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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 1)


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I took what turned out to be the majority of my 2.8 lbs of cubed beets and added them to a Ba-Tampte  " tasty " beet 'jus'

 

I ate all the 1/2 sour pickles but have always regreated tossing the 'jus'

 

here they are and back in the refirg.

 

Ba-Tampte.jpg

 

I have high expectations for this.  Ill give them an Topsy-Turvey from time to time to get the Bottom goodness

 

mixed around.

 

Ill try 7 min for the next batch if I chose to continue living in the DangerZone of dicing raw Beets.

 

I do not recommend cutting raw beets yourself.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Wow AnnaN

fantastic. of course I don't have a 1 pound coffee can. I love Boston Brown Bread.

being near BOS, Ive only had the real deal at a restaurant called Durgin Park a long time ago. Roast Beef, prime the real deal,

communal tables is you wanted to eat before you starved, and real indian pudding for desert.

I like to make that bread. however, my electric oven had yet to be repaired ( part at amazon : 14.95, local 'craftsman' to come to my home and fix it : $ 180 . and that was a few years ago )

if I should fined a suitable BB container ( I'll ask you to sleep on this ) might I do the oven bit " on its side " in the BVXL ?

I could always Gas Up the Weber .

nest would be BB, Boston baked Beans and Franks. a classic saturday BOS dinner.

thank you for providing us i.e. me with such insight.

PS I guess i could just buy a 1 lbs can of coffee and dump the coffee.

:huh:

now that you don't have to think about that, any ideas on Indian Pudding ?

its not that easy to make, as improperly made its " a bit gummy " IP might be just the ticket

but Id guess the Rx might be difficult to find and its very regional.

some be cause of the molasses ( black -strap ) and potential gummy-ness.

If you remember during our last Manitoulin adventure I did buy a 1 pound can of coffee and dumped the coffee because I made a loaf of steamed bread up there. I was smart enough to bring the coffee can home with me. If I knew then what I know now I would prepare the can a little differently. Instead of taking off the rim I would leave it in place take the bottom off with a Can Opener, Push the bottom through and rest it agaist that rim and it now becomes very helpful to push out a loaf of bread when it is cooked. I will try to give you a link to the photographs in the Manitoulin thread later on . I don't like baked beans and I'm not familiar with Indian pudding.

I am enjoying this bread but doubt it can qualify as the stuff I knew as Boston Brown.

Edited to add

I did bake it on its side in the BV XL Because it's too damned hot here to turn on the big oven.

Edited to add link

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/151520-manitoulin-if-i-can-make-it-there…/page-18#entry2024740

Leave that rim on and take the bottom out with the can opener and push it through so it rests on the rim.

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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nice,  excellent thinking as usual.

 

Ill look for a 1 lb can of coffee  ? ground did you buy ? Yucky whole beans ?

 

Im not being cheeky, I just don't know what Inner Can linings are these days.

 

thank you again for the time you spend giving Us  ( i.e. Me ) such insight.

 

Id suggest , look for large beets with tops, decently priced

 

and cut the minimal top and bottom off and IP whole.

 

Im using " pressure - steam "  i.e. the stuff is above the water

 

but if you don't peel the beets and can even leave a little top and all the bottom on 

 

"the jacket'  

 

do them whole.  it takes 20 + minutes more.  In the Water so to speak.

 

plenty of time for a Google, or an eG post.

 

but my sister assures me they are a snap to deal with after cooking.

 

she takes the beets cooke, and soaks them in cold water.

 

she does not have an IP  yet 

 

that's conventional boil-a-beet thinking

 

leaving the 'jacket' on would keep some of the Beet Goodness In the Beet.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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well IP sales are going to take off.  as I understand it, its a Canadian Company, eh ?

