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Found 955 results

  1. Not only would I buy an egullet cookbook, I would contribute to it being made!! Did anyone ever think of having our own egullet cookbook? Maybe a ring folder type that can be added to on a yearly basis...I wish there was such a one.
  2. Hi all, Does anyone know if there are any new or recent (published within the past 10 years) cookbooks on the cooking of Tahiti/French Polynesia in English? I could only find Jean Galopin's La cuisine de Tahiti et de ses îles (ISBN 2950243428) and Lisa Mairai Bellais's Cuisine de Tahiti d'hier et d'aujourd hui (ISBN 2915654174) but they are in French only. My interests on this srea is primarily on the cooking of Tahiti since I went to the place as a stopover a few years ago and found the food very different but strikingly good (perhaps the chefs have French training - even the average Sofitel hotel chefs cook better than their counterparts in New Zealand), and I also like the fusion between native Tahitian cooking (similar to other Pacific Islands) and French cuisine. Any information will be much appreciated. Regards,
  3. Hi all, Does anyone have actual experience with preparing recipes out of Prudhomme's books? I have been pondering about buying his books Louisiana Tastes and Louisiana Kitchen but am afraid 90% of the recipes would call for buying his merchandise before proceeding in the style of "4 teaspoons of Chef Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Magic" or "buy crab boil - it should be available everywhere", which because I'm from overseas, neither are available in NZ. Do the 2 books advise methods to make spice mixtures from scratch? That will make things a lot easier for us overseas readers. Thanks
  4. Hi ive been searching for Est Est Est by Donovan Cooke, its gone out of print but does anyone know where I can get a hold of a copy, same goes for Noma's first book in English, also just out of print. Would love your assistance
  5. Quick thought: A lot of textbooks these days are going digital; the publishers offer a copy to download from their website at a lower cost. Do you think the same could or would or will happen with cookbooks? I think it would be wonderful if they did... just think about the database of recipes you could search through instantly on your computer...
  6. With all the new cookbooks I'm sure we've received for the holidays, has anyone started throwing out/giving away/selling their books to make room? What criteria do you have for keeping or throwing away your books? I'm already beginning to look in askance at some books that were gifts, and I only have one small shelf of cookbooks. It seems obvious that you'd get rid of books you never use, but has anyone ever thrown away a copy because they've used it too much?
  7. I returned a couple of cookery books to my local library and was thrilled to bits to find "Yes Chef" on the shelves. Its contains "100 Great British Recipes from 20 Great British Chefs", including, Marcus Waring, Jason Atherton, Michael Caines, Nathan Outlaw, Glynn Purnell, Mark Hix, Anthony Demetre, Tom Kitchin, etc,etc,etc. Most of the chefs are Michelin starred and I just can't wait to tackle some of the recipes. I deem myself to be fortunate enough to have dined at quite a few of their restaurants so its a real pleasure to recreate the style of cooking. A lot of them seem to be signature dishes and most of them are very do-able to a cook of my standing. From a personal point of view, I can without hesitation recommend this book.
  8. So I figured I'd 'fess up. I tend to get an inspired to buy cookbooks from different sources. Sometimes amazon, sometimes people's reccomendation, and yes the egullet forums. Recently two times I purchased a cookbook that I already had. (of course I do have several hundred). So I was wondering if I"m the only one, or has this happened to anyone else?
  9. I was browsing through some confectionery books on Amazon and was excited to see a new book coming out with Peter Greweling - Chocolates and Confections at Home with the Culinary Institute of America. http://www.amazon.ca/Chocolates-Confections-Culinary-Institute-America/dp/0470189576/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256174107&sr=1-17 Finally something to put on my wish list!
  10. My copy of eGullet Society board member Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking arrived a few days ago. I know many members have been waiting for it as long as I have, especially those who helped Paula with her recipe testing. And it looks like it's more than worth the wait. A helpful clay pot primer on types of clay pots and how to season them starts off the book. Chapters follow on First Courses Soups Fish and Shellfish Chicken, Duck and Other Poultry Meats Pasta and Grains Vegetables and Beans Savory Pies and Breads Egg and Dairy dishes Desserts Has anyone else seen the book yet? What do you think?
