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Varmint

Deviled Eggs

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[Host's note: Split from another topic—the "collection" is the 2004 Deviled Egg Recipe Competition from Southern Foodways Alliance. -CH ]

What a fantastic collection, John T. Our own Maggie the Cat has two pieces in there (including a mention of how deviled eggs are often considered a "vegetable" in the meat n' three joints).

SFA member and Raleigh resident Debbie Moose actually has a cookbook that focuses exclusively on this wonderful item: Deviled Eggs: 50 Recipes from Simple to Sassy. Chef Ashley Christensen of Raleigh's Enoteca Vin features deviled eggs on her menu every day -- she was very disappointed to hear of this contest after the deadline had passed!


Edited by Chris Hennes (log)

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

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The internet amazes me everyday with new and fascinating resources for important information and discussion . And as a stand alone topic, it is hard to think of one more worthy of a little bandwidth than Deviled Eggs.

Maybe next year it could be celery and pimento cheese, or perhaps that mainstay of the Southern Holiday table, the relish tray. So many possiblilities, so much cyberspace. I'm sure that we will get to them eventually.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Agreed that divining the provenance of the deviled egg may take us to places we would rather not go, but am curious as to the origin of the term "deviled." Similar to deviled crab, is this a term for pepper or spice added to the product? Or, similar to deviled crab, is this a term for restuffing an old vessel with something new, as if it has been possessed? Where does this leave Devil's Food Cake?

so many questions....


William McKinney aka "wcmckinney"

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Agreed that divining the provenance of the deviled egg may take us to places we would rather not go, but am curious as to the origin of the term "deviled."  Similar to deviled crab, is this a term for pepper or spice added to the product?  Or, similar to deviled crab, is this a term for restuffing an old vessel with something new, as if it has been possessed?  Where does this leave Devil's Food Cake?

so many questions....

You're on the right track. According to Merriam-Webster, "deviled" means to highly spice, which makes perfect sense given what deviled eggs are.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Although I'm not by birth southern, nor is my family, deviled eggs were always a hot item for any holiday meals. Farm families had easy access to eggs, and they were, and are, inexpensive. The recipe my grandma and my mother use is the same one I use, from the Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook - the red plaid one. A few years ago, I tried a new recipe, one with crumbled bacon. What could be better than the addition of bacon? While they were all eaten, my husband said, "I like the old eggs better", so I went back to the tried and true. I guess it's better not to muck with tradition. My nieces and nephews love deviled eggs and one niece always says, "I definitely want TWO eggs.". I have often wondered how many it would take to satisfy 6 kids. Last summer, on vacation with my sister, BIL and their 3 kids, I deviled a dozen. Between the 5 of them and 2 of us, there were none left after dinner. I think deviled eggs will be one of their best food memories. :rolleyes:


Edited by Dana (log)

Stop Family Violence

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I'd like more information about what our own eG'ers put in their deviled eggs.

Me....oh, it does change drastically according to mood....butter, grated onions, dijon with caviar on top; mayo, pickle relish, yellow mustard for homestyle church suppers.

And other toppings I favor are smoked oysters, pimentoes, olives, green onion, bacon, anchovy.

How 'bout y'all? Any favorites?


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Just in case you are short on deviled egg related reading material (and really, who can ever have too much of that?) you might want tio peruse the recipes contained in the results of the Southern Foodways Alliance Deviled Egg Competition

I went to the "taste off" last year at On The Square Books in Oxford. There were some great examples of the things at that event.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I went to the "taste off" last year at On The Square Books in Oxford. There were some great examples of the things at that event.

You went to a deviled egg "taste off"? Which recipe won? Which were your own personal two or three favorites? I had no idea we had such an experienced expert in our midst!


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Everybody loves a good egg!

The winners are listed on the top of the page on the first part of the egg part of the site.

I particularly like Elizabeth Williams eggs, and also Rick Ellis's. The winner got to wear a handsome crown for the evening and I believe that you will find a picture or two of these deviled delights here, in Varmints phot blog from the SFA conference last year in Oxford.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Just in case you are short on deviled egg related reading material (and really, who can ever have too much of that?) you might want tio peruse the recipes contained in the results of the Southern Foodways Alliance Deviled Egg Competition

I went to the "taste off" last year at On The Square Books in Oxford. There were some great examples of the things at that event.

