback.

 

That's great!

 

Looking forward to another great ice cream resource!

 

 

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I liked the "Ice Cream Technique" post on the underbelly blog!

 

This was an interesting idea:

"Here’s a trick for if you’re using anything less powerful than a true homogenizer: Don’t add the cream to your recipe until after the cooking step. It’s the source of most of the milk fat, and if you don’t cook it, you won’t de-homogenize it."

 

But it also made me wonder: doing it this way, would you also lose the benefit (for the cream portion) of the protein denaturing, since it would not be heated? Or would the trade-off for not losing the homogenization be worth it?

 

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8 hours ago, sweettreateater said:

I liked the "Ice Cream Technique" post on the underbelly blog!

 

This was an interesting idea:

"Here’s a trick for if you’re using anything less powerful than a true homogenizer: Don’t add the cream to your recipe until after the cooking step. It’s the source of most of the milk fat, and if you don’t cook it, you won’t de-homogenize it."

 

But it also made me wonder: doing it this way, would you also lose the benefit (for the cream portion) of the protein denaturing, since it would not be heated? Or would the trade-off for not losing the homogenization be worth it?

 

 

That's a good question, and the answer is yes, you'd lose the benefit. But ... the benefits are very small, and the milk solids in the cream are a small portion of the total milk solids in a well designed recipe. For example, in a recipe that's half cream and half milk, if you add enough nonfat dry milk to get the milk solids up to 10%, then the milk solids in the cream are just 23% of what's in the recipe.

 

That said, I haven't tried it both ways and compared side-by-side. My guess is that the differences would be very small.


Notes from the underbelly

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

https://biospec.com/product/biohomogenizer

 

@sweettreateater you know you want one.  But @paulraphael has a point.  I sometimes used to add commercially homogenized cream at the end...before I didn't have to.  Besides, ice cream pasteurization is not important unless you like your friends and family.

 

Yes, Jo, we all envy your homogenizer!

 

Re: pasteurization ... for most non-industrial purposes we can just call it cooking. There are several reasons to cook the mix. When making ice cream at home pasteurization is not usually an important one (assuming you're starting with pasteurized milk and cream).


Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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21 minutes ago, sweettreateater said:

 

I do want one.

 

And the link also gave me some recipe ideas:

 

"Complete homogenization of soft tissue (muscle, liver, brain, etc.) is usually achieved in one minute or less."  ;)

 

Dan Aykroyd had that idea 40 years ago!


Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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6 hours ago, sweettreateater said:

 

I do want one.

 

And the link also gave me some recipe ideas:

 

"Complete homogenization of soft tissue (muscle, liver, brain, etc.) is usually achieved in one minute or less."  ;)

 

Not to be serious or anything, but wasn't one eGullet member recently wanting to make blood ice cream?

 

Plus Modernist Cuisine have promised usage of the homogenizer in their forthcoming treatise The Art and Science of Bread.  You will have something on which to spread your exceptionally smooth pate before you enjoy your frozen dessert.

 

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6 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

Dan Aykroyd had that idea 40 years ago!

 

 

He was a bit late.  Recently the NY Times brought attention to the traditional Bolivian beverage of blended raw frogs, carrots and honey.  Street vendors prepare the drink to order ala Aykroyd while you watch.  I remarked to a Bolivian friend that it might be tasty frozen.

 

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjakayZ8P3MAhWERSYKHXDoD1QQFggcMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2016%2F05%2F21%2Fworld%2Fwhat-in-the-world%2Ffor-this-green-smoothie-the-first-ingredient-is-frog.html&usg=AFQjCNEP_9pLRuKRpLjGzYhQZ7XyfGahCA&bvm=bv.123325700,d.eWE


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker Added link to article (log)
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Tonight I'm doing the experiment I mentioned earlier of combining and cooking the mix entirely in the Precise Heat Mixing Bowl.  If successful this will be a considerable saving of labor and mess of bringing the mix to temperature on the stovetop before transferring to the PHMB:

 

heavy cream 1000 g

large egg yolks 6

sugar (sucrose) 120 g

kosher salt pinch

vanilla paste 1 Tablespoon (very approximate)

 

 

The mix (less the vanilla paste which is added just before spinning) is in the PHMB at the moment, set to 198 deg F.  The KitchenAid KSM8990WH is on speed 2.  I expect the mix will take a while to come to 160 deg F.

 

After half an hour the mix has reached 143 deg F -- perhaps not as bad as I had thought.  From memory it takes about fifteen or twenty minutes stirring on the stove to reach 160 deg F.

 

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Well, time got away from me.  My excuse is the timer was in the other room and I was aimlessly perusing eGullet...

 

After an hour and five minutes the mix was at 162 deg F.  I have no idea when exactly the mix came up to temperature.  Judging evaporation by eye, I pulled the plug at an hour and fifteen minutes.  Nor any idea if really, really pasteurized but fortunately ice cream mix pasteurizes more rapidly in the US than in the UK, so I am probably OK.

