Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Condiments'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Categories

  • Help Articles

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 570 results

  1. Rachel Perlow

    Honey Fig Jam

    Honey Fig Jam 1 pt figs 1 c honey 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp all spice 1/4 tsp salt 1 tsp ginger, freshly grated 1 lemon or small orange, finely grated zest and juice Wash, remove the stem and blossom end of figs, cut in quarters. Put in heavy bottomed pot with the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 1 hour. Remove lid, remove figs with a spoon to a food mill fitted with large holed disk. Pass fruit through back into pot, discard skin left in the food mill. Stir pulp into liquid. Simmer for another 10 minutes or so then place into clean jar and store in the fridge. Yields about 1 cup. Keywords: Fruit, Dessert, Vegetarian, Intermediate, Breakfast, Topping/Frosting ( RG1156 )
  2. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  3. Honey-Mustard Rotini with Chicken Serves 8 as Main Dish. This is a standby disk that I make whenever I can't decide what else to make. I've made variations with basil in lieu of or in addition to the parsley, adding heavy cream, sour cream or yogurt, adding sun-dried tomatoes, whatever, but at it's base it's a simple, inexpensive, filling dinner. 1 lb Chicken thighs, boned & skins removed, cut into bite-size pieces 1 medium onion, chopped 2 T minced or pressed fresh garlic 1 T olive oil 1/2 c your favorite prepared mustard 1/4 c olive oil 1/4 c honey 1/2 c toasted pine nuts 2 T minced fresh parsley 1/2 c freshly grated Parmesan or other fragrant hard cheese 1 lb rotini or other bite-size pasta, cooked 1. In a skillet, saute chicken, onion & half of garlic in 1 T olive oil until chicken is just cooked. 2. In a bowl, whisk together mustard, 1/4 C olive oil and honey until fully combined. Add pine nuts, parsley, cheese, and chicken mixture; stir to combine. 3. Stir mixture into hot pasta and serve, topping with additional cheese. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner ( RG2055 )
  4. I am looking for a recipe. I got from someone a jar of Jalepenos pickeled in a sweet soy sauce brine. It was amazing. Crunchy, sweet, salty and hot. I couldn't stop eating them. Now they are all gone and I don't have a recipe for it. I don't know the Korean name for it but the this soy sauce based sauce is also used to pickle other vegetables (e.g., garlic). I would really appreciate the recipe. Thanks in advance... Soup
  5. Tamarind chutney (Imlee kee chutney) Tamarind makes a sweet and sour chutney with the consistency of hot fudge sauce. It's an important element in the street- and snack-foods of northern India. Suvir Saran 1 T canola oil 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp ground ginger 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1/2 tsp fennel seeds 1/2 tsp asafetida 1/2 tsp garam masala 2 c water 1-1/4 c sugar 3 T tamarind concentrate Combine the oil and the spices in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat and cook, stirring, 1 minute Add the water, the sugar and the tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, turn the heat down and simmer until it turns a chocolaty brown color and is thick enough to coat the back of the spoon, 20 to 30 minutes. (While still warm, it will look like a thin chocolate sauce and it will thicken a bit as it cools.) Makes about 1 1/4 cups. Keywords: Easy, Condiment, Indian, The Daily Gullet ( RG181 )
  6. Lindacakes

    Gotta Find the Jam, Man!

    Somewhere I read about an expansive jam from Britian, can't remember where I read about it (Here? Gastronomica? The Saturday Evening Post?) but a woman described it as teeny tiny whole strawberries and oh-so-delicious. Cannot google myself into it . . . The preserving thread, which captivated me yesterday, made me remember it. Can you help me?
  7. joey madison