 

our members North of the Border probably bump into all of the Folks there frequently

 

Im not complaining, but I sure would enjoy a sturdy perforated optional SS insert w a nice SS handle

 

for Steam-Pressure

 

what I have works, fine enough  

 

but mention this to the IP folks next time you bump into them

 

the insert iconed in "Hip" and i think is available on the very high end stove top models

 

I know it won't be cheap.  but properly made  worth it.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I'm loving these tests and detailed notes. That potato salad looks like just the ticket! Thanks for the Penzeys spice mix recommendation, rotuts, as well as the TJ's South African Smoke spice anti-recommendation.

Anna N, that brown bread looks well worth trying. I wish I were brilliant enough to have thought of your coffee can treatment on my own. Since I'm not, I'm very pleased to take the idea and run with it!

rotuts, Don't Cut Raw Beets By Hand...at least, not without armored gloves. The microsurgeons may adore your choice of weapon, but they will not admire your judgment.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm loving these tests and detailed notes. That potato salad looks like just the ticket! Thanks for the Penzeys spice mix recommendation, rotuts, as well as the TJ's South African Smoke spice anti-recommendation.

Anna N, that brown bread looks well worth trying. I wish I were brilliant enough to have thought of your coffee can treatment on my own. Since I'm not, I'm very pleased to take the idea and run with it!

rotuts, Don't Cut Raw Beets By Hand...at least, not without armored gloves. The microsurgeons may adore your choice of weapon, but they will not admire your judgment.

I almost never have an original thought and the treatment of the coffee can was gleaned from various places on the World Wide Web. I would give credit but it was not just one site but many.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I just can't see this Your Way

 

collecting ideas from here and there are vital  

 

then you mash them up and say 

 

"" well consider it this way ""

 

that's the key.

 

FD  I covet a 1 lb can similarly 'cleaned ' lined as yours

 

thinking as you had at the "island" before hand

 

and now noticing a Mod

 

Q.E.D.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Id like to Review a Bit :

 

your Ideas on the Can are Original

 

and very very worth-while.

 

what's brilliant ?  who can say

 

in your defense 

 

i can almost Hear the CSB in the Closet Moan

 

On the IsLand , so forsaken   

 

almost, OK after a bit of MR

 

just because it does what it does

 

and perfectly 

 

just a few things

 

making any of those E.M's soon ?

 

Q.E.D.

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image.jpg

Of course it can make marmalade!

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg

And with a whole lot less mess and bother.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Oh My

 

Anna N

 

lets review a bit :

 

Oh My

 

would you consider a bit more detail ?

 

what jars did you use ? did they fit in the IP or did you deal with them differently ?

 

what is your ref for the time 'dans le pot ' for the cooing ?

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I used to think I detested marmalade: too sweet, too sticky, sometimes also bitter, and generally an insult to good oranges. Then a friend gave me some kumquat marmalade she'd made, and it was lovely. Now, seeing your lemon-lime setup. I wonder whether I've been missing something wonderful. Can you describe the level of sweetness? Finally, and most importantly for this topic: does the IP make this easier somehow? Is this a special recipe?

Edited for focus.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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... Finally, and most importantly for this topic: does the IP make this easier somehow? Is this a special recipe?

Anna, in re-reading your post on marmalade I now see the clear comment that it's a lot less fuss and bother. My other question remains: is it a special recipe or is a new technique required? And a new question: what is that thing that looks like an oversized safety pin in the last photo?
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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Years ago I came upon a jar of lime marmalade. It was a commercial marmalade but it really opened my eyes to how interesting marmalade could be after being accustomed to Robertsons' Thick Cut for most of my life. For my husband I used to get the Seville oranges when they came in and make a scotch marmalade which was truly scotch because it had so much malt whiskey in it!

When I came across this recipe from Laura's site I knew I had to try it but that I wanted limes in my marmalade. I recently posted about my attempt to candy lime peels so was reluctant to go with all limes. And if you read the comments that follow the recipe you will note that somebody tried making it with just limes and it was too bitter to be edible. So I riffed off Laura's recipe using both lemons and limes.

