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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 1)


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Sure. Both your statements are true but they really don't address the question of the quantity or quality of the steam created by the two different liquids. And the bare carrot versus foil-wrapped carrot is elementary. There is something else going on here which I am trying to get to the bottom of.

I'm going out on a limb here but again I come back to density, a thinner mixture (just plain water) will create more steam, quicker than a thicker mixture. When a substance changes from a liquid to a gas heat is given off and the heat comes from the liquid. It takes longer for a thicker liquid to recover that heat and continue to convert itself to vapor.

 

Perhaps someone with more than High School science could jump in with a more expert opinion.

 

p

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Anna I feel pretty certain that is superlative mac'n'cheese from that photo.

I thank you for your kindness. I shall try to move it along today to a house where it might be more appreciated and see if I get any feedback.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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Quick question on your Mac & Cheese recipe:

 

Is your "T" abbreviation teaspoon or Tablespoon?

 

I wonder if you could you use whole milk instead of evaporated?

 

Parmesan is the expensive one for sure.

 

p

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Quick question on your Mac & Cheese recipe:

 

Is your "T" abbreviation teaspoon or Tablespoon?

 

I wonder if you could you use whole milk instead of evaporated?

 

Parmesan is the expensive one for sure.

 

p

Yep. Standard recipe abbreviation. T = tablespoon; t = teaspoon. I am sure you could use whole milk but the point of the evaporated milk I believe is the creaminess it provides without making a true bechamel.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I don't know if anyone is old enough to have experienced it but there was a tradition in certain countries in certain villages of a communal oven. I know you are all aware of this. But who ever heard of a communal Instant Pot? Well I may have the first. In the next day or so I will be making yogurt for myself and pork belly and beets (not together!) for someone else.

First batch of beets cooking now. If energy levels allow, yogurt will be made overnight and tomorrow I will tackle the pork belly in the style of Momofuku.

Stay tuned or even better document your own experiences with this appliance!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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If one makes yogurt in the IP Im interested in finding the times it takes to 

 

1 ) get the milk to the 'denaturing' temp

 

2 ) the time it them takes to let the milk cool to get to the inoculating tenp

 

and how are you notified when 2 ) is to do the inoculating.

 

I made a lot of yogurt 'manually' doing each of these steps.

 

i made a crude heavy cardboard box with a heat source for the last phase, the culture's grown.

 

this might be a much simpler method.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I looked over commercial yogurts.  at the store.   I ended up with three brands that have overlapping strains ( so they claimed ) of live culture

 

so i had the maximum number of strains.

 

I stopped there and went to work.

 

now some strains are 'patented'   so you see where this might go

 

I wanted yogurt for the Humans and the Labradors .  1.99 for 4 quarts.  that's the price of the milk.

 

but there is a lot of ( possible ) hocus-pocus on what various strains might do for you health wise., esp. if they want your $$$.

 

the ive gotten starters from the company you mentioned. for Keffir.  they seemed on the level.

 

once you start, and as long as your cultures stay alive  your are set and use that ti inoculate the future cultures.

 

i was not that interested in health claims at that time, just volume.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I swear I will be joining soon.  Had plans to start today and life got in the way again.  I am very interested in the yogurt making.  I want to make some too.  Need to find out what to buy for that.....

Sheesh. Patience, Grasshopper! All you need is some milk and either live yogurt starter from the health food store or yogurt from the grocery store which contains live cultures. I use Astro Balkan Style yogurt which I know has live cultures and no gelatin for most of my Indian cooking so that is what I will use.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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If one makes yogurt in the IP Im interested in finding the times it takes to 

 

1 ) get the milk to the 'denaturing' temp

 

2 ) the time it them takes to let the milk cool to get to the inoculating tenp

 

and how are you notified when 2 ) is to do the inoculating.

 

I made a lot of yogurt 'manually' doing each of these steps.

 

i made a crude heavy cardboard box with a heat source for the last phase, the culture's grown.

 

this might be a much simpler method.

I will do my best to give you the documentation you are requesting. I will make a lab note in my special notebook to record those things you're asking me to record. But only if I can remember. The system looks so simple I absolutely have to try it.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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go for as many live strains as you can find, at the grocery.

 

its educational to read the labels in the stores.

 

one brand i used in my 3-yog concoction seems to have disappeared , as they vastly exaggerated the health claims of their strains.

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I plan to get there at some point my self.

 

after I stop waddling about.  I didn't see in the manual the cooling time from the end of 'denaturing' to 'inoculating'

 

and unless you do the 'individual' jar method, Im guessing you scoop the stuff out when its done and add it

 

to your containers for eating later.

 

making yogurt is fun, just remember to keep everything 'very clean' after the yogurt reaches the culture end point you are after

 

longer = more sour.

 

its a whole new world.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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go for as many live strains as you can find, at the grocery.

 

its educational to read the labels in the stores.

