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David Ross

Top Chef: Texas

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He's getting a razzing on his facebook page. He's made one comment in reply. We don't comprehend the reality TV interview process, and Top Chef has dull cleavers and hacksaws.


Edited by Dignan (log)

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A tool and his tools are soon making excuses...


"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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I liked that the two groups had different challenges. At least it keeps things interesting.

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I enjoyed the seemingly more realistic way they kicked contestants off. Can't cut (or identify) a loin? Pack your knives. Sloppy plating? Pack your knives. The remaining chefs appear talented, and I'm looking forward to the rest of the season.

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While the aforementioned James Bond Pig Butcher was incredibly rude and full of himself, what about the poor sap that splashed the soup on the plate--and still served it to the judges! Wow, you don't even have the sense to ladle the soup from the pot into the bowls, clean the bowls, then place them on the serving plates? That wouldn't have taken more than a few seconds and at least he would've given the judges the chance to taste his soup. Go. Go back to whence you came from my poor lad.

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Part of me is disappointed that we didn't get to see the celebrity chef power tool get smacked down a few times.

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While the aforementioned James Bond Pig Butcher was incredibly rude and full of himself, what about the poor sap that splashed the soup on the plate--and still served it to the judges! Wow, you don't even have the sense to ladle the soup from the pot into the bowls, clean the bowls, then place them on the serving plates? That wouldn't have taken more than a few seconds and at least he would've given the judges the chance to taste his soup. Go. Go back to whence you came from my poor lad.

He ran out of time. The only reason he got any soup on the plate/in the cups was because he threw it at them as time expired. He had no time to lalde, clean, etc. Certainly he should have managed time better but that bit several of the contestants.

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While the aforementioned James Bond Pig Butcher was incredibly rude and full of himself, what about the poor sap that splashed the soup on the plate--and still served it to the judges! Wow, you don't even have the sense to ladle the soup from the pot into the bowls, clean the bowls, then place them on the serving plates? That wouldn't have taken more than a few seconds and at least he would've given the judges the chance to taste his soup. Go. Go back to whence you came from my poor lad.

He ran out of time. The only reason he got any soup on the plate/in the cups was because he threw it at them as time expired. He had no time to lalde, clean, etc. Certainly he should have managed time better but that bit several of the contestants.

And that's exactly my point. These people should absolutely go into this competition knowing that time management is critical. It's not an excuse to say you ran out of time. It's expected that you'll present your dish given the amount of time you have. If you can't handle that, then don't send in an audition tape.

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Sure, but established cheftestants often run into time problems in late episodes after participating all season, usually manifested in undercooked food. Chef Lee's rabbit was underdone, and the one girl didn't get hers on the plate. It's certainly not an excuse, but it happens and is highlights the challenge of the challenge more than being a sign of chefly incompetence.

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While the aforementioned James Bond Pig Butcher was incredibly rude and full of himself, what about the poor sap that splashed the soup on the plate--and still served it to the judges! Wow, you don't even have the sense to ladle the soup from the pot into the bowls, clean the bowls, then place them on the serving plates? That wouldn't have taken more than a few seconds and at least he would've given the judges the chance to taste his soup. Go. Go back to whence you came from my poor lad.

He ran out of time. The only reason he got any soup on the plate/in the cups was because he threw it at them as time expired. He had no time to lalde, clean, etc. Certainly he should have managed time better but that bit several of the contestants.

And that's exactly my point. These people should absolutely go into this competition knowing that time management is critical. It's not an excuse to say you ran out of time. It's expected that you'll present your dish given the amount of time you have. If you can't handle that, then don't send in an audition tape.

I'm willing to cut the guy some slack. After all, it was the first show and no one realistically cooks with a clock counting down the seconds.

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While the aforementioned James Bond Pig Butcher was incredibly rude and full of himself, what about the poor sap that splashed the soup on the plate--and still served it to the judges! Wow, you don't even have the sense to ladle the soup from the pot into the bowls, clean the bowls, then place them on the serving plates? That wouldn't have taken more than a few seconds and at least he would've given the judges the chance to taste his soup. Go. Go back to whence you came from my poor lad.

He ran out of time. The only reason he got any soup on the plate/in the cups was because he threw it at them as time expired. He had no time to lalde, clean, etc. Certainly he should have managed time better but that bit several of the contestants.

And that's exactly my point. These people should absolutely go into this competition knowing that time management is critical. It's not an excuse to say you ran out of time. It's expected that you'll present your dish given the amount of time you have. If you can't handle that, then don't send in an audition tape.