Considering that this is the Southern Food Culture forum and you are the host, do you have a favorite deviled egg recipe? :rolleyes:

Would smoked catfish or a garnish of crawfish (I call them crawdads here on the West coast) be out of the question?


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Just in case you are short on deviled egg related reading material (and really, who can ever have too much of that?) you might want tio peruse the recipes contained in the results of the Southern Foodways Alliance Deviled Egg Competition

I went to the "taste off" last year at On The Square Books in Oxford. There were some great examples of the things at that event.

Considering that this is the Southern Food Culture forum and you are the host, do you have a favorite deviled egg recipe? :rolleyes:

Would smoked catfish or a garnish of crawfish (I call them crawdads here on the West coast) be out of the question?

If you look at the link under "it's about the plate" you will see my favorite-although I must admit that the recipe with the capers was awfully tasty.

Also, as you read about the tasting, picture the logisitics involved in putting that thing together. That's a bunch of eggs. It was a ton of work. I am still in awe of that whole tasting project. It was well attended and the audience had a great time. Fortunately the crowd cleared out before the eggs began to have their inevitable effect. :blink::laugh:


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Deviled eggs are a mainstay at Midwestern potlucks. They are usually the first thing to go. I serve them at home often. They are easy.

I do the cold water, bring to a boil, remove from heat, let set 10 minutes, then put in cold water method, and never have green rings around the yolks.

I prefer mayo, mustard, s & p, and often add some very finely minced shallots.

I'll have to try some of the other ones on the links referenced again.

I don't think I've ever seen left-over deviled eggs!


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Funny about deviled eggs. They seem so homey, so retro, so cliche, so made-by-Betty-Crocker-in-her-red-checkered-apron.

But even at the most sophisticated parties, deviled eggs are the first things to go.

We've always loved them in our house. And last Mother's Day, my kids even gave me a cookbook all about them: Deviled Eggs -- 50 Recipes From Simple to Sassy

So many options. A favorite chapter entitled "Lucifer goes uptown," says this: "These little devils go gourmet with caviar, proscuitto or smoked salmon. Travel the globe with flavors from India to Italy, no reservations required."

And my family has particularly enjoyed this recipe (paraphrased, of course):

Pimento Cheese Deviled Eggs

6 hard-boiled eggs, halved

1/4 C finely grated sharp Cheddar cheese

1 T plus 1 t drained and chopped pimentos

2 T mayo or Miracle Whip

2 t Dijon mustard

2 t grated Vidalia or other sweet onion

1/2 t grated garlic

S & P to taste

additional chopped pimento for garnish

Combine egg yolks and all other ingredients except for garnish. Fill whites with mixture and top with garnish.

This is really very, very good. And combines two southern favorites.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I can't imagine an event of any significance without devilled eggs. Weddings, funerals, engagement parties, garden club meetings, all holiday gatherings, and other get togethers where the comment from the ladies is always, "Oh, I really shouldn't.... well maybe just one." :biggrin:

My grandmother and aunts still make them with the homemade pickle relish. I have strayed from my roots and use mustard and a bit of hot sauce.

I also have the dubious distinction of owning four old egg plates, each of which will hold a dozen halves.

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For some arcane reason, both of my old egg plates (one clear hobnailed, one milk glass with the memory of a gold rim) hold fifteen halves. Never could figure out the odd number--Cook's treat, I suppose. Or filchment by all passersby during the mixing and filling process...egg halves are fair game, as long as there are enough left to fill the plate.

Though I remember once that there were two empty spaces, so we put olives in the little depressions. And someone remarked at the clever idea--a non-cooking friend, as I recall.

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For some arcane reason, both of my old egg plates (one clear hobnailed, one milk glass with the memory of a gold rim) hold fifteen halves.  Never could figure out the odd number--Cook's treat, I suppose...