 

one brand i used in my 3-yog concoction seems to have disappeared , as they vastly exaggerated the health claims of their strains.

Not a connoisseur of yogurt so unlikely to spend much time or money on multiple brands. What I am hugely interested in is:

Will shelf-stable milk make decent yogourt? So it is claimed.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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AnnaN, always with interesting points.

 

what makes it shelf stable ?  irradiation ?

 

it if has milk proteins it will make yogurt.

 

does shelf stable milk taste like refrigerated ordinary milk from the store ? Ive never tired it.

 

it will taste like th milk you started with but tart and firmed up.

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AnnaN, always with interesting points.

 

what makes it shelf stable ?  irradiation ?

 

it if has milk proteins it will make yogurt.

 

does shelf stable milk taste like refrigerated ordinary milk from the store ? Ive never tired it.

 

it will taste like th milk you started with but tart and firmed up.

We, that is Kerry Beal and I buy organic shelf stable milk from Trader Joe's. It comes in 8 ounce tetra packs and means there is always milk here for Kerry's tea! I have never tasted it! But if it will make yogourt to be used when I want chicken tikka masala .......

It is ultra high temperature pasteurized to keep it shelf stable. It doesn't last forever. My current batch has a best before date of November 2, 2015.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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even more interesting.  maybe you can skip the first step is you use this stuff.

 

just keep every thing very clean.  buy any yogurt with live culture. add a fresh box to a very clean IP .

 

look on pp 16 of the IP manual and decided if there is a way to go directly to step 2 bypassing step 1 which is the 180 F step

 

your shelf-stable milk might have already had that done to it at the box-producers.

 

just a guess.

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Going to pull this away from Yogurt making for just a momento to say....Risotto came out delicious! I made duck breasts with it so I rendered the duck fat and used that to Saute the onion garlic and rice in the Instant Pot...I also added butter and a bit of bacon fat for good measure. Creamy...smooth, flavourful and EASY!

 

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[attach]ment=52847:11894438_10153026945127703_3882562789162369563_o.jpg]

11988212_10153026921027703_6312225338227268314_n.jpg

11894438_10153026945127703_3882562789162369563_o.jpg

Edited by Mmmpomps (log)
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Thanks for sharing, Mmmpomps. The duck breasts look especially delicious. I have never quite got the point of rissotto but understand that is my loss! Since many people rave about how good and easy it is in the pressure cooker, I may give it another chance.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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So I have been cooking beets for most of my adult life. I have boiled them on the stove top, I have pressure cooked them and I have roasted them. I have always found them to be all over the place in terms of the length of time they need to become tender.

Do not know why I thought the IP would change this.

I had a total of 12 beets each weighing between 135 and 180 g. I cooked the first four according to the recommendations on the hip pressure cooking site. It called for one cup of water, the steamer basket, four beets and a time of 25 minutes at high-pressure. They still offered some resistance to a paring knife after this amount of time so I gave them an additional five minutes.

One would think this timing would be useful for the second batch of four beets. One would be wrong! The second batch of beets required an extra 10 minutes so that we are now up to 40 minutes.

I cooked the final two beets for 40 minutes and made the following note in my lab book:

Beets are not asparagus! They are almost impossible to cook to mush. Give beets in this size range 45 minutes and be done with it. YMMV.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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even more interesting.  maybe you can skip the first step is you use this stuff.

 

just keep every thing very clean.  buy any yogurt with live culture. add a fresh box to a very clean IP .

 

look on pp 16 of the IP manual and decided if there is a way to go directly to step 2 bypassing step 1 which is the 180 F step

 

your shelf-stable milk might have already had that done to it at the box-producers.

 

just a guess.

Perhaps you could but for this first trial I am going to follow the "rules".

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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AnnaN, always with interesting points.

 

what makes it shelf stable ?  irradiation ?

 

it if has milk proteins it will make yogurt.

 

does shelf stable milk taste like refrigerated ordinary milk from the store ? Ive never tired it.

 

it will taste like th milk you started with but tart and firmed up.

It's very common in France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. In fact, when we were in Belgium for the spring, it was impossible to find skim milk that wasn't UHT, and all the UHT milk was far less expensive than the refrigerated milk. It has a slightly cooked flavor that I don't particularly care for if (for some reason) I want to drink a glass of milk, but it's fine for cooking, baking, and hot chocolate making. I kept some around because my shoebox-sized fridge didn't give me the luxury of always having a half-gallon container in the fridge.

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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So for those of you who are interested here's my lab notes and some photographs from the yogourt making session of yesterday.

Yogurt made from the shelf-stable milk (the jar with the string around it) was considerably less thick than that made from the milk out of the refrigerator. I also thought it was a little less tangy.

I found the process tedious last evening but then I was extremely tired and just wanted to close my eyes not hang around waiting for yogourt to drop in temperature! Now that I have the times that each step in the process takes I think I will find it much easier. The yogourt does firm up considerably after a time in the refrigerator.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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