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Chris Amirault

Pressure Cookers: 2011 and beyond

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What size is the gasket? A lot of asian appliance places sell various sized silicone gaskets and you could probably find one for just about any size.

The diameter is 10". But I'd be a bit afraid to use a non-standard part in a pressure cooker. Is this a realistic fear?

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What size is the gasket? A lot of asian appliance places sell various sized silicone gaskets and you could probably find one for just about any size.

The diameter is 10". But I'd be a bit afraid to use a non-standard part in a pressure cooker. Is this a realistic fear?

If the size is right it should be OK.

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worse that could happen at first re-trial it would leak, and you just take it off the heat and let it cool. just so the gasket does not obstruct the pressure relief valve

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The preferred pressure cooker from Cooks Illustrated is the Fissler 8 1/2 Qt. Vitaquick, Model 600 700 08 079. The Kuhn Rikon Duramax 8 1/2 Qt that I've been wanting is in the Recommended with reservations box.

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I noticed today that Cook's Illustrated rated Fissler their favorite, and the only tested model to reach the US standard of 15 PSI. I am not sure exactly which Fissler. From the picture I think perhaps the Vitaquick 8.5 quart.

Since I just purchased an ice cream maker I am not likely to be replacing my broken Cuisinart pressure cooker any time soon. I was quite happy with the Cuisinart but they don't make replacement gaskets. Something to keep in mind when shopping for a pressure cooker.

Another reason I like the All American pressure canner/cookers. No gasket.


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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I was quite happy with the Cuisinart but they don't make replacement gaskets. Something to keep in mind when shopping for a pressure cooker.

Cuisinart replacement gasket...

http://www.cuisinart...es/cpc-600.html

Ciao,

L


Edited by pazzaglia (log)

hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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I was quite happy with the Cuisinart but they don't make replacement gaskets. Something to keep in mind when shopping for a pressure cooker.

Cuisinart replacement gasket...

http://www.cuisinart...es/cpc-600.html

Ciao,

L

Sadly those parts are all for the Cuisinart electric models, not for the stovetop ones like my C86-24. Thanks for trying however.

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Another reason I like the All American pressure canner/cookers. No gasket.

How do they make their seal?

It's a smoothly-machined metal-to-metal contact, which you lubricate with petroleum jelly. You don't have to lubricate every time you use the contraption, which is nice. You do have to make sure that you don't ding the sealing surfaces, but you don't want to drop the lid, anyway, so as not to damage the pressure gauge.


Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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Question for the PC experts.

A couple of times, especially when making stocks and the cooker is particularly full, when i've done the cold water quick release i get a loud rumbling sound from the inside and liquid spewing out of the cooker at the gasket. As though the liquid inside started vigorously boiling.

Anyone experience this before? It's an 8 quart Fagor duo.

Hmmm. i wonder if the cold water is causing the metal to contract, breaking the seal at the lid causing rapid depressurizing and liquid boiling and expanding... That acutally sort of makes sense-ish.


Edited by jmolinari (log)

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A couple of times, especially when making stocks and the cooker is particularly full, when i've done the cold water quick release i get a loud rumbling sound from the inside and liquid spewing out of the cooker at the gasket. As though the liquid inside started vigorously boiling.

Anyone experience this before?

I have had that happen with my Fagor. Don't know why though.

You are right, the liquids are boiling VERY vigorously. In pressure cooking "boiling" as we know it is separated into two parts that work independently.

When something boils normally, the liquid has reached its maximum temperature and bubbles boil to the surface.

In pressure cooking, when the liquid has reached the maximum temperature the pressure STOPS the bubbles from breaking the surface - this is why pressure cooker stocks are so incredibly clear (no actual movement during cooking). Bubbles break to the surface only when the pressure cooker is reaching or loosing pressure. The faster it looses pressure the more violent the boil.

You can "see" this yourself by laying your hand on the handle of the pressure cooker and feel the vibrations inside while it's reaching pressure - and no vibrations while it's maintaining pressure.

All that being said, I don't recommend a cold-water quick release, or even normal release for stocks. To acheive the most clarity (by moving the ingredients the least amount possible) and flavor (by condensing the vapor in the cooker) natural release is best.