I think it's a matter of the plate designer having never made deviled eggs before. :hmmm:

Tupperware also made a devil egg carrier that only held something like 16 egg halves. What were they thinking when the natural inclination for the home cook is to boil up a dozen eggs at a time (empty out the carton)? So you ended up cramming the "extra" stuffed egg halfs into the empty spaces between the other eggs resting in their proper slots. It made for poor presentation but at least you could carry the entire dozen off to the picnic or potluck without incident.

By the way, Tupperware has finally corrected this oversight and now makes a 24-egg slot carrier.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Regular Deviled Eggs are a huge summer hit with my family & friends.

So, I'm looking for some, slightly, unusual variations on the traditional favorite. I was thinking of taking a small platter to a lamb roast this weekend --- any suggestions out there? Thanks -

Laurie

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Some of our family favorites are:

Crumbled, crisp bacon and horseradish

Anchovy and a tiny bit of garlic

Salsa.

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Regular Deviled Eggs are a huge summer hit with my family & friends. 

So, I'm looking for some, slightly, unusual variations on the traditional favorite.  I was thinking of taking a small platter to a lamb roast this weekend --- any suggestions out there?  Thanks -

Laurie

For future reference I highly recommend "Deviled Eggs: 50 Recipes from Simple to Sassy" by Debbie Moose. Great Book :wub:


Bill Benge

Moab, Utah

"I like eggs", Leon Spinks

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Ditto on the cooked, crumbled bacon. A yummy way to have bacon and eggs! Try to get a somewhat thicker sliced bacon. I like to cook the slices first, then chop it up and add it to the mix. And I like to use a small (1-2 tbl) scoop to fill the whites. Makes it so much easier and faster!


"Fat is money." (Per a cracklings maker shown on Dirty Jobs.)

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Deviled Eggs Provencal -- add chopped kalamata olives, capers, and a bit of Dijon mustard along with the mayonnaise.

Deviled Eggs with Smoked Salmon -- add chopped smoked salmon, snipped fresh dill, Dijon mustard, and a dab of sour cream with the mayonnaise.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Suzy beat me to the smoked salmon. Also like strips of roasted red peppers, a dollop of parsley pesto, or a bit of prosciutto or serrano ham.

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Here is a late Victorian era version, this one is from Cassell’s Dictionary of Cookery (London, circa 1870), but the same recipe is in a number of books of the time.

Eggs, Devilled.

Cut four hard-boiled eggs into halves, remove the yolks without breaking the whites; mix the yolks with a tea-spoonful of anchovy sauce, a little cayenne pepper and salt, and fill the white-cups with it; set them to stand, by cutting off the pointed tip, on a dish, surround them with small cress and finely cut lettuce. Time, fifteen minutes to boil eggs.

And one from "The Gentle Art of Cookery" by Mrs CF Leyel and Miss Olga Hartley (London, 1925)

Devilled Eggs

Eggs, two tablespoons of Worcester sauce, one dessertspoonful of French mustard, one ounce of butter, thick brown gravy, salt and cayenned pepper.

Boil the eggs for eight minutes; peel them, cut them in half, and remove the yolks. Make a paste of the yolks, cayenne and salt, Cut a tiny piece off the bottom of each half white to make it stand up, and full each one with the paste. Pour over them a sauce made of the gravy, French mustard, and Worcester sauce. Serve very hot and sprinkle them with chopped parsley.

- although this one is hardly party finger-food, what with gravy on it an' all!


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Mix sauteed liver with egg yolks and some mayo. Stuff the whites and top each half with a dallop of mayo.

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A bit bump.

Deviled eggs. They are always the first thing gone at a party or at a potluck. Have any of you ever had a leftover deviled egg?

So, what's new and exciting? Having just made a killer batch of larb, I'm inspired to make a Thai-style deviled egg, but here in the Midwest, folks are just plain happy with regular old deviled eggs.

Yes, I own Debbie Moose's book, but the idea of using a recipe for such a basic food goes against every grain of my body. A bit of this and that, and a good fork and spoon (washing out a sieve after mashing the yolks is such a pain, some mayo, mustard; perhaps some chives or shallots and vinegar is such a good combo...


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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