Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chris Hennes

Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (Part 1)

Recommended Posts

I did the technique for the eggplant parm in a microwave. But I only did the eggplant pieces. This was a revelation for me, it is fast and easy and made delicious and tender eggplant with concentrated flavor. This will be my go to method for making eggplant since it is extremely low in fat, and the eggplant is delightfully tender.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is the simplified jus gras to be served immediately? Can it not be refrigerated for a day or two and then reheated for service?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the carrot soup as my first recipe and was very happy with it. It sure is rich though, and best ingested in small amounts.

Last night I made recipe no. 2, the garlic confit. I followed the instructions including turning the lid back to loosen it a bit after sealing the jar. After about the first hour my previously perfectly quiet pressure cooker sounded as though something was rocking inside. After the two hour cooking period was up, and I opened it, I discovered that a good inch of the olive oil had escaped from the jar. Does anyone know why this happened? Did I loosen the jar too much? The two rings on the guage were just visible and my (induction) stove was set at 2.8.

Jar level sounds fine -- enough headspace. Did you let the pressure come down naturally after cooking? Quick release will often lead to a mess inside the pressure cooker as the jar contents maintain their pressure and will boil violently in the lower pressure environment of a rapidly cooling pressure cooker.

I let the pressure come down naturally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the carrot soup, is it necessary to strain the blended ingrediants if you're using a high power blender?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is the simplified jus gras to be served immediately? Can it not be refrigerated for a day or two and then reheated for service?

Most likely because the emulsion will break. If there aren't any stabilizers in there, then the fat will simply separate out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My copy landed the other day. Cooking extensively from it this weekend. As I type this the pressure cooked pork adobo is ticking away. Or whistling away, even. I'm also making the home jus gras to serve with turkey tomorrow (turkey done in three different ways, including the cured wing from the original Modernist Cuisine) and the sous vide creme anglaise.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is the simplified jus gras to be served immediately? Can it not be refrigerated for a day or two and then reheated for service?

Most likely because the emulsion will break. If there aren't any stabilizers in there, then the fat will simply separate out.

It calls for lecithin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ended up using something like 85% water for the cheese sauce for the M&C, came out pretty well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this question belongs here, or in the Sous vide topic, but I am hedging my bets and placing it here. I just purchased the sper scientific 2 channel type K thermometer and looking for a needle probe that can be submerged, at least partly while in the bath. Everything I am finding that specifically says waterproof is over 200 bucks. Does anyone know which one was used in the book or a good one they have worked with?

John


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What type of connector does it have?

You can do a little research on McMaster-Carr.

Its the type K/J connector. I will have looked around, but seems as I mentioned, anything that can be submersed is super $.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this question belongs here, or in the Sous vide topic, but I am hedging my bets and placing it here. I just purchased the sper scientific 2 channel type K thermometer and looking for a needle probe that can be submerged, at least partly while in the bath. Everything I am finding that specifically says waterproof is over 200 bucks. Does anyone know which one was used in the book or a good one they have worked with?

John

How about this?

http://www.phidgets.com/products.php?product_id=3108_1

~Martin


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would probably have better luck getting one meant for kitchen use, they're a lot more affordable (and usually use thermistors instead of thermocouples). $50 is pretty standard for a lab grade thermocouple.

I got this and it works fine.


Edited by Baselerd (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

I am very happy to have found this forum.

I recently purchase the book MC@H and yesterday I tried the Turkey leg confit at 140F (60c) for 24hrs. I buy mostly all my meat from a local organic farm and he said he only as a new bread and it is wild turkey the color of the legs were very brownish kind of like duck. The were smaller About 800g total, so instead of using 40g of salts I used 30g and 3g of sugar.

The result was way too salty and the meat wasn’t tender at all, even hard to cut with a knife. I have done the regular confit with duck in the oven and it was very tender so I was very disappointed to finally open the sous vide bag and see the result after 24hrs.

I only put the duck fat on one side of the bag, maybe I should have rubbed it all over the legs beforehand. I packed both legs in one bag.

Was the meat suppose to be tender, I heard that sous vide confit is not as tender than normal tradition.

If someone can help me, maybe I have done something wrong.

Thank you.


Patrick Provencal

Montreal, Canada

Cooking from the Heart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

I am very happy to have found this forum.