Ciao,

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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A couple of times, especially when making stocks and the cooker is particularly full, when i've done the cold water quick release i get a loud rumbling sound from the inside and liquid spewing out of the cooker at the gasket. As though the liquid inside started vigorously boiling.

Anyone experience this before?

I have had that happen with my Fagor. Don't know why though.

You are right, the liquids are boiling VERY vigorously. In pressure cooking "boiling" as we know it is separated into two parts that work independently.

When something boils normally, the liquid has reached its maximum temperature and bubbles boil to the surface.

In pressure cooking, when the liquid has reached the maximum temperature the pressure STOPS the bubbles from breaking the surface - this is why pressure cooker stocks are so incredibly clear (no actual movement during cooking). Bubbles break to the surface only when the pressure cooker is reaching or loosing pressure. The faster it looses pressure the more violent the boil.

You can "see" this yourself by laying your hand on the handle of the pressure cooker and feel the vibrations inside while it's reaching pressure - and no vibrations while it's maintaining pressure.

All that being said, I don't recommend a cold-water quick release, or even normal release for stocks. To acheive the most clarity (by moving the ingredients the least amount possible) and flavor (by condensing the vapor in the cooker) natural release is best.

Ciao,

L

Thanks Pazzaglia...the question is WHY is this occurring during the cold release. I wonder if my seal is being lost because of metal contraction....that's the only reason i can think of.

Theoretically with the cold water release the vapor is condensed in the cooker. I don't care about clarity:)

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Is it possible that the liquid in the PC is still at a temperature higher than the boiling point of water when the pressure drops to normal and the pressure release opens so it explodes a little? I picture that the pressure drop is caused by the air trapped inside the pc contracting but there is still a lot of thermal mass inside the PC. I may be completely making that up but it makes sense to me.

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Is it possible that the liquid in the PC is still at a temperature higher than the boiling point of water when the pressure drops to normal and the pressure release opens so it explodes a little? I picture that the pressure drop is caused by the air trapped inside the pc contracting but there is still a lot of thermal mass inside the PC. I may be completely making that up but it makes sense to me.

I dont think that could happen. The condensed vapor would be replaced near instantly by the water that is still above boiling point. The pressure released would reseal almost instantly as well.

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Thanks Pazzaglia...the question is WHY is this occurring during the cold release. I wonder if my seal is being lost because of metal contraction....that's the only reason i can think of.

Theoretically with the cold water release the vapor is condensed in the cooker. I don't care about clarity:)

I think you are cooling the lid and head-space in the pressure cooker quickly enough to release the pressure but the liquid inside is still hotter than 100 C so it starts to boil rapidly. I have had food boil for at least 30 seconds when opening the PC after a quick release.

I agree that a natural release is best for stock. You can factor the time sitting under pressure while cooling into the cooking time so it doesn't take much longer and saves energy.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I just got around to testing my replacement cooker today. It seems better than the first and I'm probably being over vigilante, but at pressure there is a very subtle hiss and occasionally vapor is visible on the steam guard. According to Kuhn, this is normal operation.

Below are two pictures, showing the pressure settings I used when testing for any hiss - it was present in both. Also linked is an out of focus video, but you can hear the hiss in it and see the wisp of vapor I am talking about (around 4-5 seconds on). I am under the impression that the first photo is the proper setting for pressure, but I tried both.

So am I being crazy or is this normal?

Did you ever confirm if this is normal? My new Kuhn Rikon is doing the same thing. Fairly consistent low hissing at any pressure. Not quite enough that I would think it's broken for sure but it's not silent either.

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Did you ever confirm if this is normal? My new Kuhn Rikon is doing the same thing. Fairly consistent low hissing at any pressure. Not quite enough that I would think it's broken for sure but it's not silent either.

Yes, a light hissing sound is completely normal.

However, sometimes, the safety valve might be out of place (or need replacement). So run the cooker without the pretty piece of stainless steel that covers the valves, and check to see if you see any bubbling or vapor escaping around the little round the plug that is offset from the primary safet valve.