  11. Pardon me if there's already a thread, but I haven't seen one in all my searching and I'm really interested in this book. I happened to pick it up at the library on Saturday and I've been looking through it with various feelings since. I think most of it is wonder. I've never seen anything I'd rather eat more of than what's in this book. There are some particular selections which look especially incredible right now: The acorn squash sformato; the sweet pea flan; the goat cheese truffles; the asparagus vinaigrette; the duck liver ravioli; the pumpkin lune; the spaghetti with sweet 100 tomatoes; the penne with zucca; the gnocchi with venison and rosemary. My list goes on and on and about half the recipes in the book are on it. Not to mention the pasta recipe he gives, which I plan to try this evening. To give you an idea of how crazy I am, I don't have a pasta maker. I would love to know if any of you have made things from this book. Today is just the pasta, but I plan on making more than enough for at least 3 dishes for Adam and I. For a first dish, I may start with the beef cheek ravioli, though I plan to use brisket due to the fact that I highly doubt that here, in this tiny town in Iowa, I'll be able to find cheeks. I do plan to ask, though. Then we'll go to the tortelloni with dried orange and fennel pollen, though the pollen is going to be hard to source around here, though. And then the one that intrigues me the most because, as most of the people on my father's side of the family, we love the weed: asparagus and ricotta ravioli. I plan to make the ricotta from whole, lightly pasteurized milk. My grandmother grows asparagus, but I tend to go the more labor intensive route; here in Iowa, it grows in the ditches along the highways in massive quantities in the early spring. The wild really does have a better flavor than the store bought variety, but home grown tends to be about the same. I can just get the wild stuff about 2 weeks sooner. One other interesting thing about the book is that he mentions rhubarb being a 'nostalgic childhood memory', and I heartily agree. Both my grandmother and my great grandmother on my father's side grew it at home, and when my husband and I were looking for a house a few years ago I almost went with this one just for the four large plants that produced relatively large amounts of the stuff. As a child I used to eat the stalks raw, dipped in a little bowl of sugar, as a snack. If you don't like rhubarb in my family you're looked at a little funny. Hubby still doesn't get it. Anyway, this is getting much longer than it was supposed to be. Looking through this book made me yearn to live somewhere I could more easily get the ingredients used. Sourcing the things or coming up with suitable substitutions is going to be interesting and fun.
  12. Well here I am stuck at home with a virus, not to mention snow and getting ready for company Thursday night and Super Bowl prep. My dad's birthday is Friday and I can't get out to look for something. I was thinking a really nice grilling book. He grills a lot and has both a gas grill and an Egg and he's pretty good. So nothing too basic. BUT he's not the most adventuresome eater, so nothing too exotic, either. Can anyone recommend something that I could order and have sent? Thanks so much!
  13. What do you guys do when you buy a new book? Read through for ideas? Make one or two recipes? Cook your way through it (in any meaning of the phrase)? Just to add to the discussion, I have... ten, including a gem from the feminist '70s called "The Political Palate".
  14. I'm interested in a really good Southern cookbook. Not New Orleans or strictly bbq, but something that explores other regional foods. I'm probably going to get Edna Lewis, but I was wondering if there was anything else folks could recommend?
  15. Hi folks, i was looking to get my wife a couple of pastry books for her birthday and have my eye on the following pair: The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Pastry Arts and Paris Patisseries: History, Shops, Recipes (English not out till Feb 2010 but the French very recently published) Does anyone have these books and what do you think of them? She says she's a beginner and she's been getting into baking cupcakes and cookies recently but is looking to take it to the next level. Of course I would benefit greatly too from her growing interest and am very eager to be her official taster. Any other French patisserie cookbooks suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  16. Has anyone else seen this? Amanda Hesser has started a series of weekly recipe competitions, with the winning recipes to be published in a forthcoming cookbook. Food52 What do you think of this concept? Anyone here participating?
  17. I was wondering what you all could suggest for a French 101 or Intro book as a gift. My Mom was in inspired by Julie/Julia and wants to learn French techniques. I think after I delved in a few years ago and cooked them several dishes that provided some impetus as well. At least I hope. She is a very accomplished cook in her own right so it need not instruct how to break an egg, but she has no basis in true French cooking. Thanks.
