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eG Foodblog: Sheepish (2012) - Eating and drinking in a Welsh farmhous


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More updates from this afternoon. Heating muscavado sugar and star anise before adding to egg yolks to make a parfait.

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Folded in whipped cream and poured into cling film lined ring molds.

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Beef bourguignon done. Meat is so tender it was falling apart as I was picking it up. Liquid is strained and added back to meat and left to cool.

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3 pans on the go. Clockwise : 1) parkin puree - more muscavado, the ginger syrup, orange peel, orange and lemon juice. agar agar added to this as a thickener. 2) clementine juice reducing before being used for clementine jelly. 3) lemon jam. a dot of this is needed with the chees crisps

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My vegetable scraps bin in the kitchen was full so I've taken the opportunity for a pic of the "vegetable" garden. Looking a bit overgrown and unproductive at this time of year.

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Sheep got in last winter and seemingly destroyed our two bay trees. One has come back well this year and the other is at least still alive.

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Gratuitous landscape shot

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And finally eating sheep. These are ram lambs from last year. They'll get fatter by June or July which is when they go to the abattoir.

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The laverbread looks interesting. Is the texture smooth and gelatinous or? And the flavor, minerally? That is a nice tub of cockle meat. Are they cooked, picked out and packed? Did you eat them just cold as they are or do something further?

Your multitasking in the kitchen is praiseworthy! Are all those pots destined to be hand-washed? If so do you employ some sort of routine to help you deal with the aftermath of a cooking extravaganza?

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Ooooooh, I'm so going to try your ginger beer drink. I have some of those languishing in my cabinet. Do you like a particular kind of tequila?

Having tasted tequila for the first time ever two weeks ago, and still working through that same bottle I think it's safe to say I have no idea. I didn't even know there were kinds of tequila. I can appreciate there are different qualities. I need to do more research!

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The laverbread looks interesting. Is the texture smooth and gelatinous or? And the flavor, minerally? That is a nice tub of cockle meat. Are they cooked, picked out and packed? Did you eat them just cold as they are or do something further?

Your multitasking in the kitchen is praiseworthy! Are all those pots destined to be hand-washed? If so do you employ some sort of routine to help you deal with the aftermath of a cooking extravaganza?

Laverbread is smooth more than gelatinous. A pleasing mouth feel. And yes, minerally. Not assertive. I can understand some people not appreciating it. Cockles come picked and cooked. I've never seen them still in the shell. Quite common to see someone of advanced years asking for a small pot and the fishmonger has the vinegar so they can be enjoyed on the spot. To eat with breakfast I heat them through in the last of the bacon fat, but they are nice cold with vinegar too.

Everything hand washed. I'm all in favour of labour saving, but I find I generally want to reuse that pan 5 minutes into a 90 minute cleaning cycle. Just not a fast enough turnaround. Routine is cook til there is no more workspace or utensils. Clean and put everything away. Start again. That is until it's time to dish up courses and then it's just pile everything into the sink and hope there are enough pans to warm stuff.

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Ooooooh, I'm so going to try your ginger beer drink. I have some of those languishing in my cabinet. Do you like a particular kind of tequila?

Having tasted tequila for the first time ever two weeks ago, and still working through that same bottle I think it's safe to say I have no idea. I didn't even know there were kinds of tequila. I can appreciate there are different qualities. I need to do more research!

I don't know anything about tequila, either, so we're in the same boat :biggrin:

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Wonderful blog - such a contrast to urban offerings!

Enjoying your sense of humour in details, AND Mutt On's comments.

I'll have to check my sources about using large pig intestines so you can really make use of the whole pig! I just remember my mother stuffing it with sticky rice and black beans (can't remember anything else as I was pretty young). The "sausage" is steamed, sliced and served with a dipping sauce. Pig stomach - braised - SO good! I also used them in dried tofu stick soup along with rehydrated oysters. The braised stomaches are sold in Chinese BBQ shops.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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So the camera ran out of batteries and I was getting a bit behind schedule, so skip to the end. Here's dinner.

We go a dozen bottles of '96 Dom Ruinart as a wedding present from my brother in law. Last bottle gone tonight, but it's a special occasion so, hey. Gruyere crisps with cheval blanc mouse filling and a blob of lemon jam. The lemon jam on it's own was bitter and unpromising. With the cheese it really lifted everything.

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Next up, jerusalem artichokes, or plain old sunchokes depending on how far west you live. These were lovely. I'm always after a dish to highlight nothing but vegetables, and this is a great winter option. I think this looks pretty. Remember this because it's all downhill from here.

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Served with a very good Gerwurtzraminer my sister bought me for my birthday. The weight of this was just right and it took the picked 'chokes and mustard seeds in its stride.

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Been a bit busy today. Hadn't got round to filleting my fish.

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Plus needed to cook prawns. Recipe called for crayfish. Not a lot of crayfish in the fishmonger's yesterday.

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Served with a citrus berre blanc, prawn bisque and very good garlic potato puree, although it was a bit stiff to be pretty.

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Meat course. Boeuf Borguignon and a half bottle of Ch. Neuf de Pape that's been languishing in my climate controlled cellar.

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And to end. A mess. A colapsed, melted muscavado and star anise parfait, with parkin jus (should be puree), clementine jelly, orange cream and croquant.

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Good night.

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You write wonderfully, and you have shared lots of food that is new to me and that looks and sounds delicious. I hope Mrs. Sheepish and co. enjoyed the meal.

Thank you for sharing your week with use, and kudos on an outstanding week (not that I am in any hurry for it to end)!