I'm willing to cut the guy some slack. After all, it was the first show and no one realistically cooks with a clock counting down the seconds.

I guess I'll just be the odd one out on this part of our discussion. The time constraints they face on Top Chef are exactly the challenge they face everyday in a restaurant kitchen. If you're cooking for paying customers in the real world, the clock is always ticking down by the second. Don't for a moment think that anyone cooking in a Robuchon kitchen isn't aware of precisely the second the sauce goes over the fish to when the plates go out of the kitchen and the exact moment they must be placed in front of the customer.

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I'm with you, Dave. I watch Chopped pretty regularly and there are many contestants who state in their talking heads that they have practiced with a clock ticking before they went on the show. The chefs of Top Chef aren't being handed a mystery basket and told to transform Jordan almonds into an entree after all.

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Takes ordinary people years to achieve A@# hole-ness, it/he/she, did it at the tender age of 22!

Well, he *IS* the guy who was able to write his own cookbook in just 3-1/2 weeks, you know. He obviously does everything faster.

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Takes ordinary people years to achieve A@# hole-ness, it/he/she, did it at the tender age of 22!

Well, he *IS* the guy who was able to write his own cookbook in just 3-1/2 weeks, you know. He obviously does everything faster.

As soon as he opened his mouth, you just KNEW he was going home... it was a relief that they didn't make him cook! I felt so sorry for the girl he screwed over by mangling her pork, but that'll teach her not to rely on totally untried chefs to do anything for her!

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I've actually eaten at Colin's restaurant (that was in 2007 or 08). Let's just say that time management does not really a big part in his life. When you enter the doors, you are in his zone. Though he has a lot going on and seems to be pulling it off far better than I would have anticipated. I also guessed he wouldn't survive challenge one, but not for a poor presentation.

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Back to the timing issue and how the time frame of a challenge translates into the real world. Last night I was watching "Chef Hunter" on Food Network. The episode followed Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger and the staff of Border Grill in Los Angeles as they searched for a new Executive Chef. They had two candidates and both had to "audition" by cooking a dinner service in the restaurant kitchen. One poor fellow got terribly stuck in the weeds at the peak of the dinner service. With Chef Milliken and Feniger looking on, the Manager kept calling out "where's my appetizers, I need those appetizers." "The orders came in 20 minutes ago, appetizers have to go out in 8 minutes. I need appetizers, table 8."

Obviously Border Grill has precise procedures and strick timing guidlines for when orders come in and have to go out, which tells me that if a Cheftestant doesn't watch the seconds ticking on the Top Chef clock, they won't be minding the clock in the restaurant kitchen. That's if they can get a job after failing the timing challenges on Top Chef.

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David - I saw that and was confused as to the timing issue. It seemed that he was 20 minutes behind on prep or something. The woman who was yelling the times as you noted seemed really upset but I wondered what had been conveyed to the chef.

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Back to the timing issue and how the time frame of a challenge translates into the real world. Last night I was watching "Chef Hunter" on Food Network. The episode followed Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger and the staff of Border Grill in Los Angeles as they searched for a new Executive Chef. They had two candidates and both had to "audition" by cooking a dinner service in the restaurant kitchen. One poor fellow got terribly stuck in the weeds at the peak of the dinner service. With Chef Milliken and Feniger looking on, the Manager kept calling out "where's my appetizers, I need those appetizers." "The orders came in 20 minutes ago, appetizers have to go out in 8 minutes. I need appetizers, table 8."

It's too bad. I thought his food looked a lot better and a lot more interesting than the one who got the job.


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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David - I saw that and was confused as to the timing issue. It seemed that he was 20 minutes behind on prep or something. The woman who was yelling the times as you noted seemed really upset but I wondered what had been conveyed to the chef.

The tickets were already rolling in. He also got in the weeds on his entrees, which needed to be out in the 12-minute range from time of ordering. Like some the contestants on Top Chef, he appeared to be really creative and had some dishes that sounded delicious, but when it came to his organizational skills and staying on top of his timing, he really fell off the cliff.

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Rattlesnake would be more a Washington DC sort of dish.

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So it appears someone over at Bravo has been watching too much Survivor.

Redemption Island? Seriously, WTF?

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Seems like Top Chef is using almost the same set as Chopped for their "walk of shame."

Wishing I were set designer. I'd send the losing chef into the kitchen, past the dish machine and pot washing sinks, through the service door, out into a back alley lined with overflowing dumpsters and barrels for used fryer oil, and onto a traffic jammed Manhattan crosstown street.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

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