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formerly grueldelux

Press Pot/French Press Coffee

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Weinoo, my guess is that you like strong coffee (which we lovingly call rocket fuel). In my drip machine I'm also at about 1 T for 8 oz.

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Weinoo, my guess is that you like strong coffee (which we lovingly call rocket fuel). In my drip machine I'm also at about 1 T for 8 oz.

 

I don't really know what is meant by strong coffee.  I like coffee brewed properly, with freshly roasted beans, freshly ground, made with good water at the proper temperature.  No matter the method.

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I use approximately 2 T per 8 oz. water. 2 T should weigh around 14 grams...7 grams per T of coffee.

 

Yep, me too. Or in my case, 21g per 12 oz. 7g per 4 oz water.

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I just made my first experimental pot. 3 Tbl grounds, approx 23 oz water, steeped for 5 minutes. What was strange to me is that the plunger had a lot of resistance for about the first 1/3 of the way down and then suddenly got easier.

Try what I said about lifting the plunger up when you meet resistance, it works.

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Coarse grind. 37 grams coffee to 24 ounces water (adjust to your taste). Five to ten seconds after my electric water kettle auto shuts, it's at about 205F (195-210 is recommended temp). Pour and stir to set grounds. I like a 6 minute, 30 second brew time ; your mileage may vary.

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May be I am the only one.

 

French press with ground coffee and water.

 

Microwave.

 

press and enjoy.

 

dcarch

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May be I am the only one.

 

French press with ground coffee and water.

 

Microwave.

 

press and enjoy.

 

dcarch

 

You remove the glass container..?

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You remove the glass container..?

 

I remove the metal press, just use the glass container, which holds one cup of coffee. It takes 1 1/2 minutes in my (900w ?) microwave.

 

dcarch

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Use whatever coffee you like. I enjoy good old mocha java .

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12 hours ago, maurice_dudeley said:


I'm using unbleached filters for my coffee. Is it true that it can affect the taste of your coffee?
http://www.houseofbaristas.com/best-espresso-grinder/
Thanks! 

A press pot/French press doesn't use a filter. 

 

When I used to use a filter, I never noticed a big difference in taste in regular and unbleached. But I vastly prefer the press pot method now.

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Posted (edited)

Last year I did a ton of experiments and arrived at 80g coffee per 1400g water (48 fl oz, a big press pot). This is 5.7% by weight relative to the water. I'm mostly buying East African coffees, especially Ethiopian varieties, from 3rd wave roasters who favor a lighter roast. Occasionally I'll end up with  beans that do better with 90g or 70g, but this is rare.

 

The variable that took me forever to figure out was water temperature. About 8 years ago in this thread I was complaining that the coffee I made at my girlfriend's apartment, with a crappy grinder and no scale, was often better than what I made at home while geeking out. The culprit turned out to be my (supposedly fancy) Zojirushi hot water pot, which was set to 203°F. Turns out that it was about 10 degrees cooler than that, and this was throwing off everything. 

 

I use a regular electric kettle now and check the temperature. After trying every temperature in the recommended range, I found 93°C / 199°F to be my favorite. My press pot is uninsulated, so this would be the starting temperature. I've never measured to see how much it drops over 4 minutes.


Edited by paulraphael (log)

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On 3/3/2018 at 8:32 AM, weinoo said:

@paulraphael  You really need to try a subscription to Tim Wendelboe.

 

Yikes, that's gotta be expensive. I'm sure it's great, but it seems excessive paying shipping and also Norwegian prices. You like them so much more than the stuff roasted at your doorstep?

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6 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

Yikes, that's gotta be expensive. I'm sure it's great, but it seems excessive paying shipping and also Norwegian prices. You like them so much more than the stuff roasted at your doorstep?

You'd be surprised at the pricing.  I don't want to say that it's less than I pay at places like Gimme or Grumpy, but my 3 bags/month subscription, for 6 months, at the current exchange rate, comes out to under $16.50 a 250 gram bag...not crazily expensive, in my book, for this stuff.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

That's $30/ lb.  I pay roughly $20/lb for Stumptown or Toby's Estate. And that seems like a pretty crazy price to me ... it's high enough that I really just drink it on the weekends.

 

But I'd be happy to come sample the Norwegian coffee any time ...


Edited by paulraphael (log)

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