I recently purchase the book MC@H and yesterday I tried the Turkey leg confit at 140F (60c) for 24hrs. I buy mostly all my meat from a local organic farm and he said he only as a new bread and it is wild turkey the color of the legs were very brownish kind of like duck. The were smaller About 800g total, so instead of using 40g of salts I used 30g and 3g of sugar.

The result was way too salty and the meat wasn’t tender at all, even hard to cut with a knife. I have done the regular confit with duck in the oven and it was very tender so I was very disappointed to finally open the sous vide bag and see the result after 24hrs.

I only put the duck fat on one side of the bag, maybe I should have rubbed it all over the legs beforehand. I packed both legs in one bag.

Was the meat suppose to be tender, I heard that sous vide confit is not as tender than normal tradition.

If someone can help me, maybe I have done something wrong.

Thank you.

Patmatrix,

I think the main problem would be the kind of turkey that you are using. The salt and sugar ratio that you used is actually less than what is called for in the recipe, so that shouldn't have been a problem. It is, however, important that the salt and sugar is sprinkled evenly over the legs. And indeed, as you said, the fat does need to be evenly distributed around the meat, in the bag. But, mainly I think that your wild turkey legs have two main differences with the legs that we used for testing. First, they probably have less fat content. And second, they probably have less water content. The lack of fat and water would throw off the cure ratio and result in a dryer and tougher texture. This is because the leg is becoming, essentially, overcured. If you would like to try to make the wild turkey work, might I suggest that you decrease the cure to 800g legs :: 20g salt :: 2g sugar, and also try cooling the meat in the bag before eating it. This should keep the legs moist. Let me know if I can help you further.

Johnny


Johnny Zhu
Research and Development Chef for Modernist Cuisine
johnny@modernistcuisine.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

I am very happy to have found this forum.

I recently purchase the book MC@H and yesterday I tried the Turkey leg confit at 140F (60c) for 24hrs. I buy mostly all my meat from a local organic farm and he said he only as a new bread and it is wild turkey the color of the legs were very brownish kind of like duck. The were smaller About 800g total, so instead of using 40g of salts I used 30g and 3g of sugar.

The result was way too salty and the meat wasn’t tender at all, even hard to cut with a knife. I have done the regular confit with duck in the oven and it was very tender so I was very disappointed to finally open the sous vide bag and see the result after 24hrs.

I only put the duck fat on one side of the bag, maybe I should have rubbed it all over the legs beforehand. I packed both legs in one bag.

Was the meat suppose to be tender, I heard that sous vide confit is not as tender than normal tradition.

If someone can help me, maybe I have done something wrong.

Thank you.

Patmatrix,

I think the main problem would be the kind of turkey that you are using. The salt and sugar ratio that you used is actually less than what is called for in the recipe, so that shouldn't have been a problem. It is, however, important that the salt and sugar is sprinkled evenly over the legs. And indeed, as you said, the fat does need to be evenly distributed around the meat, in the bag. But, mainly I think that your wild turkey legs have two main differences with the legs that we used for testing. First, they probably have less fat content. And second, they probably have less water content. The lack of fat and water would throw off the cure ratio and result in a dryer and tougher texture. This is because the leg is becoming, essentially, overcured. If you would like to try to make the wild turkey work, might I suggest that you decrease the cure to 800g legs :: 20g salt :: 2g sugar, and also try cooling the meat in the bag before eating it. This should keep the legs moist. Let me know if I can help you further.

Johnny

Thank you for the quick reply! I will consider what you advise for next time.

Overall is cooking confit sousvide supose to be very tender as well if done corectly?

Thank you.


Patrick Provencal

Montreal, Canada

Cooking from the Heart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for the quick reply! I will consider what you advise for next time.

Overall is cooking confit sousvide supose to be very tender as well if done corectly?

I make SV confit duck all the time (admittedly not from the MC@H recipe) and the method you describe sounds very strange. SV for 24 hours with that much salt in the bag? Surely they mean to ask you to leave the legs in salt for a few hours, then wash it off and confit for 24 hours?

If done correctly, SV confit is a great alternative to the normal method. Much less wastage of duck fat, cleaner, and more convenient. And it tastes no different - dare I say better.


