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Wheat Germ : What is it good for?


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I'm cleaning out the fridge, trying to use up some spare ingredients: I came across, way in the back, an unopened jar of wheat germ. I can't recall what I thought I would ever use it for, though I suppose it must have been a bread recipe. Anyone have any good thoughts on how to use up a whole lot of it all at once?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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The Cook's Illustrated recipe for Bran Muffins uses it. That's what I have it for. Here's the recipe.

* Exported from MasterCook Mac *

Cook's Bran Muffins

Recipe By : The Cook's Bible

Serving Size : 18 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Muffins

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/4 cup melted butter

1/2 cup oil

1/4 cup molasses and honey

3/4 cup brown sugar

1 tsp vanilla

3 eggs

2 cups buttermilk

1 cup wheat germ

1 1/4 cups bran

1 1/2 cups raisins -- soaked and drained

2 3/4 cups flour

3 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp kosher salt

Mix together melted butter, oil, molasses, honey, brown sugar, vanilla, eggs and buttermilk. Add wheat germ and bran. Fold in flour mixed with leavenings and salt. Let sit for at least one hour or overnight. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

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That must be based on the 1993 recipe? Or the maybe the 1998? The 2007 recipe doesn't use the wheat bran. Do you toast it before using it in this one? I never realized CI had so many different bran muffin recipes!

Not toasted. It's a great recipe, not exactly low fat, but very moist muffins.

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First of all, thank you for a topic title and description that one can actually sing instead of just read.

And secondly, I'm not sure why it has to be in the fridge but I'm sure you're wise to do so - it says to on the label. I figure it's like soy sauce and all-peanut peanut butter, eat it all in a week or two to avoid refrigeration.

I'd never bought wheat germ until I had babies - it's considered a superfood for the new to solids crowd. Beyond that, it's good in burgers like bread crumbs are and maybe in the morning porridge.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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And secondly, I'm not sure why it has to be in the fridge but I'm sure you're wise to do so - it says to on the label. I figure it's like soy sauce and all-peanut peanut butter, eat it all in a week or two to avoid refrigeration.

It's actually in the fridge because I was out of room in the freezer, where I typically keep high-oil-content stuff that I don't use very often. If you leave it out at room temp it goes rancid much, much faster. At least, I assume that is true of wheat germ: I know it is true of whole wheat flour, which is what I was basing that on.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Usually the bottles have a "best by" date on them. I use wheat germ for a couple of bread recipes and always ended up throwing some out so I started sprinkling a couple of spoonsfull on my cereal every morning, and now I never have to throw any out.

"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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When I make whole wheat yeasted bread in a pan, I use it. After the final shaping, I roll the loaf in a jelly roll pan covered with wheat germ. Then put the loaf in the oiled pan. When it is finished baking, it has a crust with texture and taste.

I have also used it to the same purpose with quick breads that have nuts and fruit in them. I butter the mold, then use wheat germ to coat the mold, as you would use crumbs or flour.

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Nothing substantive to add, but this thread did remind me of something that made me smile... When I was a kid, my grandfather (in his 80's at the time) had heard that wheat germ was good for him. So he carried a little jar of it with him to restaurants where he proceeded to sprinkle it on... Wait for it...

French fries and steak!!! :-)

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Hmmm...somewhere I have a cookie recipe with coconut and wheat germ and I don't remember what else. Good cookies though. I'll have to go dig that up. Me, I just eat it just like a bowl of cereal with a little sugar and milk.

edited to add link

http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Grandma...at-Germ-Cookies

There are tons of cookie recipes if you google. This one sounds faily close to mine only mine was all oil so I'm guessing they're trying to take the same recipe and bring it up to date by cutting the fat down a bit. Not a bad idea.

Edited by duckduck (log)

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Well, frozen yogurt, honey and wheat germ is probably my favorite dessert of all time. Try that?

Similar, but make mine good plain yogurt (not frozen) and add halved grapes.

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1C fresh sugared sliced strawberries ,juice too

1/4-1/2 cup of wheat germ

1c heavy cream

In a bowl add a cup of coffee and you have my favorite before bed snack when I was 24 or 25. And then my cholesterol was 120. 30+ years later, I'd be afraid to share the room with that snack.

Robert

Seattle

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I'm a big fan of plain or vanilla yogurt, and wheat germ. Add some honey or strawberries, and it's dessert. It's a fantastic breakfast, adds a lovely delicate crunch. I also like it on oatmeal, and other hot cereals. Adds a nice textural contrast, and nutty flavor.

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Adding to the chorus of voices: it's pretty good in yogurt. And I use it to bread cutlets of all sorts in a 2:1:1 mix of flour to crumbs to wheat germ.

Or you could invent a cocktail that you inflict on your friends. Something like tequila with wheat germ.

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A friend of mine used to put toasted wheat germ in his scrambled eggs. It sounded weird, but actually tasted good.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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