    Joe's Jambalaya

    Joe's Jambalaya Serves 4 as Main Dish. When most people think of Jambalaya, they generally think of a dish that includes rice, tomatoes, and various meats. This recipe is different -- a modern interpretation of an old favorite -- because it follows a more northern Louisiana tradition and omits the tomatoes. I think it makes the dish more elegant and subtle. It refridgerates reasonably well, and I like to serve it with a simple Italian country loaf of bread. It's a fairly flexible recipe, so feel free to experiment. 1 whole chicken breast 2 links of andouille sausage 1 c shrimp or other seafood (optional) 1 c long grain white rice 1 c water 1 c dry white wine 1 c chicken stock (preferably homemade) 1 large red bell pepper 2 ribs of celery 1 hot pepper of your choice (optional) 1 tsp Tabasco (or more) 2 T unsalted butter T fresh Italian parsley 1 tsp dried thyme salt and pepper to taste Dice the chicken breast into 1 inch cubes. Salt and pepper the chicken to taste. Heat a large dutch oven over a medium flame. Add the butter, and when it begins to foam, at the chicken to the pot. Brown slightly, but be sure not to over cook. Add the bell peppers and celery, coarsely diced, and stir for a minute. Then add the rice. While your performing the above tasks, bring the wine, water and stock to a bare boil in another pot. Add the liquid mixture to the dutch oven, along with the thyme, tabasco, and parsley. Add the sausage, cut into 1/4 inch slices to the same pot. If desired add a diced jalapeno, habanero, thai pepper, or whatever. Simmmer covered for 20-25 minutes or until the rice is softened but not pastey. If desired you can add shrimp or other seafood a few minutes before serving. Careful not to overcook the seafood. Taste and add additional salt if needed. Garnish with choped fresh parsley sprigs. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner, Hot and Spicy, American, Lunch, Pork, Fish, Rice ( RG1225 )
  8. Abra

    Jamie's Velvet Thighs

    Jamie's Velvet Thighs Serves 4 as Main Dish. Dedicated to JamieMaw, to thank him for his gift of a jar of the delicious Mission Hill Plum and Pinot Sauce, and named for the velveting technique borrowed from Chinese cuisine. 6 large boneless skinless chicken thighs 4 egg whites 2 T cornstarch 3 T duck fat 1 c Mission Hill Plum and Pinot Sauce 1/2 c heavy cream salt and pepper Using a fork, beat the egg whites lightly with the cornstarch. Drop in chicken thighs and mix well with hands to coat chicken. Let rest for 30 minutes. Heat duck fat in a large skillet until very hot (don't use nonstick!). Drop in chicken pieces, season the side facing up, and let them cook over a medium-low heat. The chicken will stick to the pan, but cook until bottom side is golden brown. Turn chicken, scraping up the stuck golden bits. Cook like this, turning and scraping occasionally, for 15-20 minutes. Pour the plum sauce over the chicken, turning gently to coat chicken evenly. When the coating has absorbed the sauce, pour the cream evenly over all. Cook, turning, until chicken is done through and crispy golden. Adjust seasoning. Made like this, the chicken is just slightly spicy. Increase the amount of plum sauce for a spicier dish. NOTES : Use the very best chicken you can get. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Hot and Spicy ( RG1640 )
  9. lovebenton0

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney i love chutneys with all kinds of meat, fish and even simple chutney sandwiches, as Monica Bhide suggests in Everything Indian. thanks, snowangel, for suggesting this one i concocted would be good with a sharp cheddar grilled cheese sandwich; it is. this is especially good also with pork, chicken and salmon. makes one pint chutney. 2-1/2 c rhubarb, diced 1/2 inch 1 c unsweetened pineapple, sliced and chopped 1/4 c golden raisins 1/4 c cider vinegar 3/4 c sugar 2 T ginger, minced 1/4 tsp ground cloves 1/4 tsp curry powder 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp hot thai chile flakes 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 T grapeseed oil 1/2 tsp kosher salt mix fruits with sugar and vinegar. allow to set for about an hour to extract juices and soften raisins. stir in spices, oil and salt. i wanted to try out the jam setting on my kneadful thing and did so. that was great, no muss, no stirring. otherwise i would have cooked this on medium low heat for about 30 to 45 minutes (depending on preference), stirring as needed to keep it from sticking. store in jar in fridge up to two months. Keywords: Condiment, Fruit, Easy, Hot and Spicy ( RG1975 )
  10. jhlurie

    Salsa versus Chutney

    Got a mango-black bean salsa today at Whole Foods in Edgewater and it reminded me of our older thread where we were debating the differences between Salsas and Chutneys. Has anyone dug up any further info on if there is any major difference. Take out the black beans and today's salsa was chutney. I swear.
  11. I'm planning a bbq in a couple of weeks where I'll be serving homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream along with some sort of ginger cookies. I'm trying to think of a tasty and unique way to incorporate Sriracha in maybe a caramel sauce, or a candied nut...something of that nature that can go over the ice cream. Any ideas or experience with this?
  12. Parents across for a couple of days next week, and taking us out for dinner Wednesday. They're staying in St James and had booked a table at Quaglino's, as Dad had walked past a couple of times and thought it looked small and intimate (!) and it's got two red forks in his Michelin, which apparently means that it's 'particularly welcoming'. I swiftly disabused him of its diminutive size and intimacy, to which he suggested that I book something instead. First thought was L'Oranger, but haven't been for years and concerned that it might get a bit pricey. Second thought was Le Caprice but also haven't been for years and concerned that it's not particularly welcoming (for non-regulars). Having been lurking for a long time, I know what an opinionated bunch you all are (although less so without Simon M's input), so can anyone either comment on the two choices noted, ideally based on recent experience, or suggest something else. Would really like to keep it to £300-400 for dinner, with a modest attack at the wine list. ta
  13. Carlo A. Balistrieri