Her suggestion was to use a mandolin to thinly slice the citrus fruit. I started out that way and quickly realized that I was one second away from a need to visit the emergency room and abandoned the mandolin while my fingers were still intact. Again in the comments someone had mentioned using a food processor to slice the citrus. Seemed a whole lot safer to me even if it did not result in delightfully even quartered limes and lemons .

I dug out as many pips as I could and put them in a tea strainer which is the thing you see looking like a giant kilt pin.

The cut up fruit and the juice was put into the IP along with one cup of water. It was brought to high-pressure and allowed to cook for 12 minutes. I let it cool down slowly. When I opened the lid I checked to see how the lime peels had done. If anything I would reduce the cooking time the next time to 10 minutes to leave just a little bite in the peel.

I had weighed the fruit and juice before putting it in the IP and it was 646 g so I added 1292 g of sugar and stirred it in. I left it for about an hour just like that while I waited for the dishwasher to complete its cycle with my sterilized jars inside.

Once I knew the dishwasher was almost finished I turned the IP to sauté mode (high) and brought the fruit and sugar to a boil. I took it to about 212°F, checked for wrinkling on a cold plate, then ladled it into jars. I did not process it since there is so little and it will be refrigerated.

Happy to answer any questions that I haven't covered.

Edited because this machine thinks it's smarter than I am!

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Mmmpomps

 

i have a question about that fine looking chicken you IP'd:

 

was the breast meat 'dry?'  

 

as ask this in the sense that my understanding of how meat 'cooks', from the SV thread, is that at different temps there are various changes in meats components.

 

at a certain temp the muscle contracts, squeezing out moisture to the cooking medium.  Fat also melts out leading to possibly a dry feel in the mouth.

 

Id guess that breast meat might then have a very different taste-mouth feel that dark, which has more intramuscular fat.

 

I do plan on trying an IP'd Ck at some point, thanks to your posts.

 

I do Vertical Chicken on the gas grill w GrillGrates   ( 6 or so at a time )   I inhale the wings and pull off the meat when still warm and chill / bag / freeze for later.

 

in the past the carcasses and tidbits on them got Chucked.  now I can see an easy step w the IP ( stock ) before they leave for good.

 

Im looking forward to this.

 

Hey Rotus :)

 

The breast meat came out very similar to roasting a bird whole. It wasn't too dry, but of course not as moist as the yummy dark meat! I used the two breasts in my IP Chicken Noodle Soup I made tonite and will post it in a bit :)

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I love how tonites IP Adventure is using up all the 'left overs' I created IN the Instant Pot. I really dig that...I like to make many meals from the foods I use! Chicken Noodle Soup

Saute in butter and olive oil: chopped onion celery and carrot *garlic for me too*

11942200_10153017720587703_5907493683187412704_o.jpg

The chicken stock I made a few days ago in the IP! It is so gelatinous and I defatted it.

11950195_10153017720597703_400051216438560748_o.jpg

 

Diced the chicken breasts from the whole Chicken I cooked in the IP. Add to the pot with bay leaves, pinch of cayenne, salt and pepper, garlic powder and a pinch of poultry seasoning11935217_10153017720592703_7787662102931834170_o.jpg

 

Manual Pressure for 5 minutes and let it be then release pressure after five minutes...I'm cooking the Noodles separately since this soup will be frozen in individual portions for lunches!

11907147_10153017778402703_5430053770371759630_o.jpg

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Mmmpomps,

Your soup looks delicious.

So occasionally one must stop playing however much one enjoys it and kiss the toads. This morning I knew I had to tackle my freezer drawer which was threatening never to close again. It is now all cleaned up and inventoried. Of course I found stuff that could go into the stockpot including some chicken pieces and a couple of quail have seen better days. So my reward is

image.jpg

which is now nestled in ice in my sink.

My lagniappe: The quaill breasts. I checked and they still have lots of flavour. I am thinking of turning them into rillettes. I do not want to take this topic off Point again so follow me on the lunch or dinner threads if you care what happens with the quail.