IMG_8331.JPG

If you do see any bubbling or vapor around the secondary safety plug, it may need to be cleaned. Eventually, this plug will need to be replaced - mine lasted a year but it gets pretty heavy usage (several times a day).

Here is the replacement (in the photo it's upside-down from the way it would ordinarily be put in the lid): http://amzn.to/V2tBF4

Ciao,

L


Edited by pazzaglia (log)

hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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Did you ever confirm if this is normal? My new Kuhn Rikon is doing the same thing. Fairly consistent low hissing at any pressure. Not quite enough that I would think it's broken for sure but it's not silent either.

Yes, a light hissing sound is completely normal.

However, sometimes, the safety valve might be out of place (or need replacement). So run the cooker without the pretty piece of stainless steel that covers the valves, and check to see if you see any bubbling or vapor escaping around the little round the plug that is offset from the primary safet valve.

If you do see any bubbling or vapor around the secondary safety plug, it may need to be cleaned. Eventually, this plug will need to be replaced - mine lasted a year but it gets pretty heavy usage (several times a day).

Here is the replacement (in the photo it's upside-down from the way it would ordinarily be put in the lid): http://amzn.to/V2tBF4

Ciao,

L

Thank you. I'm pretty sure it's coming from the indicator rod as I can stop or change the hissing by twisting or pushing/pulling on it but I will check the safety as well.

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So what's the new Kuhn Rikon Duromatic Alcea?

It just looks like a fancier lid but the words "two level steaming action" are used and we all know two of something you don't necessarily need must be better, than one thing you don't need.

Advice from Psi-sters please?


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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So what's the new Kuhn Rikon Duromatic Alcea?

It just looks like a fancier lid but the words "two level steaming action" are used and we all know two of something you don't necessarily need must be better, than one thing you don't need.

Advice from Psi-sters please?

It seems from the instruction manual (http://www.kuhnrikon...a_GA_en_esp.pdf) that the Kuhn Rikon Alcea has two pressure RELEASES. One is "slow" which is equivalent of pushing the pressure signal down to release pressure in the classic model, and the other is "fast" which is the equivalent of pulling up the pressure signal in the classic model. The nice thing about the Alcea is that, like Top, you can just flip a switch and walk away. No need to stand there and hold the signal during the whole pressure release operation (one of the very few dings I gave Kuhn in my review of the classic Duromatic).

The handle also appears to be significantly updated from previous models to include a correct placement signal - but this only detects if the lid is closed properly, it does not actually lock it --the pressure from gasket while the contents are at pressure do that.

Ciao,

L


Edited by pazzaglia (log)

hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!

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Robert Jueneman, After reading your initial impressions of the Fissler pressure cooker and seeing that cooks illustrated gave it their top score could you let us know what you think after living with it for a little while? That has replaced the Kuhn Rikon on my dream list and I would love to know how it is performing.

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Here is the Cook's Illustrated article (1 Jan 2013) online:

http://www.cooksillu...asp?docid=41600

(Alas, a 14 day trial required to see the results.)

They prefer the Fissler Vitaquick 8 1/2 Quart over the Kuhn Rikon Duromatic 8 1/2 Quart, for the Fissler's "low, wide profile" (browns, rather than scorches) and its ability to reach 250 F, and to hold temperature without constant adjustment. I'm sold. The Fagor Duo 8-Quart is their value choice.

While I find their "we figured out what several centuries of brilliant chefs missed!" recipe zingers juvenile, their other equipment reviews seem worth reading. They got Shun kitchen shears right. Complaining about milky Cambros because they bought the ghetto versions that can't take heat? They make errors of omission.


Edited by Syzygies (log)

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

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I got my 6-quart Presto old-fashioned gravity weight cooker for Christmas and have used it three times. Results were stunning each time:

- chickpeas for chole - the creamiest and tastiest I've ever had, I ate handfuls out of the cooker, no salt

- beef stock for beef stroganoff - the hourlong Blumenthal method - perfect

- chicken stock same method, for soup tomorrow, but I could basically just drink the soup

Incredibly easy to use, well made and priced right.

I'm a convert. Curious about Dominican chicken stew, and the possibilities for ragu bolognese..... probably need to move these thoughts to the cooking forum.

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