    Jujube preserves

    On a recent visit to North Carolina I had a great cocktail called a "Hot Date." It was made with jujube preserves (Chinese red dates?) and I've been looking for them ever since--and on line--to no avail. Can someone help with a NYC or mail order source?
  14. Monica Bhide

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish This recipe is from The Beginner's Guide to Regional Indian Cooking in th eCGI ¼ cup black mustard seeds ¼ cup white mustard seeds A touch of garlic (Not traditional but the Chef loves it so we added it!) 4 fillets white fish (small Tilapia fillets) 1 tsp turmeric salt to taste Mustard oil to panfry the fish 2 Serrano green chilies, slit Soak mustard seeds (I use 50% black and 50% white) in water for 10-15 minutes. In a blender, grind mustard seeds and garlic with enough water. Start with a relatively less water and slowly keep adding water as needed. The final consistency will be a bit more liquid than Dijon mustard. Make sure that there are no whole seeds left over. In my blender, this process takes about 10 minutes. This will be your gravy. Don't forget to add a bit of salt and mix some more. Set aside. Marinate fish fillets with the turmeric and the salt. Heat a shallow pan with a little bit of mustard oil, over medium high heat. When oil starts to smoke, add in the fish pieces so they are in a single layer. After a minute or so, turn them over, and cook until brown. Remove from heat. In the same oil add the mustard paste. Add some slit green chilies for some heat. Cook the mustard paste until it starts boiling and then add the fish. Simmer for another 3 – 5 minutes. Serve hot. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish, Indian, eGCI ( RG884 )
  15. Rachellindsay

    Christine Ferber's chestnut & vanilla jam

    I have just started to make Christine Ferber's chestnut and vanilla jam. I have halved the quantities she suggested and have followed her instructions which were to put the peeled chestnuts, water, sugar and vanilla pod in a pan, bring to the boil and cook for 15 minutes, strirring gently. The next stage is for it to sit in a ceramic bowl overnight. This is the stage I am at. My mixture went solid the minute I put it in the bowl. The sugar is now quite hard and I suspect that I had the heat too high when I cooked it for the 15 minutes. I have two questions. 1. Ought I have cooked it for a shorter period given that I had halved the quantity of the ingredients, and if so, how long should I have cooked it for? 2. Is there anything I can do now to save it? My fingers are still sore from peeling the chestnuts and I am really reluctant to put it in the bin if anyone can suggest anything. The quantities I used were: 400g peeled chestnuts 400g sugar 200ml water vanilla pod Thanks for any advice.
  16. As many of you know, I'm a big supporter of the Las Vegas dining scene. Earlier this year I wrote a lengthy report on my experiences at the "Vegas Uncork'd" events sponsored by Bon Appetit Magazine. In October, the James Beard Foundation is coming to Las Vegas to host the "Taste America" events. It's an exciting opportunity for Las Vegas to be the host city of such an impressive culinary event--and another feather in the cap of the city's chefs and restaurant community. You can check out the calendar of events at; http://www.jbftasteamerica.com/home I'm looking forward to it and I'll be doing a full photo report for everyone. If you happen to be coming to Las Vegas for the events, let me know.
  17. Next week I will be volunteering at the James Beard house as a student chef. I figured that this will be a good opportunity to get in a little practice and learn some new techniques. I was told that the typical work will be prep and maybe some plating. My main concern is that I studied baking and pastry in culinary school. I was not taught knife skills, meat fab, etc... that I might have to do. The volunteer coordinator at the James Beard Foundation assured me that I will be able to be of use. Given that i am paying approx $35 round trip train ticket from New Haven, CT to volunteer, I want to make sure that i will be of service. What do you think? Thanks, Dan
  18. First this is a general inquiry about high quality good tasting dark chocolate in UK for eating. We know about Green and Black's which is made in Italy. Second, have you heard, or do you have web site for James Chocolate , Evercreech, Somerset, BA 4 6LQ. They have some wonderful tasting chocolates with rose, lavender, etc that someone gave us but they do not remember where they got it.
  19. I am canning pickles today and would like to do some with asian flavors. I have in mind to add a few drops of sesame oil for flavor to one of my brines. Is this O.K. or will the oil throw off the preserving factor?
  20. Megan Blocker

