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Curing and Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 1)


FoodMan
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Spider lines, as some have suggested, should not exist in my opinion.

While those meat tubes look fantastic Ron, my first guess is that you are using an undersized stuffing tube to match your casings.

When you link and twist, any of those lines should dissapate.

woodburner

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Spider lines, as some have suggested, should not exist in my opinion.

While those meat tubes look fantastic Ron, my first guess is that you are using an undersized stuffing tube to match your casings.

When you link and twist, any of those lines should dissapate.

woodburner

Interesting, woodburner. I appreciate the input. I'm going to take it into consideration on my next run.

=R=

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After a week in the cool, dry attic:

gallery_19804_437_215753.jpg

It looks, feels, and smells amazing -- and comparable to the homemade stuff that I've been fortunate to have. I'm going to be making Naw Mai Fon following Russell Wong's recipe here in the next couple of days, so I'll report back about taste soon.

Chris Amirault

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Oh, Chris, that looks fantastic. Great job! I look forward to hearing how it tastes.

Can you describe any adjustments you might make next time around?

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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After a week in the cool, dry attic:

gallery_19804_437_215753.jpg

It looks, feels, and smells amazing -- and comparable to the homemade stuff that I've been fortunate to have. I'm going to be making Naw Mai Fon following Russell Wong's recipe here in the next couple of days, so I'll report back about taste soon.

Wow. Your lop yuk looks fantastic. Wish I could grab a piece right now. :wink::wub:

I have a question. Your pork belly looks extra long. Was this from some extra huge pig? :laugh:

Seriously, I've never seen pork belly that long. Please do tell.

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Can you describe any adjustments you might make next time around?

I will when I cook it up. I'm particularly curious about whether or not the addition of the shaoxing wine will impart a distracting taste.

Looks good Chris. What else can it be used for?

It will likely not surprise you that there is an entire thread devoted to lop yuk, a.k.a. "Chinese bacon": click here for that thread.

I have a question. Your pork belly looks extra long. Was this from some extra huge pig? :laugh:

Seriously, I've never seen pork belly that long. Please do tell.

I don't think it's extra long -- it may just be the photograph. Check the one above in the stairwell for comparison. I got these rind-on strips from my favorite local Chinese market, and I think that they were cut specifically for lop yuk.

Chris Amirault

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I am just astounded at how good this home cured bacon is:

gallery_6903_111_41443.jpg

It took much, much longer to reach 150F internal temperature when baked at 200F (and I checked my oven with a thermometer and it was dead on). The belly was quite thin yet it took almost 4 hours to reach temp.

I did find the first batch I fried to be a bit on the salty side so I blanched the next batch before slicing and frying it. This definitely did reduce the saltiness.

I also found it very difficult to cut thin slices with a knife from the length of the belly but once I cut the belly widthwise into two pieces, it became much easier to cut thin, even slices.

Now I am anxious to find more pork bellies and try some more variations. There is something so satisfying about curing one's own bacon.

It will make an appearance on our table on Saturday when we will be having our annual Danish Lunch.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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It took much, much longer to reach 150F internal temperature when baked at 200F (and I checked my oven with a thermometer and it was dead on).  The belly was quite thin yet it took almost 4 hours to reach temp. 

I found this as well, I should add. But isn't it just amazing? I don't know why we are amazed that home-cured is better, but it's true: I'm just floored.

Vivid lop yuk porn in a sec.

Chris Amirault

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I couldn't stand the thought of waiting until dinner, so...

gallery_19804_437_90710.jpg

gallery_19804_437_70931.jpg

gallery_19804_437_5406.jpg

gallery_19804_437_145735.jpg

gallery_19804_437_40989.jpg

It tastes remarkable, especially raw, with that unmistakable flavor of cured pork that you find in prosciutto. It is so good I can't quite believe it. The balance is excellent: I can't pick out the shaoxing, which suggests that it melted into the background of the flavor profile as it usually does. It could be a bit sweeter, though, so I'll up the sugar next time. The salt balance is excellent.

Since I have to get to work, I just decided to throw together some quick scrambled eggs -- results here.

edited to add link -- ca

Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

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As promised, the next series of bacon:

It looks like you were using foodsaver bags...did you just seal or did you vac and seal?

Looks awesome....

I vacced and sealed. I'm not sure if it helps, but I figured the more I can get the flavor to penetrate, the better.

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A follow-up on the lop yuk.

I brought a couple of pieces of the bacon to the folks who run the Chinese store from which I've bought the homemade lop yuk in the past, and we had a conversation about methods. Apparently, the shop owner's mom brines the strips for a while initially and then marinates them before curing them. She was also adamant that one should use the best shaoxing available, one with no salt added; I have a bottle of good stuff from that store that passes muster. I also cut them too thinly according to the proprietor, so next time, along with upping the sugar, I'll slice more thickly.

Having said that, I admit to being very proud of my lop yuk! They knew I was a bit of a food nut, but they were pretty blown away to see me walk in with that little gift.

edited to fix an unclear sentence -- ca

Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

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Can't compete with the lop yuk, but the corned beef came out great. Best I've ever had, although a little saltier than I'd like. Ridiculously easy, and an amazing transformation of a brisket.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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I sliced into my first peperone piece and it's very good, in spite of using too much Bactoferm. Has a nice spice level and good flavor. I think I'll use a coarse grind only next time as it seems too fine in texture.

Also made the breakfast sausage over the weekend. It improved greatly by aging overnight, the flavors married.

I had frozen some of the duck sausage and used it yesterday in a cassoulet of sorts with Rancho Gordo Runner Cannellini beans and Christmas Limas. What a treat on a cold night!

Now to get started on some bacon......

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Has anyone tried the Coppa recipe from Rhulman's book? I got air pocket and some interior mold. I was thinking that his recipe called for a large dice 2-3inches, i was going to cut it smaller 1/4 - 1/2 inch cubes before stuffing it. Any reccomendations?

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i have no idea where Rulhman or Brian got the idea that coppa is made with chunks. It NEVER is. It is made from a piece of the pork shoulder, a very specific piece, which is basically behing the head of the pig.

It is hard to explain without pictures where the coppa is located. In italy this is a butchered cut that is sold in supermarkets as a roast. Here you have to buy the whole shoulder (from costco or sam's or whereever) and "carve" it out yourself. Some shoulders come so mangled from the packers that it is almost unretrievable.

jason

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We found about five miles of perfectly good casing at the back of the fridge last night. Yippee!!

First up, the chorizo from "Charcuterie" because we had all the ingredients handy. Great flavor, and excellent texture.

Margaret McArthur

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I tried the turkey sausage w/dried cherries and it seemed to me the fat/protien ratio was too high. When I tried to cook some for testing it seemed broken to me. I have a couple of questions. Have you all found it difficult to keep a sausge from brealing when the fat content is high? Will a longer spin in the mixer help? I'll try this again next week and post the results.

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Just got a new slab of bacon started in the fridge, this time with brown sugar. Reports soon.

I tried the turkey sausage w/dried cherries and it seemed to me the fat/protien ratio was too high.  When I tried to cook some for testing it seemed broken to me.  I have a couple of questions.  Have you all found it difficult to keep a sausge from brealing when the fat content is high?  Will a longer spin in the mixer help?  I'll try this again next week and post the results.

Longer spin in the mixer -- and keep the ingredients coooooooold.

Chris Amirault

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