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like Kieth, I have made SV confit (duck and turkey, probably in equal proportions) and always did the cure/rinse then SV (typically for a lot less then 24 hours). The result is a bit salty if you ate it 'plain', but is dead on if you eat it in salad, etc. It has always been extremely tender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Er, with all their confit recipes I'm pretty sure you do exactly what Keith describes ... which is exactly what you do for confit in general, whether it's sous vide or traditional. Cure. Rinse. Dry. Cook. Steps two and three are as important as the first and last.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The recipe does say to seal the lot in the bag and cook. I assume that they have used some sort of equilibrium brine calculation so that it cures while cooking rather than as a separate step. The MC version is mix, seal, cook, recook, serve. If the turkey composition was different, as suggested, this would explain why it didn't work in this case.


Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for the quick reply! I will consider what you advise for next time.

Overall is cooking confit sousvide supose to be very tender as well if done corectly?

I make SV confit duck all the time (admittedly not from the MC@H recipe) and the method you describe sounds very strange. SV for 24 hours with that much salt in the bag? Surely they mean to ask you to leave the legs in salt for a few hours, then wash it off and confit for 24 hours?

If done correctly, SV confit is a great alternative to the normal method. Much less wastage of duck fat, cleaner, and more convenient. And it tastes no different - dare I say better.

The books clearly states 2 legs (2.2 pounds) sprinkle with 40g salt & 4g sugar and then in the bag and even to put the left over that did not stick, in the bag as well. Being that mine was only 800g total I have put 30g & 4g. I think the call that technique hot cure.

That is why I had to ask you guys about it, the saltiest meal I ever eat! Felt bad four hours after that, drinking litters of liquids…


Patrick Provencal

Montreal, Canada

Cooking from the Heart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The turkey confit recipe in MCAH is not a traditional method. The cure is meant to be included in the bag and not washed off. The recipe actually states that you should keep any cure that doesn't stick to the meat, and include it in the bag. A classic confit method cures the meat before it is cooked. Our method posits that the curing can be achieved during the long cooking process, and our testing backs that up. That is also why our curing ratios are probably lower than traditional recipes.


Johnny Zhu
Research and Development Chef for Modernist Cuisine
johnny@modernistcuisine.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The turkey confit recipe in MCAH is not a traditional method. The cure is meant to be included in the bag and not washed off. The recipe actually states that you should keep any cure that doesn't stick to the meat, and include it in the bag. A classic confit method cures the meat before it is cooked. Our method posits that the curing can be achieved during the long cooking process, and our testing backs that up. That is also why our curing ratios are probably lower than traditional recipes.

I will do it again with a traditional bird...ty all for the input.


Patrick Provencal

Montreal, Canada

Cooking from the Heart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By K8CanCook
      Update!! --- the sale is still going on at Amazon as of Sunday (11/24) at 11:15am EST
      ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
       
      Did anyone note the sale price on Modernist Cuisine today (maybe yesterday)? Amazon and Target dropped the set of tomes to $379!!!
       
      This price looks like it will change after today...so get it ASAP!!!

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0982761007?pf_rd_p=183f5289-9dc0-416f-942e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=SRFCHFB5EFTGAA8AZHJX
      -or-
      https://www.target.com/p/modernist-cuisine-by-nathan-myhrvold-chris-young-maxime-bilet-hardcover/-/A-77279948
    • By Kim Shook
      I think about this subject fairly often, but especially when I am thinking about converting a slow cooker recipe to sous vide.  While I love the texture and juiciness I get with sous vide, I find that I often want a sauce.  And I have quite a few slow cooker recipes that I know have good sauces, but the meat tends to be a little on the dry side.  Thus my ideas about converting.  I thought this might be a topic with legs if other folks are having the same questions.  
       
      I'd like to make this recipe: Cranberry Pork Roast.  I found a nice little pork loin roast (2.88 lb.) and have rubbed it with Penzey's Ozark seasoning and sucked it (family lingo for vacuum bagging).  My thought is to sous vide it and make the sauce on the side and just serve it with/in/on top of the sauce.  Advice?  Thoughts?  Warnings?  Also, if you think that this is more of an IP thing tell me that, too.  And, considering that the sauce is sweet, would you do it in steps in the IP?  
       
      Thanks so much!  
    • By Bollo
      I need a book on the application of rotavapor machine. I've searched something on web but i can't find something strictly professional for the kitchen please help me. To improve the research. 
    • By Okanagancook
      I was reminded the other day of the egg-in-plastic-wrap-poach method.
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...