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Mjx

eG Foodblog: Mjx (2012) – Elderflowers, Strawberries, and Game

121 posts in this topic

many thanks I love the open faced sandwiches!

are there

Smörgåsbord

in your area? are they popular? I recall some that had more types of herring than one could count!

(note the Copy/paste !)

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This is great - I would have commented earlier, but just spent 2 weeks in Crete (away from the wet, cold Danish summer). It is so much fun to read an outside view on Denmark and the foods here. Even more so because I grew up in Århus (sorry, Aarhus :wink: ) and used to live just around the corner from the Market, and as a kid, we'd go to the harbour in Norsminde on a nice day.

You might want to try all-spice in the frikadeller for a boost of flavour..... Lovage is traditionally used for very little, but pop a sprig in when you boil those 'aquarium' (scrubbed, not peeled) potatoes, and it adds a lovely, summery flavour. Your take on smørrebrød looks good. By husband, an Englishman, get grief at all family events for having heering on white bread and gravlax on rugbrød (black rye bead).

Keep it coming !

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many thanks I love the open faced sandwiches!

are there

Smörgåsbord

in your area? are they popular? I recall some that had more types of herring than one could count!

(note the Copy/paste !)

That's Swedish (the ö instead of the ø gives that away)! In Danish it's called det kolde bord ('the cold table'), and basically, it's just the stuff that gets made for lunch, although more substantial and varied selections show up at events like julefrokoster (where you can find a fair number of different kinds of herring, but since by the end of the night it may well be being used for body sild, I'm not sure this really gets noticed).

This is great - I would have commented earlier, but just spent 2 weeks in Crete (away from the wet, cold Danish summer). It is so much fun to read an outside view on Denmark and the foods here. Even more so because I grew up in Århus (sorry, Aarhus :wink: ) and used to live just around the corner from the Market, and as a kid, we'd go to the harbour in Norsminde on a nice day.

You might want to try all-spice in the frikadeller for a boost of flavour..... Lovage is traditionally used for very little, but pop a sprig in when you boil those 'aquarium' (scrubbed, not peeled) potatoes, and it adds a lovely, summery flavour. Your take on smørrebrød looks good. By husband, an Englishman, get grief at all family events for having heering on white bread and gravlax on rugbrød (black rye bead).

Keep it coming !

Thanks! I actually enjoy the Danish summer and feel a bit guilty about it, because when everyone is looking out the window and wishing it would stop raining, I'm hoping it will just keep on

I made a note to give allspice a go in frikadeller, they really do need something to bring out the flavour.

And scrubbed, hm? I should have noticed that...


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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We made a quick trip to a small ‘farm shop’ nearby, which manages to be a sort of greengrocer/general store: the owners sell an intriguing array of things, in addition to their own produce (and others’):

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Various juices and some ceramic ware:

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A terrific selection of liquorice:

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Some cook books,

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and the omnipresent scrubbed (thanks, Mette!) potatoes in water.

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They also sell chalk paint, slippers, watering cans and garden gnomes (that’s just the tip of the iceberg).

There’s a good-sized green house right next to the shop, where you can get various flowers and herbs in pots, and there’s a very substantial grape vine occupying about a third of the roof (the green mass at the far end):

L_DSCN8102.jpg

Dinner was venison with the fennel and carrots I picked up at the farm shop. There were a few changes to the original plan, and the hokkaido-chestnut soup was broken down into hokkaido puree and caramelized chestnuts.

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Tonight, we had dinner with my boyfriend’s parents:

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And now I’m sitting here, finishing off the last of tonight’s wine ;)


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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So, how's about another week of blogging :wub: ! This is great!!!

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Your blog has been so gorgeous, visually and otherwise, The way that you pair your foods fascinates me. Although I eat very differently than you, there is such a common feeling to your habits- the homemade breads and attention to fresh vegetables especially. Thank you so much for sharing with us here!


More Than Salt

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That last meal looks wonderfully tasty, and that table setting is beautiful: simple, connecting nicely to the summer outdoors. Thank you for sharing your week with us!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Thanks to everyone who followed along this week (and to Kristoffer, Inge, Helene, Lasse, and Mads, who have invariably answered my apparently endless questions about Danish food with apparently endless patience)! I hope you enjoyed seeing this tiny bit of a Danish summer through the eyes of a foreigner as much as I have, and I leave you with my latest find, pineapple strawberries (yep, they smell of pineapple):

PineappleStrawberries.jpg


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Many thanks for such a fine week!

:biggrin:

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It's been fantastic!! thanks for showing us your world!!

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Thank you so much for a beautiful blog, Michaela!

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Michaela, thanks for all the informative words, gorgeous photos and exquisite seafood.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Those strawberries are just stunning. Beautiful!

That jellyfish looks like a lion's mane -- powerful stingers. Be careful!

Thanks for a wonderful and interesting blog. Are you sure it's supposed to be done? I don't think it is...

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Dinner; rice with chicken sausage, shrimp, and duck, with baby greens on the side:

Prep1.jpg

(A bit late to the game but:) Ha! I have that exact same bottle of Penzey's dried fennel seed, and used it in two different recipes today. Most likely bought it at the same stand in Grand Central - I live 6 blocks away. Shock of the familiar.

Margarine in Denmark? I always associate the country with Lurpak, since that's the brand of butter I usually buy.

I like the look of the open-faced sandwiches. Or have they just not been topped with a second slice? I see later you say you haven't done smørrebrød yet. We had tons when we were in Copenhagen, but that was 12 years ago. For a long time, my partner made them for me and company on my birthday, using the book from this restaurant:

492675166_afa9eed824.jpg

Markets look excellent. Produce looks excellent. Enjoying this blog already.

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Nobody ever mentioned elderberry pie.

And, once upon a time I won the 4-H "bouquet of the day" at the Illinois State Fair, with a bouquet of elderberry flowers and bittersweet berries in an iron skillet!

Thanks a bunch for blogging from a person who almost always prefers dairy with her meat. :rolleyes:


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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. . . .

Margarine in Denmark? I always associate the country with Lurpak, since that's the brand of butter I usually buy.

I like the look of the open-faced sandwiches. Or have they just not been topped with a second slice? I see later you say you haven't done smørrebrød yet. . . .

Most of the Danes I've met seem to favour margarine (when my boyfriend's mother needs butter for a recipe, she usually borrows it from me, since she rarely buys it). Lurpak is a popular brand , but mostly because it's almost the only brand of butter you find in many supermarkets.

The thing about smørrebrød is that it simply means 'buttered bread' (smør is 'butter', and brød is 'bread'), so it effectively covers a really broad range, from plain bread and butter to the most elaborate sandwiches (these are always open-faced). On festive occasions there is often at least a gesture towards the formal, traditional combinations, usually as part of a larger kolde bord (the Danish equivalent of the Swedish smorgåsbord), but the general trend in sandwich-making here is pretty much the universal 'let's see what we've got in the refrigerator... oh, better use that up!'


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Thank you for a wonderful week Michaela!

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