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Well, I don't like it raw. But ddalk galbi is just wrong without it, IMO. I love the way it goes all limp when it cooks down. If I made a serious attempt to keep eating it, no doubt I'd come to like it.

Uuuh - pajori is the shredded spring onion with chili? I'm indifferent on it, I think. It's nice to have, but I can enjoy my ssam in its absence. Garlic and sesame oil are key. Everything else, including ssamjang, is window dressing for me.

Oh boy, I think we need a ssam topic.

I know I'm late to this party but I'm totally on the Pa jori/muchim bandwagon. BBQ just isn't the same without it...

I like to roll mine with lettuce, ket nip, garlic, chili, ssam jang and scallions. YUM.

By the way, if any of you guys have a Costco type place near you check the meat counter for something called "flap meat." Makes AWESOME galbi, and it's a heck of a lot cheaper.

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Add 350g of mochi and 200 cc of water to a frypan. Heat the water up and add the seasoning paste - there's some in the pack, right? 150g worth, anyway. To this, add whatever vegetables you like - the package suggests onion, negi, and cabbage and something called dang myeon, which I think is some kind of noodle - maybe chinese yellow noodles - They could be suggesting a popular variation of ddeok bokki called"ra-bokki", a love child of ramyeon and ddeok bokki. But "street" ddeok bokki usually has negi, oden, and hard boiled eggs. Maybe a bit of onion.

Then you cook the lot down until it's got a nicely thickened sauce - it should cling thickly to the ddeok, which should be tender and chewy. It may take ten minutes of cooking to achieve this.

Enjoy with toothpicks.

For me the key to delicous dduk boki is ample cabbage. When the cabbage cooks in the sauce it really give it an earthy oomph that you don't find in any other dish..

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I had a Korean night last night. Bulgogi with extra mushrooms:

PA250004.JPG

Deonjang jigae, with tofu, chilies, radish, zucchini, and a mushroom broth:

PA250003.JPG

Served with rice, commercial radish kimchi, and a lettuce salad with a sesame-chili dressing. It was very comforting autumn food, especially now we're coming into mushroom season.

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Hi everyone! I'm still alive and kicking and yes still eating Korean food. Here's a lovely picture of some hwe du bap and yes I am eating it in November. It's very easy to make, healthy, and cheap, especially if you use frozen tilapia filets from the Korean grocery store. Unfortunately it's "bap" less as I have no rice in the dish - wanted to be more healthy. Instead it just has lettuce, gim, fish, flying fish roe, and some chojang.

15832_172736397201_518117201_3273267_4646230_n.jpg

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Last night I made kalguksu with shabu-shabu beef for dinner. Brilliant now I'm near a market with a noodle-maker that turns out five kinds of fresh noodle a day! I used a broth based with gochu-garu, instant dashi, soy sauce, garlic, negi, sesame oil, ground sesame seeds and a little cooking sake. I couldn't find minari, so I substituted fresh pea shoots instead, along with shiitake, enoki, shimeji, and another, unidentified kind of mushroom. Now I can almost perfectly recreate our favourite kalguksu experience from Korea, there's only one thing I'm missing: the restaurant we used to eat at had a dipping sauce for the beef that was a kind of thick soy-based sauce that had some wasabi and something else tangy in it. Anyone have any idea what might be in it?

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Nice! What kind of beef did you use?

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I used a plain eye of round roast. I did not have a good meat source so bought a big chunk. I seared it on the out side using high heat (to kill bacteria). Cut off the cooked part and had a "safe cut of meat" to use. When I can get some good safely handeled meat I will try it again with some tenderloin or strip steak.

This was good but the Yukhoe at the Tree House in Dallas, TX a few weeks ago was way better. I think that mine did not have enough fat content.

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I wanted a great photo of Yukhoe so I made it again.

To make this Yukhoe I used tenderloin, black pepper, sesame oil, sesame seeds a touch of chili oil, elephant ear garlic, green onion, egg and asian pear. It is sitting on Korean perilla leaves.

4259367701_ca561b519b.jpg

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Looks amazing powerplantop. Which meat did you prefer? I think some kind of round cut is actually traditional for yuk whe. I think something like a strip steak might work well too.

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Looks amazing powerplantop. Which meat did you prefer? I think some kind of round cut is actually traditional for yuk whe. I think something like a strip steak might work well too.