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How do you make gruyere crisps? The look awesome. Excellent blog. Beautiful table... Food is restaurant worthy. Tell us more!

Grated gruyere blended with egg white. Blend. Smear on silicon sheet. Cook at 150C for 15 mins. Cut to shape. Cook for another 15 mins. The filling is a mouse made with cream and gelatin plus cherve blanc. What really made this was the lemon jam. Lemons and sugar simmered for hours. When I tried the jam on its own I though it was going to be too bitter. It's supposed to be made with Meyer lemons and I just had regular supermarket lemons, and I wondered if Meyer skins are less bitter. But just a little blob with the cheese was lovely. It's in the Eleven Madison Park book so I suspect I better not give exact details.

Edited by sheepish (log)
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Excellent special-occasion tour de force to finish up (which I shouldn't mention but join in saying "encore" instead). Can I ask for a tour of the sunchoke plate, please ?

This is pretty much as per Eleven Madison Park. One omission.

'Chokes roasted whole, wrapped in foil with butter, salt and thyme. These are cooled, then finished in hot butter using the butter they cooked in plus a couple of garlic cloves. The watercress sprigs are also wilted in this.

'Chokes sliced lengthways and poached in chicken stock and thyme. These are then topped with a lemon brioche crust which is brioche bread crumbs, lemon zest and butter. Those are finished under a hot grill.

There's a smear of 'choke puree - just 'chokes, potato, butter and cream.

Also pickled 'chokes - finely sliced and pickled in white balsamic, sugar and salt. Pickled yellow mustard seeds. And 'choke crisps - thin slices fried in hot oil.

Watercress 'jus'. This is watercress blended with ice and water and strained so you just keep the water. A little xantham gum added. You're supposed to emulsify lemon oil into this, but I hadn't made that, so I blended in rapeseed oil and squeezed in a little lemon juice.

Edited by sheepish (log)
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How do you make gruyere crisps? The look awesome. Excellent blog. Beautiful table... Food is restaurant worthy. Tell us more!

Grated gruyere blended with egg white. Blend. Smear on silicon sheet. Cook at 150C for 15 mins. Cut to shape. Cook for another 15 mins. The filling is a mouse made with cream and gelatin plus cherve blanc. What really made this was the lemon jam. Lemons and sugar simmered for hours. When I tried the jam on its own I though it was going to be too bitter. It's supposed to be made with Meyer lemons and I just had regular supermarket lemons, and I wondered if Meyer skins are less bitter. But just a little blob with the cheese was lovely. It's in the Eleven Madison Park book so I suspect I better not give exact details.

Thanks, found the recipe in EMP. Thank God Harri Teeter grocery store is open 24 hours. One never knows when gruyere emergency may occur.

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... Cockles come picked and cooked. I've never seen them still in the shell. Quite common to see someone of advanced years asking for a small pot and the fishmonger has the vinegar so they can be enjoyed on the spot.

Hope you're not talking about me there young fella. The last time I ate cockles straight from the pot was on my way home from the pub - years before you were even born. Going to Tesco for them on my way home now somehow doesn't have the same attraction!

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Wonderful blog - such a contrast to urban offerings!

Enjoying your sense of humour in details, AND Mutt On's comments.

Thanks Dejah, Vous êtes trop aimable (see what I did there whilst keeping well away from any references to the Princess of Mars?) Must be something to do with the genes ..... not that I could fit into Sheepish's jeans - too small round the waist and too long in the leg ...... I'm just long in the tooth!

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Lovely blog - I have very much enjoyed your sense of humour, the writing and the food.

Made the Teisen lap yesterday, big hit at home and at work today. Thank Mrs Sheepish for showing us that.

Welcome mutt on - hope you continue to post here on eG.

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Happy Birthday, Mrs. Sheepish :smile:

There is so much more in you to share, sheepish. I hope to see more of your offerings in various egullet threads.

Thanks for a great blog! :smile:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Hello all! Mrs Sheepish here,

Thank you very much for all your kind birthday wishes.

Kerry, I'm glad your teisen lap was good, I was pleasantly surprised by how light it was. I'll definitely be making it again.

I think Sheepish will be uploading some images soon!

x

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Right. Last blog pictures. Sunday. I have cooked nothing today. I've eaten quite a bit.

Breakfast. Pancakes. Mrs S cooks 'em up in a kitchen not quite fully restored from yesterday's culinary explosion.

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Served with maple syrup and seasonal (last September) berries. I had butter with mine too.

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Look at the contented smiles.

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It's Mrs S's birthday today. I just prefer to cook a special dinner on a Saturday night. So I indulged her by staying out of her way, watching Wales beat Scotland in the rugby, while she prepared roast pork. Can't get much more British than a Sunday roast. The rather splendid apron was a birthday present from her sister.

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This is my spice grinder. I have an attachment for my expensive Waring food processor that grinds spices. I think I've used it twice. This gets used nearly every day.

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Pork rubbed with fennel seeds, salt and black pepper ready for the oven. At this stage the house had tilted sideways. I've no idea why the picture is like this and I've resized more photos this week than the rest of my life in total and you're not going to get a 90 degree rotate out of me too.

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And the final photo of this blog. Roast pork. Roast potatoes. Roast carrots. Green beens. And a slosh of gravy. A satisfying end to the week.

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Hope you've enjoyed it. Thank you for all the comments and questions. Thank you to my family for joining eGullet and making me look artificially popular. I will get that parfait right soon and post the evidence!

Edited by sheepish (log)
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