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Msk

Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" (Part 2)

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Has anyone worked through the technique, and finished with a puree of the flakes?

I've done the potato flakes, I think I posted about it uptopic. I sautéed them in butter until browned, then added to a potato purée. I thought it worked pretty well.

Yes, you posted this way back on page 1! ...

Ahh! I knew I had seen it somewhere. I stepped backwards through each page yesterday, but gave up around page 3. I see that the flakes in the pestle are much like what I've made. Somewhat crumbled and a little sticky. Not quite powdery. To night I experiment with Yukons that were water bathed vs. Russets that were baked.

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I'm very interested to know whether all the enthusiastic followers of MC on here are "modernist" in other things: architecture? furniture? design? music (a bit harder that one but i'm thinking more 20th century classical vs Mozart rather than current)?

do they go together? or can you be v conservative in everything else but still be excited by the new in cooking?

(so far i've only sous vided some steak, some duck, some aspargus and some lamb shoulder. nothing done properly from MC - though all good - but i'm still on vol 1)

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I'm very interested to know whether all the enthusiastic followers of MC on here are "modernist" in other things: architecture? furniture? design?

For me, yes. I'm a fan of modernist architecture and design, but I have to admit I'll be curious if my taste evolves over time, of if that is just a product of when I became aware of design. I think we can tend to get "stuck" in a certain style once we latch onto it. I'm hoping that MC doesn't actually become a "fad," but rather a perspective that permeates food and cooking going forward.

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On 3-145 there is a short discussion of wet rendering fat in a pressure cooker. The authors state one should put the fat in a canning jar with baking soda and pressure cook for four hours. What pressure, 1 bar (15psi)? Also, how does the water come into play? Does it go into the sealed (?) jar (if so, how much?) or is the jar not sealed and set open with water in the cooker?

Am I missing a more in depth discussion on the subject?


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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On 3-145 there is a short discussion of wet rendering fat in a pressure cooker. The authors state one should put the fat in a canning jar with baking soda and pressure cook for four hours. What pressure, 1 bar (15psi)? Also, how does the water come into play? Does it go into the sealed (?) jar (if so, how much?) or is the jar not sealed and set open with water in the cooker?

Am I missing a more in depth discussion on the subject?

I don't think you're missing anything, though you may be making it more complicated than it is :smile:. Pretend you are pressure-canning a fat/water puree. The exact ratio of water isn't that important, you separate it out when the fat is rendered. I basically use enough water to make a barely-pourable puree.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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would the above pastrami compare to Montreal Hot Smoked Meat ?

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As far as I know the two are pretty much interchangeable. My understanding is that there may be slight differences between the most traditional pastrami and the most traditional smoked meat, but defined broadly the two are the same.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Work got busy and I just realized I have had my short ribs curing in the MC pastrami brine for over 5 days. Is there any issues with over curing your meat?

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I'll add myself to saying the pastrami is outstanding. I smoked it 3.5 hrs using grape vines. used short ribs. Super tender, nicely smoked and really flavorful.

photo.JPG

photo.JPG

So damn nice Jason. Very good work. Did you make the Saurkraut as well from MC?


Edited by FoodMan (log)

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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not wishing to Fire up the Flames

:laugh:

Montreal Hot Smoked meat at Schwartz' is very different to me than say Katz or another NY top of the line pastrami.

Ive never figured out why. I dont get to go to either place much but to me the MHSM at S is a gazilllion time better.

remember that might just be me. "smoke" never came across too much in NYC. its very good stuff, but MHSM has very deffinitve subtle smoke.

not like Low and Slow BBQ. different.

but thanks fpr jumping in.

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On 3-145 there is a short discussion of wet rendering fat in a pressure cooker. The authors state one should put the fat in a canning jar with baking soda and pressure cook for four hours. What pressure, 1 bar (15psi)? Also, how does the water come into play? Does it go into the sealed (?) jar (if so, how much?) or is the jar not sealed and set open with water in the cooker?

Am I missing a more in depth discussion on the subject?

I don't think you're missing anything, though you may be making it more complicated than it is :smile:. Pretend you are pressure-canning a fat/water puree. The exact ratio of water isn't that important, you separate it out when the fat is rendered. I basically use enough water to make a barely-pourable puree.

Figures. With all that is in Modernist Cuisine it is easy to get lost in the details. I've got a bunch of fat rendering right now.


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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Work got busy and I just realized I have had my short ribs curing in the MC pastrami brine for over 5 days. Is there any issues with over curing your meat?

