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Korean Home Cooking


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BTW, I've bought jajang the other day and they had something called chunjang, also black bean based. It wasn't expensive, so I took a 500g jar home. Are jajang and chunjang the same, if not what is chunjang good for?

I don't think this question was answered. I also bought chunjang yesterday, and the guy at the oriental store told me it is the same as jajang. Googling seems to confirm it...

Yep. From what I understand, Chun Jang is the actual name of the (bare) sauce. Jajang/ Myun is the name of the prepared sauce/dish.

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Damn, that is a BEAUTIFUL looking home-made jajang myun. Holy cow.

Thanks :smile:

BTW, I've bought jajang the other day and they had something called chunjang, also black bean based. It wasn't expensive, so I took a 500g jar home. Are jajang and chunjang the same, if not what is chunjang good for?

I don't think this question was answered. I also bought chunjang yesterday, and the guy at the oriental store told me it is the same as jajang. Googling seems to confirm it...

Yep. From what I understand, Chun Jang is the actual name of the (bare) sauce. Jajang/ Myun is the name of the prepared sauce/dish.

I see. Good to know, cheers!

Christian Z. aka ChryZ

[ 1337 3475 - LEET EATS ] Blog

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Finally made my jajang myun today. It took me a long time to find that black bean paste! I became obsessed with it! :smile:

gallery_21505_2929_45504.jpg

Boy was this a good dinner. I was thinking that this would make an awesome hangover-cure. Almost worth getting the hangover for :biggrin:

Now that I have my big tub of jajang/chunjang paste, what else can I do with it?

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Finally made my jajang myun today. It took me a long time to find that black bean paste! I became obsessed with it!  :smile:

gallery_21505_2929_45504.jpg

Boy was this a good dinner. I was thinking that this would make an awesome hangover-cure. Almost worth getting the hangover for  :biggrin:

Now that I have my big tub of jajang/chunjang paste, what else can I do with it?

Jajang bap! I personally like this just as much, maybe better than jajang myun. Make the same sauce, pour over plain or fried rice for a quick easy delicious meal.

And don't forget the traditional/popular Jajang accompanyment of jjampong broth!

Edited by Joon (log)
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And don't forget the traditional/popular Jajang accompanyment of jjampong broth!

could you tell me more about that and maybe direct me to a recipe? is it something made with jajang paste, or eaten together with jajangmyun?

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Now that I have my big tub of jajang/chunjang paste, what else can I do with it?

The paste/dish is considered Chinese in Korea so you can variegate along that line. I've seen variations with squid, shellfish, all kinds of cabbage/veggies, etc. Served on rice instead of noodles, like Joon mentioned, is also popular.

Christian Z. aka ChryZ

[ 1337 3475 - LEET EATS ] Blog

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And don't forget the traditional/popular Jajang accompanyment of jjampong broth!

could you tell me more about that and maybe direct me to a recipe? is it something made with jajang paste, or eaten together with jajangmyun?

I like to take jajang sauce and dip my takuan and raw sliced onions into. This accompaniment is usually served on the side of jampong or jajangmyun at a restaurant or for delivery. Jajang sauce isn't really used for anything else, not for korean cooking at least. I would use it for chinese cooking as opposed to anything korean. If anyone else can think of another use for jajang sauce, let me know.....learning new things is always good :biggrin:

what is this jajang sauce accompaniment with jampong? is it the takuan and onion thing I mentioned, joon?

Edited by SheenaGreena (log)
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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So, I've made something new:

Saewoo Gochujang Bokum

(prawn chili-sauce stir-fry)

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum.jpg

20 X black tiger prawn

4 X garlic clove (big ones, sliced)

1 X ginger (thumbsized, julienned)

1 CUP scallion white (thinly sliced)

1 CUP scallion green (roughly sliced)

1 CUP bean sprouts

1/5 CUP rice wine

2 CUP cooked rice

2-4 TBSP sesame oil (pressed from roasted seeds)

2 TBSP honey

2 TBSP chili flakes

1 TBSP anchovy sauce

1 TBSP rice wine vinegar

1 TBSP gochujang

2 TBSP roasted sesame

1 TSP mung bean paste

saute garlic slices and julienned ginger in some oil

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_01.jpg

add prawns and gently stir fry at medium to high heat

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_02.jpg

add the scallions' white once the prawns turned all pink and stir fry for a moment

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_03.jpg

add mixture of gochujang, rice wine, anchovy sauce, rice wine vinegar and sesame oil,

stir fry for a moment then add chili flakes, roasted sesame and scallions' green

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_04.jpg

add bean sprouts, season with honey when the scallions' green wilted a little and the sauce thickened

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_05.jpg

serve on a bed of rice, garnish with some more roasted sesame and a drizzle of sesame oil

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_06.jpg

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_07.jpg

kingsized serving :biggrin:

Saewoo_Gochujang_Bokum_08.jpg

it turned out great, I can't wait to eat this again ... enjoyjoy :laugh:

Christian Z. aka ChryZ

[ 1337 3475 - LEET EATS ] Blog

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And don't forget the traditional/popular Jajang accompanyment of jjampong broth!

could you tell me more about that and maybe direct me to a recipe? is it something made with jajang paste, or eaten together with jajangmyun?