    Curry Chutney Spread

    Curry Chutney Spread Serves 10 as Hors d'oeuvre. There are many variations on this, including ones that substitute smoked almonds for the bacon (a great tip for vegetarians), but this is my all-time favorite. I often forgo the processing of the chutney - as long as your chutney isn't super-chunky, you should be able to make this without dirtying your Cuisinart! 8 oz cream cheese (light or regular), at room temperature 1 T curry powder 8 oz mango chutney (one jar) 6 strips bacon, cooked until crisp, drained, and crumbled 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped In a small bowl, combine the cream cheese with the curry powder until mixture is well-blended and smooth. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the chutney a few times (until lumps are gone). Spread cream cheese mixture evenly over the bottom of an 8-inch quiche or pie dish. Spread the chutney on top, then top with crumbled bacon. Add the scallions evenly to the top. Serve with hearty crackers or small whole-grain toasts. Spread will keep, covered in plastic wrap and stored in the fridge, for up to two days. Bring to room temperature before serving. Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Dip ( RG1384 )
  21. jackal10

    Green Tomato Chutney

    Green Tomato Chutney Adapted from Bulletin 21 "Home Preservation of Fruit and Vegetables", Her Majesty's Stationary Office, first published 1929 You can adapt this for any garden surplus: apples, marrow, plums etc. Liquidised and sieved you can use it as the basis for a brown (steak) sauce. The long slow cooking and maturing gives a mellow dark brown chutney. The basic ingredients should be cut up and cooked so that the result is not completely smooth, but nothing is directly recognisable. Raisins, small cubes of crytallised ginger etc may be added to give character. 8 lb Green tomatoes 2 lb Apples 1 lb Raisins 2-1/2 lb Onions 2 chillis (more if you like it hotter) 1 oz Ginger 1 oz Salt 2 lb Brown sugar 2 pt Vinegar Cut up the tomatoes, peel and chop the onions and apples. Chop the raisins if they are large. Chop up the giner and the chillis, and tie them in a piece of muslin Place everything in a large pan, bring to the boil and simmer slowly until the desired consistency - about 8 hours. Remove the bag of spices and bottle in preserving jars (canning jars) while hot. Leave for a month or more in a dark cupboard. Keywords: Condiment ( RG1416 )
  22. savethedeli

    Guss's pickles

    Guss's pickles in the Lower East Side (the place with the barrels on the sidewalk) is fighting United Pickle for the rights to the Guss's name. New York Times
  23. teapot

    Super Bowl 2014 -- Feast mode!

    So excited that our Seattle Seahawks are in the Super Bowl this year! What are people making? Any Seahawk fans planning a Seattle-inspired menu? One that doesn't involve any last minute cooking? I'm making sourdough bread and bacon/onion jam to go with someone's beef tenderloin. To bring in some Seattle touches, we'll have smoked salmon, a Northwest berry cobbler. And as a nod to Seahawk colors: blue corn chips and guacamole. There'll be IPAs of course (Seattle's a very hopped up city)but I'm also trying to come up with a clever cocktail - or hawktail (I've thought of making blue rock candy to use as a sugar rim on a sage margarita).
  24. When looking over some dried cherries and blueberries yesterday, I wondered if they could be reconstituted and made into preserves or jams. I've made a few things like this, and can't, off the top of my head, think of any reason it wouldn't work. But "few" is a key word. I'm interested in hearing the thoughts of more experienced preserve, jam, and jelly makers.
  25. Renee K

    Jelly Roll Sponge I

    Jelly Roll Sponge I 200 g eggs 120 g caster (superfine) sugar 125 g cake flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 40 g oil sift flour and baking powder together twice whisk egg whites till foamy, and gradually add the sugar. at soft peaks, add the yolks gradually and continue whisking to ribbon stage fold in the dry ingredients, followed by the oil pour into 28cm x 36cm (11 x 14 inch) or 25 x 36cm (10 x 14 inch) swiss roll pan bake at 200C (ummm... I think that's about 400F??) for about 8-10 minutes, depending on oven. Do not overbake. unmould immediately onto a wire rack once cool, spread with filling and roll up Keywords: Dessert, Cake ( RG1810 )
×