There's no problem if you're equilibrium curing - I "over cured" the beef cheeks for the pastrami for 4 days or so, while they recommended 3 and it was perfect - definitely not too salty.

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I'll add myself to saying the pastrami is outstanding. I smoked it 3.5 hrs using grape vines. used short ribs. Super tender, nicely smoked and really flavorful.

So damn nice Jason. Very good work. Did you make the Saurkraut as well from MC?

Thanks! Alas, i did not. I used good real fermented sauerkraut (ingredients on bag were cabbage and salt), and MC Sauerkraut is just salt and cabbage (i think)...so i can't imagine it would taste THAT different.


Edited by jmolinari (log)

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One more bacon question. Most of mine is doing fine (2 days left before smoking!) but two pieces have a bit of light discoloration on it. Most of it is bright red/pinkish color but a few pieces have spots of a light brown. It doesn't look like mold or anything growing on it, just a different color. I'm not sure if that's a sign of spoilage (it's been in the fridge < 40 degrees the whole time) or maybe I didn't get any of the cure on that piece there or it's just moisture leaving or what. Does anyone have any knowledge on the topic?

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... and MC Sauerkraut is just salt and cabbage (i think)...so i can't imagine it would taste THAT different.

If the MC sauerkraut isn't modernist enough for you, over on Khymos Martin Lersch had a write up a while ago on Sang-Hoon Degeimbre's kimchi, which involves innocculation with lactic starter, sous vide for anaerobic fermentation, addition of yeast autolysate for flavor, and centrifuge clarification.

http://blog.khymos.org/2010/02/24/tfp2010-more-inspiration-from-asia-part-3/

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I've been doing some experiments with MC this past week. I haven't gone through any of the pictures yet, but I made the caramelized carrot soup, constructed blue cheese slices (based on the American cheese slice recipe), rendered pork fat and tried caramelizing onions in the pressure cooker.

The caramelized carrot soup was easy and delicious although slightly too sweet for my taste. A perfect amuse bouche, but I don't think I'd want a whole bowl. I did make some changes I used store bought carrot juice, didn't bother coring the carrots, didn't centrifuge anything and I added about 10% carrot juice to the pressure cooker, rather than water as a cautious step to prevent burning. I also made my own garnish, a ginger/serrano infused cream which I mixed into the soup.

The constructed blue cheese slices were easy to make and turned out perfectly. I used Rogue Creamery blue and scaled to 85 grams of cheese. I didn't use any salt because I thought the cheese already had enough in it. I also didn't have a good way to slice the final product, so once it was chilled I rolled it out between two pieces of plastic wrap. Not as easy as molding and slicing, but it was all I could do.

Rendering the fat was easy enough. I did experiment with it. I had two jars, one was a mixture of fat, water and baking soda blended and the other was chunks of fat with water and soda. Pressure cooked for 4 hours and the blended version had a much better extraction rate. Simple, clean fat much easier than other methods.

Lastly, the pressure cooked caramelized onions. I based the technique on the carrot soup recipe, but made some alterations, cutting back on the butter to about 10%. I pressure cooked for 40 minutes at 15 PSI and the onions were well caramelized, but there was a significant amount of onion juice and butter left in the cooker. I decided to puree the mixture and it tastes pretty good. Nice caramelized onion flavor with a buttery richness. I made a brioche with the puree and it turned our great - we ate half the loaf while it was cooling! The rest of the puree went into some crepes with a beef/mushroom filling, served with the constructed blue.

I will try to get pictures up sometime this weekend.


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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One more bacon question. Most of mine is doing fine (2 days left before smoking!) but two pieces have a bit of light discoloration on it. Most of it is bright red/pinkish color but a few pieces have spots of a light brown. It doesn't look like mold or anything growing on it, just a different color. I'm not sure if that's a sign of spoilage (it's been in the fridge < 40 degrees the whole time) or maybe I didn't get any of the cure on that piece there or it's just moisture leaving or what. Does anyone have any knowledge on the topic?

Phaz, you're probably just fine. If you can photograph, we might be able to say more, but it sounds like an area that's desiccated a bit more than the other areas: pretty typical stuff.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I've been doing some experiments with MC this past week. I haven't gone through any of the pictures yet, but I made the caramelized carrot soup, constructed blue cheese slices (based on the American cheese slice recipe), rendered pork fat and tried caramelizing onions in the pressure cooker.

The caramelized carrot soup was easy and delicious although slightly too sweet for my taste. A perfect amuse bouche, but I don't think I'd want a whole bowl. I did make some changes I used store bought carrot juice, didn't bother coring the carrots, didn't centrifuge anything and I added about 10% carrot juice to the pressure cooker, rather than water as a cautious step to prevent burning. I also made my own garnish, a ginger/serrano infused cream which I mixed into the soup.