Making stock in the IP is not an especially interesting exercise. It's quick and convenient.

Want to make some more brown bread this afternoon but using something closer to what I recall. I am tossing up two recipes -- One by Jasper White on Epicurious and one from Saveur magazine by way of the blog "Closet Cooking".

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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the beets that have sit in the pickling medium reused from Ba-tampte were quite good today.   the medium might need longer to penetrate and would probably

 

benefit from some fresh onion, and perhaps some garlic 'cubes' from the frozen TJ's paste ( from Israel ).  and more vinegar .  clearly ill need to come up with a Home

 

Version.   I do have the book Shelby recommended , from the library , and Ill look that over.

 

Surprisingly, in my area 1 lbs 'traditional' metal coffee cans are very hard to find and might not exist.  I found this one at Stop&Shop :

 

Can.jpg

 

its 11 oz.  Ill adjust the Rx volume after an initial trial.

 

most coffee in either in bags, plastic 'jars' or larger cans.  at least this one was 'house' and only 2 bucks

 

TJ's has 14 oz containers but they are some sort of cardboard like fiber board.

 

I also have to visit a neighbor for a traditional can opener as i use one of those 'side-biter' types

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Years ago I came upon a jar of lime marmalade. It was a commercial marmalade but it really opened my eyes to how interesting marmalade could be after being accustomed to Robertsons' Thick Cut for most of my life. For my husband I used to get the Seville oranges when they came in and make a scotch marmalade which was truly scotch because it had so much malt whiskey in it!

When I came across this recipe from Laura's site I knew I had to try it but that I wanted limes in my marmalade. I recently posted about my attempt to candy lime peels so was reluctant to go with all limes. And if you read the comments that follow the recipe you will note that somebody tried making it with just limes and it was too bitter to be edible. So I riffed off Laura's recipe using both lemons and limes.

Her suggestion was to use a mandolin to thinly slice the citrus fruit. I started out that way and quickly realized that I was one second away from a need to visit the emergency room and abandoned the mandolin while my fingers were still intact. Again in the comments someone had mentioned using a food processor to slice the citrus. Seemed a whole lot safer to me even if it did not result in delightfully even quartered limes and lemons .

I dug out as many pips as I could and put them in a tea strainer which is the thing you see looking like a giant kilt pin.

The cut up fruit and the juice was put into the IP along with one cup of water. It was brought to high-pressure and allowed to cook for 12 minutes. I let it cool down slowly. When I opened the lid I checked to see how the lime peels had done. If anything I would reduce the cooking time the next time to 10 minutes to leave just a little bite in the peel.

I had weighed the fruit and juice before putting it in the IP and it was 646 g so I added 1292 g of sugar and stirred it in. I left it for about an hour just like that while I waited for the dishwasher to complete its cycle with my sterilized jars inside.

Once I knew the dishwasher was almost finished I turned the IP to sauté mode (high) and brought the fruit and sugar to a boil. I took it to about 212°F, checked for wrinkling on a cold plate, then ladled it into jars. I did not process it since there is so little and it will be refrigerated.

Happy to answer any questions that I haven't covered.

Edited because this machine thinks it's smarter than I am!

I make lime marmalade.

There is a trick to getting rid of the bitterness.

 

More later - someone is pounding on my back door.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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nice.  very nice.

 

a bit late  ......

 

You might consider following Our Dust.  

 

I follow Anna_N's, and the other Experienced Users here 

 

P.S. : I hope you gave the burro that delivered it a carrot or two from the Garden.

 

:laugh:

 

looking forward to your Analysis.

 

you do have a notebook   ...... ?

 

very important here.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I make lime marmalade.

There is a trick to getting rid of the bitterness.

 

More later - someone is pounding on my back door.

I would love to hear the trick, when Andie comes back and rescues us from the cliffhanger she left us with!

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Mmmpomps

 

i very much like your idea of keeping items already IP'd  

 

then using them with new items in the IP for something completely new

 

IE CkSoup.

