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Cold Cereal -- as dessert


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My kids are just like me. We'd rather have leftover curry, enchiladas, etc. for breakfast. Something savory, preferably spicy.

Cold cereal (the stuff in the boxes) is advertised as breakfast food. We prefer it late at night, instead of dessert (brownies, pie, cake, etc.). Should it be topped with ice cream instead of milk, that's just fine. We, unless it's a chocolate variety like Coco Puffs, prefer an unsweetened cereal, with no added sugar. Perhaps some dried fruit, but again, sugar need not apply.

Are we alone in that 10:00 pm cereal craving?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I haven't done it in many years but, when I was a kid, I used to like cornflakes with milk and a scoop of ice cream as a dessert or snack.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Captain Crunch...8 pm

I even just got some new big bowl last week, they may be too big we are out of cereal

T

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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When I was a kid, the only time we got sugary cereal was if we got a box to eat with milk for dessert. My favorite, now and then: corn pops.

MelissaH

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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I have always loved cereal. Growing up, we never had sweetened cereals in the house. So today, my favorites are Wheaties, Total, Grape-Nuts and Wheat Chex. We ate it for breakfast and also snacks. A favorite dessert was vanilla ice cream topped with Grape-Nuts. Add some fresh strawberries and I was in heaven. Might have to have that soon.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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Growing up, we never had sweetened cereals in the house.

We were a fairly large family with not a lot of money. We very rarely had cold cereal of any type in the house. Breakfast was usually oatmeal, rice or cream of wheat. When we did have cereal it was usually those huge pillowcase size bags of almost-name-brand unsweetened cereals like the generic corn flakes or puffed wheat. I think the cereal dessert thing came from pure greed. There was actually cereal in the house but there was also ice cream... how can I have both? :biggrin:

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Growing up, we never had sweetened cereals in the house.

We were a fairly large family with not a lot of money. We very rarely had cold cereal of any type in the house. Breakfast was usually oatmeal, rice or cream of wheat. When we did have cereal it was usually those huge pillowcase size bags of almost-name-brand unsweetened cereals like the generic corn flakes or puffed wheat. I think the cereal dessert thing came from pure greed. There was actually cereal in the house but there was also ice cream... how can I have both? :biggrin:

Obviously you have never tried topping plain vanilla ice cream with Post Toasties. One of my faves! :rolleyes:

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I am not much of a breakfast eater at all, but when I do - it must be hot. Cereal has always been a bedtime snack for me. I love all sorts, but my favorites are the very sweet ones - Frosted Flakes, Lucky Charms, etc. - with extra drifts of sugar on them and just the BAREST dampening of milk. Otherwise, you might taste plain milk :blink::raz: !

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At the formerly legendary Michel Richard Citronelle they used to offer Co Co Puffs with an extra dusting of serious badass cocoa and cream flavored with bergamot.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I just laughed :laugh: reading this topic, especially about the Bailey's on cereal.

I love to melt some dark chocolate, add a little Grand Marnier or Chambord, dump some homemade granola into it and then just eat it with a spoon, hot or cold. An after supper dessert. DH thinks I'm crazy.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I am firmly in the cereal camp, all kinds of cereal. I like making rice crispy treats, but with different kinds of cereal.

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Huh. And here I thought my husband was the only grown man on the planet to love a big bowl of cereal for dessert. Although til now I've been embarrassed to admit we've been enjoying jello (artifically-sweetened) for dessert these days, after years of ice cream and the occasional box of vanilla wafers. What's next, Kool Aid? :biggrin:

Edited by devlin (log)
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I am firmly in the cereal camp, all kinds of cereal. I like making rice crispy treats, but with different kinds of cereal.

If you make your Treats in a plastic bowl in the microwave you only need enough butter to melt and swirl up the sides...maybe a tablespoon. I cant eat them with the full amount of butter anymore...oh and practically no clean up

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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After Mom went to bed sometimes, Dad and I would have a bowl of Kellogg's Corn Flakes and split the banana that went on top of it.

About a year ago, the subject of my father came up at a holiday (he passed away some time ago) and my son "confessed" that he and Daddy would split a banana over corn flakes after every one else was in bed sometimes.

It did feel awfully naughty. :biggrin:

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After Mom went to bed sometimes, Dad and I would have a bowl of Kellogg's Corn Flakes and split the banana that went on top of it.

About a year ago, the subject of my father came up at a holiday (he passed away some time ago) and my son "confessed" that he and Daddy would split a banana over corn flakes after every one else was in bed sometimes.

It did feel awfully naughty. :biggrin:

That's a lovely memory. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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