The constructed blue cheese slices were easy to make and turned out perfectly. I used Rogue Creamery blue and scaled to 85 grams of cheese. I didn't use any salt because I thought the cheese already had enough in it. I also didn't have a good way to slice the final product, so once it was chilled I rolled it out between two pieces of plastic wrap. Not as easy as molding and slicing, but it was all I could do.

Rendering the fat was easy enough. I did experiment with it. I had two jars, one was a mixture of fat, water and baking soda blended and the other was chunks of fat with water and soda. Pressure cooked for 4 hours and the blended version had a much better extraction rate. Simple, clean fat much easier than other methods.

Lastly, the pressure cooked caramelized onions. I based the technique on the carrot soup recipe, but made some alterations, cutting back on the butter to about 10%. I pressure cooked for 40 minutes at 15 PSI and the onions were well caramelized, but there was a significant amount of onion juice and butter left in the cooker. I decided to puree the mixture and it tastes pretty good. Nice caramelized onion flavor with a buttery richness. I made a brioche with the puree and it turned our great - we ate half the loaf while it was cooling! The rest of the puree went into some crepes with a beef/mushroom filling, served with the constructed blue.

I will try to get pictures up sometime this weekend.

I would love to see those cheese slices. It's great that it worked out well with blue cheese.

Where the onions what you would call caramelized onions with a good texture or where they closer to onion jam?

My MC bacon comes out of the cure today and hopefully will be smoked next weekend. Looking forward to that.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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<snip>To everyone: I am currently aging the aromatic alsatian mustard to go with my pastrami (hopefully!), and, like Chris, misunderstood the directions and added the mustard seeds and the soaking vinegar, so the mustard is quite thin... What do you think is the best way to solve this issue? I could probably thicken the mustard with agar or xanthan, but I assume (I haven't tasted it yet) that it will be too vinegar-y....

Any ideas? <snip

I read further along that you have already sampled the mustard but if you have some left (or for the next person) here's two low-tech, non MC ideas...

1. Try draining it a little. Super-fine cheese cloth (called butter muslin) might work but a coffee filter would probably be better. Maybe drain half of it and scrape the residue (retained mustard) back into the rest to thicken?

2. Make another batch, draining the seeds before grinding and combine. That should get you at least half-way thick.

Good luck.


The Big Cheese

BlackMesaRanch.com

My Blog: "The Kitchen Chronicles"

BMR on FaceBook

"The Flavor of the White Mountains"

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I plan on doing a more formal write up on my website for each item, starting this Sunday with the soup. Until then, as promised, some pictures.

Caramelized carrot soup with carrot top garnish:

013%20edit%20wm.jpg

Caramelized onion puree:

05192011%20bleu%20cheese%20modernist%20crepe%20022%20edit%20wm.jpg

The onions were each distinct until I blended them with an immersion blender. I didn't actually test their texture by themselves. I would suspect 50 minutes at 15psi would give the same texture as a traditionally caramelized onion. At 40 minutes they seemed more substantial from what I can remember.

Constructed blue cheese:

05192011%20bleu%20cheese%20modernist%20crepe%20011%20edit%20wm.jpg

I'm fairly certain you could use any cheese you wanted with these techniques (I have used a variety). They give some good information on how to adjust for different cheeses based on moisture content and goals.

A crepe with the constructed blue and a mushroom, ground beef and onion puree filling:

05192011%20bleu%20cheese%20modernist%20crepe%20041%20edit%20wm.jpg


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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I'm finding that in using the low acyl gellan in various recipes I have had a lot of trouble with the gel clumping right after it comes to a boil. There is no doubt that the powder was dispersed well, so that isn't it. Does anybody have experience with this or other suggestions as to why it is happening?

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I made Modernist scrambled eggs and they were so insanely good my head almost exploded.

I blended them with my immersion blender. Cooked them for 25mins at 162. It was more an egg pudding than a scrambled egg. The flavor was amazing, and the consistency and texture unlike any eggs i've ever had.

I will say they were a little greasy from so much butter. Next time i'll reduce the amount by 50% or so.

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I plan on doing a more formal write up on my website for each item, starting this Sunday with the soup. Until then, as promised, some pictures.

Caramelized carrot soup with carrot top garnish:

013%20edit%20wm.jpg

Oh...this is sooo pretty! I love the dark orange color.

Bravo!

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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