 

I transferred the mix to the homogenization vessel, a 1/6 very deep hotel pan reserved for the purpose, and homogenized four minutes on high...the homogenizer, that is, on high.  Then placed the vessel in a prepared ice bath till chilled.  The chilled mix tasted really good and I am hopeful.  Covered, then refrigerated in the coldest spot of the refrigerator (which is in my kitchen).  Followed by a well deserved shower for the cook.

 

And then and only then, only slightly off topic, a well deserved zombie and today's delivery of nuts.com salted mixed nuts.

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Jo, I'm looking forward to your report on the KA heated bowl. I mention it as a possibility in my ice cream series, but you're doing the original research.

 

Also, please advise re: 'well deserved zombie' and all repercussions


Notes from the underbelly

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16 hours ago, paulraphael said:

Jo, I'm looking forward to your report on the KA heated bowl. I mention it as a possibility in my ice cream series, but you're doing the original research.

 

Also, please advise re: 'well deserved zombie' and all repercussions

 

I've been successfully using the PHMB for over a year now, as I recall.  What's new is that I'm starting the mix in it.  That is instead of making the custard on the stovetop and then finishing cooking in the PHMB, I added the cream, sugar, eggs (preferably shelled and separated) directly to the PHMB (that last bit about the eggs being a poor attempt at humor) and had at it.

 

I can report success.

 

After refrigerating for about twenty four hours I spun half the mix for fifteen minutes.  Draw temperature, for what it's worth, was -5.1 deg C.  I sampled some of the results soft-serve and it was better than usual.

 

I just finished a bowl after seven hours' hardening.  Almost perfect, although I'd prefer the ice cream slightly harder.  It probably will be so by tomorrow, barring thunderstorms.

 

Would that I had a blast freezer.

 

The thing is, this is so easy.  KitchenAid and Cuisinart do all the work.

 

And, oh, the zombie did what a zombie is supposed to do.

 

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As predicted, after a day the ice cream hardened.  Still quite scoopable.  Hard to imagine better, and so easy.  Unlike my munavalgekook.

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I love ice cream.  All kinds.  Really, I can't have it in the house or I eat it all.  Quickly.  Like a whole Ben and Jerry's by myself.  

 

I couldn't take it anymore.  I had to have ice cream, so I threw my bowl in the freezer and used Lebovitz's Perfect Scoop to find a recipe.  I wanted something simple so I made plain vanilla.  I shouldn't have done this because I am now going to make another batch....and then probably another.  I also made a wonderful hot fudge sauce for the top.  I have a lot of that left over so, dang it, I have to make more ice cream.  

 

I forgot to take a picture last night, so in the interest of documentation, I forced myself to have another bowl this morning.

 

photo.jpg

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41 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I forgot to take a picture last night, so in the interest of documentation, I forced myself to have another bowl this morning.

 

photo.jpg

 

 That's the spirit!  Take one for the team!  (then another, and another...) :laugh:

 

Incidentally, my first thought at the photo was jam instead of chocolate sauce.  If you like, oh, say, rhubarb or blackberry jam and have some available, you may find yourself needing to make more ice cream after this batch of hot fudge runs out.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

Really, I can't have it in the house or I eat it all.

 

Yeah, I'm equally in trouble with my girlfriend for making ice cream and for not making it.

 

One thing I find that helps with the whole addiction / binge thing is making it with intense flavors ... ones that really bloom in your mouth and evolve and slow you down. We find these ice creams satisfying in much smaller doses.

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Notes from the underbelly

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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

Like a whole Ben and Jerry's by myself.

 

For me, this is a single serving.

 

Two Ben and Jerry's falls into the "solidly indulgent, though not quite excessive" category. I have yet to broach the excessive threshold.

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WoW

 

@Shelby

 

lets review :

 

I have  ( in hiding ) a donvier hand cracked ice-cream maker.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Donvier-837409W-1-Quart-Cream-Maker/dp/B00006484E..  

 

but a lot older,  you put the container that you churn in a very cold freezer, then make your IceCream components and chill then

 

dump that into the don, churn by hand,  and ice cream

 

 Its down in the basement where it belongs

 

in the past I went to North of Cooperstown from time to time.

 

there was a dairy there that I could walk to.  ultra-fresh cream if not double Cream I might get there.  you could not even

 

hear the cows, but enjoy all about them.  I had to call in advance to secure the right about of cream  for the day's project

 

it sold out from day to day  way before the early  hours.

 

but i made Ultra- massively full cream  Ice cream back then

 

loved doing it

 

2 -3 small scoops of this stuff  ( all fresh or high end vanilla or chocolate items involved )

 

would demand a nap.

 

loved it all.

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51 minutes ago, rotuts said:

WoW

 

Full disclosure:

 

Two Ben & Jerry's at one sitting: OK, not really done on a regular basis. Maybe once, and with some regret. ;) 

 

One B&J at a time: easy, but once must sustain the semblance of self-control, especially if others are around. Once they leave, well..  ;)

 

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

As predicted, after a day the ice cream hardened.  Still quite scoopable.  Hard to imagine better, and so easy.  Unlike my munavalgekook.

Been doing custards the traditional way-How long did it take to get the custard to temperature in the PHMB?

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