 

delicious it looks, Ill say

 

I also like the idea here or in the SV thread or anyway of cooking something now, in portions that you plan to use later

 

Fz etc.

 

very nice.

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Mmmpomps

i very much like your idea of keeping items already IP'd

then using them with new items in the IP for something completely new

IE CkSoup.

delicious it looks, Ill say

I also like the idea here or in the SV thread or anyway of cooking something now, in portions that you plan to use later

Fz etc.

very nice.

So when I was comparing the two recipes for Boston brown bread which I mentioned before I was sucked into the Googlehole as so often happens to me! I decided to leave another version of the brown red for another day and instead attempt a white bread.I have come to trust Laura Pazzaglia's recipes a little more than I trust others and so I opted to try the recipe from her website for steamed white bread. I had no buttermilk and my yogurt is running low. Then I remembered that I had buttermilk powder and figured I would reconstitute it. It had been stored in my freezer so I was pretty certain of its freshness. It came without instructions for reconstitution but one site on the web suggested 1 tablespoon buttermilk powder two 1/4 cup water would work. The other way I deviated from the written recipe was to add 1/4 cup of grated cheddar to the dough an idea I gleaned from elsewhere on the web.Laura called for a 20 minute time under high-pressure after adding hot water to the IP and testing with the skua at the end of that time. My bread was not cooked so I returned it and gave it another four minutes. But no matter what this was surely an epic fail. The bread was heavy, sticky and doughy. It would've made a final pile for an offshore oil rig. I was terribly disappointed. Impossible to say at this point what was at fault… The reconstituted buttermilk, the addition of a little bit of cheese, operator error or something else. Perhaps the greatest issue would be expectations. Having never had this before I have nothing to compare it to. I did not expect it to be a clone of properly yeasted and risen white bread. I went on the search for a different recipe and found a YouTube video of a chap making white bread in an electric pressure cooker though not the IP. I followed that recipe but I added two minutes to the 20 minutes called for to give the bread a bit longer and offset an already hot IP. It was somewhat better but not by much. For the time being I think I will abandon this plan of action and return to the Boston brown bread which was most definitely edible. I've heard it said that if you're not failing then you need to move the goalposts!While all this was going on, rotuts and I were exchanging PMs. I am anxious that everyone has as much information as I am capable of sharing with you so I'm going to address the questions that arose in the PMs here.How the 1 pound coffee can got its name is a bit of a mystery because my can has exactly the same dimensions as the one rotuts found despite that his was labeled 11 ounces. Both are five and 1/2 inches tall and 4 inches in diameter.I found that I needed to turn the trivet upside down and fold its handles in so that the Can would fit in the IP. I also lined the base of the can with a disc of parchment paper. I sprayed it with olive oil. It is my opinion and only my opinion that it is better to use cool water, up to the midpoint of the can in the IP, to allow a longer slow climb to pressure. I think it gives the bread a bit longer to cook (but what do I know?)Does it matter if water seeps into the can if you have removed the bottom and allowed to top to rest on the rim as the new bottom?I doubt that it matters much. The cheesecake I made with the crumb crust had nothing to protect it from water seepage in its springform pan. It was not even covered! One might've expected a soggy crust but it was just fine and crispy. Does one remove the bread from the can as soon as it is finished cooking? Recipes are all over the place on this one. Some go so far as to say it let it cool in the pan, some suggest 5, 10 or more minutes and some suggest removing it immediately. I would tend to walk the middle line and let it cool for 10 minutes in the can before tipping it out onto a rack. Most recipes suggest it is enjoyed best while still warm. Boy I hope I have discharged all my responsibilities. I'll bet anything Andie has some good advice on handling steamed breads which seem to predate pressure cookers and exist in one form or another all over the world. While I was surfing I even found a recipe for steamed bread that used yeast and was given at least two rises.Tomorrow I may and I stress may attempt another brown bread.

  • Like 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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