I think more traditional is round or chuck. I prefer the tenderloin but do think a strip steak would be nice.

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GOCHUJANG.jpg

I love this topic! But I have a question... The enclosed image is a liner from a container of gochujang. As you can see, the manufacturer has written 'NO!'..., and I was hoping someone could help me out with what the Korean says in English? Thanks in advance, gus_tatory :-)

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This Jjamppong 짬뽕 turned out great (and spicy). I started out with chicken stock then loaded it up with seafood and veggies. I did make one big mistake I put the red pepper flakes in to a hot pan. The pepper gas almost ran me out of the hotel. I finished making it but could not continue filming.

4415710594_8a41dd6035.jpg

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GOCHUJANG.jpg

I love this topic! But I have a question... The enclosed image is a liner from a container of gochujang. As you can see, the manufacturer has written 'NO!'..., and I was hoping someone could help me out with what the Korean says in English? Thanks in advance, gus_tatory :-)

The no is refers to, the addition of wheat flour which a lot of the cheaper brands use as filler.

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I have made gujeolpan on a number of occasions and eaten it in Seoul. The pancakes should weigh about 8 grams (max). I usually find it takes about one level dessertspoon of a very runny batter. Here is a photo of my most recent gujeolpan (I bought the dish from http://www.korean-arts.com/.

5640601038_65298c84d6_b.jpeg

I used (from top moving clockwise): marinated beef (just garlic, soy, sesame, sugar), cucumber skin, carrot, mung bean sprouts (topped and tailed), shiitake mushrooms, egg yolk, courgette skin, egg white. All ingredients are slightly seasoned and briefly stir fried first. I serve it with Korean mustard.

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Made a hybrid doenjang jjigae/sundubu jjigae, using mostly doenjang, a bit of gochujang, gochugaru, sundubu, potato, daikon, butternut squash, onion, Korean red pepper, spring onion, and a sprinkling of Hon-dashi. Served with Kokuho Rose rice with a Japanese mixed-grain packet thrown in, as well as kimchi and "Korean aster" - something I tried as a sample at Super H Mart and took home.

IMG_0805.JPG

First time ever making a jjigae with doenjang, I normally make sundubu jjigae (with a LOT of gochujang and gochugaru) or kimchi jjigae. Apparently I didn't have any firm tofu tonight...

(in case you couldn't tell I'm more familiar with Japanese ingredients, hence me using some Japanese terms)


Edited by Hassouni (log)

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I have the very same container of kochujang in my fridge , Having been told that

it will last for ever,

my kochujang must be 3 years old, but looks and tastes just how

it should.

Please advise.

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I can't imagine it'll be a problem with all that salt

Yes - also as with other items held long term, avoid contamination - use a clean utensil when scooping it out and don't "double dip"

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I made this a few nights ago. Vegetarian ddokbokki. Usually, I like fish cakes in mine, but since my husband is vegetarian, I had to use a vegetarian fishcake, which doesn't have the delicious fishy flavor, but still tastes fine. I forgot the cabbage, so my ddokbokki only has fish cakes, zucchini, and onion.

6233101671_2e766feebe_m.jpg

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i keep frozen beef stock in the fridge (anchovi stock works well too, probably more authentic) and have 4 go to soups: daikon (sliced diaikon cooked till soft), mung bean, soybean (soybean paste, pepper, squash, enoki, tofu), or kimchi (kimchi, tofu)


Edited by Dan C. (log)

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I have that book, as I can't watch the shows here in Germany, I have no idea if the recipes follow the show. The book is good, but a lot of fusion recipes.A lot of stuff she cooks at home with Georges, and her daughter. Which is fine, but if fusion is not what you are looking for then I would suggest another cookbook. Although one of the ones that really interest me is the recipe by a korean female chef. Sorry I don't have the book in front of me, but it has tofu in a shelled out orange. The kimchi relish for hot dogs, is something I grew up with as we assimilated korean food into american food, etc. I think it is an interesting cookbook. It will all depend on what you are looking for in a book. Not all of it is fusion but a lot. I like the drink recipes too, but for me growing up around the culture it is amusing to see similarities and differences. :)

I hope I am making sense I am tired right now.

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Thanks - I think I'll wait and hope that my library gets a copy.

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