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jmolinari

Curing and Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 5)

538 posts in this topic

Well, I finished curing bacon #1, and unfortunately, because of timing issues, had to roast it in the oven rather than smoke it. However!!-- it is absolutely delicious. I am really, really excited for when I can make another and use the apple wood that I tracked down.

It's got just enough resistance to your bite, and melting, delicious pockets of fat. Wow. My only complaint is that I used brown sugar instead of maple syrup, and it was a bit more on the savory side than I'd like my breakfast bacon to be.

Oh well. I guess I'll have to correct it next time.

Oh- and is Niman the consensus pick for ordering pork? I saw another-- Caw Caw Creek, I think-- does anyone have a strong case for anywhere else?

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Oh- and is Niman the consensus pick for ordering pork?  I saw another-- Caw Caw Creek, I think--  does anyone have a strong case for anywhere else?

I would like to know the answer to this as well. My local butchers are no help when it comes to finding pork belly.

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Yeah- the local butcher that I thought might know got a little misty-eyed when I asked. He responded "no one ever asks for that anymore..."

I ended up buying mine from an Asian market. Which is fine, I guess, but I'd like to see what I can do with top-of-the-line stuff.

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Though butchers at Whole Foods, I've gotten both Niman and Coleman (they're changing their name, but I can't find out what the new one is from their website), and while I prefer Niman, Coleman is significantly better than the Swift et al I can get at my local carnicarias.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I find the disparateness in quality of staff from my Whole Foods to yours disturbing, Chris. I'm not even sure they would know what to do if I asked them where to find pork belly at mine.

Once, I asked if they had any pancetta, and the guy at the counter told me they were completely out. Another employee overheard him and came over to show him they did, in fact, have some. Ahh... New Orleans.


Edited by MikeHartnett (log)

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I worked long and hard to establish a good relationship to the "Meat Team Leader" (I'd kill for a job title like that) at one of the stores here. Just start by asking them about availability, suppliers, and so on. They have been given greater leeway by corporate to do those sorts of orders, so it's a matter of people taking the time to support a good customer.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Oh- and is Niman the consensus pick for ordering pork?  I saw another-- Caw Caw Creek, I think--  does anyone have a strong case for anywhere else?

I would like to know the answer to this as well. My local butchers are no help when it comes to finding pork belly.

Flying Pigs farm is not cheap but it's really great stuff ... I buy from them at Union Square greenmarket in NYC but they sell online as well. Their pigs are large blacks, Gloucestershire old spots, and tamworths. Depending on what you're doing with the meat it can be worth the splurge. They supply David Chang's Momofuku restaurants here in NYC among others. www.flyingpigsfarm.com

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I found this smoker attachment that claims to "cold smoke" HERE

There is not much info about how it really works so I am hesitant..

Anyone Have any ideas on this or have possibly used it???

Thought it might be a nice cold smoke addition to the Kamado, with much less hassle...

Bud

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I have a hind leg from a wild boar (i love marin sun farms!) in my fridge. I'm about to pack it in salt and make a salted air-dried ham but I'm a little concerned about trichinosis. Also, there's no nitrite/nitrate in this cure?

Should I be worried due to the wild nature of the beast? :biggrin:

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I found this smoker attachment that claims to "cold smoke" HERE

There is not much info about how it really works so I am hesitant..

Anyone Have any ideas on this or have  possibly used it???

Thought it might be a nice cold smoke addition to the Kamado, with much less hassle...

Bud

Bud,

I have not tried the smoke pistol, but it looks a lot like a small smoke generator of the same technology of the Bradley smoker (which is what I use.) The packed wood pellet is about twice the size of a Bradley puck. The Bradley puck lasts about 20 minutes. The smoke pistol claims 3 hours from a pellet. Trying not to get into a math debate - I wonder if there is enough smoke for anything as large as a BGE?

On the cod smoke question - if there is enough heat to make smoke, your BGE is well insulated an might be too warm. It could work in a small cardboard box.

Paul

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I have a hind leg from a wild boar (i love marin sun farms!) in my fridge. I'm about to pack it in salt and make a salted air-dried ham but I'm a little concerned about trichinosis. Also, there's no nitrite/nitrate in this cure?

Should I be worried due to the wild nature of the beast? :biggrin:

Uhm...yes. I would be. I would deep freeze it before using it for however long the FDA recommends freezing it.

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I have a hind leg from a wild boar (i love marin sun farms!) in my fridge. I'm about to pack it in salt and make a salted air-dried ham but I'm a little concerned about trichinosis. Also, there's no nitrite/nitrate in this cure?

Should I be worried due to the wild nature of the beast? :biggrin:

Uhm...yes. I would be. I would deep freeze it before using it for however long the FDA recommends freezing it.

Actually, the USDA says it's fine!

http://www.foodsafety.gov/~lrd/9cf318.html

Look for section 318.10 and then scroll down a bunch until you reach the part about hams. It's quite involved but essentially you can *either* freeze the meat, or just follow a relatively normal curing schedule (although to meet their regulations, you need 1.5days/lb rather than the 1 day/lb that ruhlman suggests).

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As all readers of this massive topic know, it has become unwieldy. Thus we offer this index, to aid readers in finding all of the information our members have contributed over the years. We've also started this topic, for new discussions of the recipes in Ruhlman's book.

Thank you for participating! We look forward to more great contributions in the new topic!

 

 

[Moderator note: This topic continues here, Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 6)]


Edited by Mjx Note added. (log)

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