  18. I picked up this book before moving to China in hopes of having a few recipes I could turn out for dinner during the week. While there are several more ambitious dishes included (the yolkless egg with shiitake mushrooms comes to mind), I was happy to find lots of easy dishes with clear instructions. I've tried Mao's red-braised pork a couple of times, such that the page is completely spattered with brown sauce and grease from having been too close to the burner when the water went in the caramel. On Sunday, I made beef with cumin from page 102 - an exceptional success, and not more than thirty minutes from prep to plate. Alongside, I made the coriander salad from page 59 - fresh, simple, and green, adjectives which perhaps not a lot of people associate with Chinese food. Perfect home-cooking, however. While the design and the intros to recipes in the book give a real sense of place, it does suffer from something that a lot of other Chinese cook books do as well. [minor rant] The Chinese characters used in the recipe titles are traditional, and are accompanied by pinyin without the tones. So if you can't read the characters, you can make sounds in Chinese that have no meaning to Chinese people, but are pronounceable by anglophones? Why bother putting in pinyin without any guidance to the tones? I'm sure, of course, that this book is not meant to be used as a language source, but it's frustrating for me to try and describe either what I've made (to my Chinese friends) or what I'm trying to make(to the butcher or shop owner, while trying to get an ingredient) and have an incomplete set of information to work from.[/minor rant] I'm not hugely bother by this, and it's a point that can be gotten around by bringing the book to the market with me (tedious) or having my husband copy out the characters (useful only to the extent he knows them), but it's worth showing my support on paper, if you will, for the use of proper, toned pinyin in Chinese cookbooks. We wouldn't expect to see a French cookbook leaving off the accents aigu and grave, why lose the tone markers on pinyin?
  19. I'm really looking forward to this one.
  20. The eminent cookbook author Bernard Clayton Jr. passed away recently. From the NY Times' obituary, Clayton's Complete Book of Breads was probably one of the first "bread" books I owned. It's practically encyclopedic. As are his Complete Book of Pastry and Complete Book of Soups and Stews. Well, at least encyclopedic for their respective times. Maybe not the first books I turn to now for technique, but always good for an inspiration or two. Do you have any of his books on your shelves?
  21. I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  22. I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up. The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes. The final result is a really cool snapshot of what is going on in some of the most exciting restaurants in the world today. Has anybody else seen/bought this book? Have you cooked from it yet? Here's an eGullet friendly link Coco
  23. The Country Cooking of Ireland was named Cookbook of the Year by The James Beard Foundation. I have not heard of this book and have found no mention of it on this site. I was wondering who has it and your thoughts about it. Dan
  24. I've gone through the web looking for an older copy of the American Heritage Cookbook, but there are several different versions and I'm not sure which is which. Here are the copies that I've found: The American Heritage Cookbook and Illustrated History of American Eating & Drinking (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Company 1964) The American Heritage Cookbook (More than 500 great traditional recipes and 40 historic menus, tested and adapted for modern kitchens) (Paperback - Bantam Books 1975) The American Heritage Cookbook and Illustrated History of American Eating & Drinking, 2-Vol. Boxed Set by eds. American Heritage (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Company 1964) The American Heritage Cookbook, (Unknown Binding - American Heritage Press 1969) The American Heritage Cookbook More Than 500 Easy to Make Recipes by Helen McCully (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Co. Inc. 1969) American Heritage Cookbook (Hardcover - Random House Value Publishing 1992) American Heritage Cookbook: Boxset 2 Volumes (Hardcover - Random House Value Publishing 1982) Which is which? Who published the actual American Heritage Cookbook? Or are there many with no actual "original"?
  25. I just bought the River Cottage Handbook on making preserves, and I'm interested in getting one or two more. Can anyone here recommend a decent book on the subject? Ideally they would discuss a natural process, with as few unsavory ingredients as possible, or they would spend a fair amount of time discussing traditional ways of making jams (as opposed to modern ways that utilize newfangled equipment).
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