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Chillin' in Manitoulin


Kerry Beal
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attachicon.gifIMG_1243.jpg

 

Corelle - unbreakable right?

That's what my Grammy always said.  I don't think she ever broke any of hers.  She gave me a set and I only have a bowl and a plate left.  Could have something to do with my clumsiness and a stone kitchen floor...........

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Oh, dear! That is an impressive number of shards. Given the size range, I can imagine Porthos' scenario. When you have a moment, please tell us how far and high it spread. A story as colorful as your language must have been would not be amiss.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Regarding the shards (not pieces), I have a dog and cat, so you can imagine my concerns. My breakage was due to putting a hot plate on a wet counter. I wonder if age affects its resilience.

 

p

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Was it dropped or suffer a temperature differential?

 

p

Dragged it off the counter with my clumsy elbow.

 

Checked far and wide for shards - not the first one I've broken. Had a whole shelf fall at home onto the tiles - broke a crap load of Corelle that day. And as usual standing in my bare feet in the middle of it!

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Dragged it off the counter with my clumsy elbow.

 

Checked far and wide for shards - not the first one I've broken. Had a whole shelf fall at home onto the tiles - broke a crap load of Corelle that day. And as usual standing in my bare feet in the middle of it!

Sounds like if you put us in a kitchen together, we'd be hell on dishes  :raz:

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Duck breast cooked in CSO - then fat side browned until nice and crispy. Sauced with a bit of saba, reduced duck stock and mounted with a bit of duck fat. Potatoes pressured cooked then into duck fat to finish. Corn done in nuke in it's husk with the ass end cut off so it can be simply squeezed out when it's done. 

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Corn was lovely - I had an excellent chat with the fellow I bought it from at the farmer's market. He said being the end of the season I could expect some ear worms. That led to a discussion of corn smut and how he had found a big batch of it the day before - I told him he should be selling it - he seemed a bit surprised. 

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I want to like rye - I really do - but damn it I don't!

I'm the same way about Islay scotch. Rye, I don't mind... but it definitely ranks below bourbon for me.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Corn was lovely - I had an excellent chat with the fellow I bought it from at the farmer's market. He said being the end of the season I could expect some ear worms. That led to a discussion of corn smut and how he had found a big batch of it the day before - I told him he should be selling it - he seemed a bit surprised. 

Oh yes,  huitlachoche.  I have two batches in the freezer to add to enchiladas this winter.  Good stuff.  Weird..I know, but super good.

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I want to like rye - I really do - but damn it I don't! So binned the Manhattan Transfer and mixed up a Brother's Perryman. 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1246.jpg

 

Wow, I am impressed by the way you are tempting the fates by setting that filled glass on the edge of your laptop keyboard AND near the edge of the table/tray. 

 

If that were me, my next photo would be picking up glass shards from the floor and using a paper towel to try and dry off my laptop keys.   :laugh:

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attachicon.gifIMG_1248.jpg

Duck breast cooked in CSO - then fat side browned until nice and crispy. Sauced with a bit of saba, reduced duck stock and mounted with a bit of duck fat. Potatoes pressured cooked then into duck fat to finish. Corn done in nuke in it's husk with the ass end cut off so it can be simply squeezed out when it's done.

I've tried that method of cooking corn a number of times, and decided that I'm missing the hand strength, the heat tolerance, or both to make it work satisfactorily. Mitts are too clumsy, towels too big and bare hands too tender for me. Got any tips on this?

Wow, I am impressed by the way you are tempting the fates by setting that filled glass on the edge of your laptop keyboard AND near the edge of the table/tray.

If that were me, my next photo would be picking up glass shards from the floor and using a paper towel to try and dry off my laptop keys. :laugh:

If it were me, I'd be out of commission until I found a replacement keyboard. I've already sacrificed one keyboard/docking station to the Salad Dressing Gods. :laugh:

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I've found that with the corn - you need to cut it above a certain spot to get it to squeeze out easily.  And I let it cool for a bit before I try.

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Yup. With the corn, you need to cut it just barely high enough that you take off a smidge of the lowest kernels. If you do that, it practically squirts out. If you cut it too low, you can squeeze till you make the corn into juice and nothing else happens.

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

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I'm probably cutting a little higher even - above the 'shoulder' so that you aren't trying to squeeze it though an opening smaller than the widest diameter of the corn. 

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Yup. With the corn, you need to cut it just barely high enough that you take off a smidge of the lowest kernels. If you do that, it practically squirts out. If you cut it too low, you can squeeze till you make the corn into juice and nothing else happens.

This is where I've been cutting, but I haven't gotten the "it practically squirts out" result. Maybe I'm not nuking the corn long enough, although it seems fully cooked. I end up squeezing like crazy, working the cob along its green shell until it comes out, and often giving up about halfway through and peeling the rest back. I confess to a bit of a mental block with regard to sweet corn, so that may be a factor. Looking back at Kerry's response, it's also possible I'm not letting it cool quite long enough before squeezing.

Kerry, that toast looks perfect.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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From Kerry's description, I believe she is squeezing it out through the cut end, I initially presumed it was the tassel end. Smithy it sounds like you're heading towards the tassel end as well.

 

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I've tried that method of cooking corn a number of times, and decided that I'm missing the hand strength, the heat tolerance, or both to make it work satisfactorily. Mitts are too clumsy, towels too big and bare hands too tender for me. Got any tips on this?

If it were me, I'd be out of commission until I found a replacement keyboard. I've already sacrificed one keyboard/docking station to the Salad Dressing Gods. :laugh:

Others have answered about cutting just above the bottom layer of kernels.  As far as heat goes, I use those dishwashing gloves to handle them.  You can get a good grip.  Also - I've found that you need to wiggle the ear back and forth a bit.  Kind of waving it in the air cut side down.  

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