Well, I don't know if it's really traditional or not but most of the people i knew in korea had a habit of asking for the broth for Jjampong. It's a spicy noodle soup.

Here's a recipe: http://kalaniosullivan.com/General/Opinions-k2a.htm#JAMPONG

and a pic: http://www.econ.umn.edu/~stanleyc/personal_files/jampong.JPG

Man I'm getting hungry just looking at that!!

For home preparations it's probably not worth the effort. But then again I'm a lazy bum so YMMV! :D

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Now that I have my big tub of jajang/chunjang paste, what else can I do with it?

The paste/dish is considered Chinese in Korea so you can variegate along that line. I've seen variations with squid, shellfish, all kinds of cabbage/veggies, etc. Served on rice instead of noodles, like Joon mentioned, is also popular.

Some places also drop an over easy/sunny side up egg on top of the jajang. A part of me says that's just wrong...but it's also kinda tasty.

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what is this jajang sauce accompaniment with jampong? is it the takuan and onion thing I mentioned, joon?

Well, I have distinct memories of all of my korean relatives going to korean-chinese restaurants in the US, ordering jajangmyun and asking for a side of jampong broth. In korea it's considered included "service", but here no one seems to have it/want to give away the broth.

I do love the takuan and onion dipped in the sauce. I hope you're dumping vinegar on it! :D

Oh man am I hungry.

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  • 2 months later...
what is this jajang sauce accompaniment with jampong? is it the takuan and onion thing I mentioned, joon?

Ah! I was going through FatMan's blog and found a picture!

JJampong broth:

01.jpg

02.jpg

And going back to an earlier discussion, JaJang Bap: 04.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/fatman_seoul/tangbokbab/04.jpg

Original page is here: http://fatman-seoul.blogspot.com/2004_09_01_archive.html

Edited by Joon (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I recall from one visit to a Korean restaurant a delicious salad made from jellyfish and a variety of crisp, julienned vegetables, with a very garlickly, tangy dressing (which was very light and clear though), and I think topped with sesame seeds.

Can anyone help with this? I'd love to be able to replicate it. Thanks!

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  • 1 month later...
I recall from one visit to a Korean restaurant a delicious salad made from jellyfish and a variety of crisp, julienned vegetables, with a very garlickly, tangy dressing (which was very light and clear though), and I think topped with sesame seeds. 

Can anyone help with this?  I'd love to be able to replicate it.  Thanks!

Are you sure it was jellyfish? My first experience with Korean food, I had something that I thought was jellyfish. Turned out it was a jelly made from seaweed. There's also acorn jelly, which is also used to make a salad similar to what you're describing.

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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I recall from one visit to a Korean restaurant a delicious salad made from jellyfish and a variety of crisp, julienned vegetables, with a very garlickly, tangy dressing (which was very light and clear though), and I think topped with sesame seeds. 

Can anyone help with this?  I'd love to be able to replicate it.  Thanks!

My mom used to make this all the time - the "jellyfish" part looks/feels like it's noodles right? I'll ask her how to make it. Mmm, I miss it!

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  • 1 month later...

For some reason we hadn't had bibimbap for ages. With one of our Korean friends just moved back up the hill, the two of them snapped and had to go on a bibimbap jag.

First things first, Yoonhi broke out the gosari stash, and soaked them back to a manageable state. This is part of the grandma gosari from Vancouver, hand picked by one old lady reknown for her ferns.

gallery_22892_3828_5485.jpg

Then the rest of the fixings came together for the table:

gallery_22892_3828_103788.jpg

gochujang and rice vinegar worked up to a runny stage, garlic and sesame with the fried zucchini, oee muchim - cucumber salad/marinated cuce's, the toraji (which she was splitting with a satay skewer in an ominous moment this afternoon), and reconstituted dried mushrooms.

gallery_22892_3828_78419.jpg

And then there're some blanched sprouts (no kunnamul to be had) marinated with the "usual" spices, some beef (just in the corner), shredded moo, and more cucumbers (our friend brought some, too).

gallery_22892_3828_198608.jpg

Everything was piled up on top of the rice and fried egg.....

gallery_22892_3828_189914.jpg

and then all mixed up.

An interesting comment came from the table. As we were all so starved for bibimbap, the first bowls disappeared in pretty much record time. It just seemed right to have seconds, but the enjoyment....something....was gone.

Our friend summed it up "You know, you always want that second bowl, but somehow it never tastes as good as the first bowl, and it gets to be a lot of work to eat."

Me, I was just waiting for someone with a pin to pop me.

Note: editted for a rogue comma.

Edited by Peter Green (log)
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good to see that another korean family makes "messy" bibimbap like my family. It's just pointless to pile stuff neatly in their own section...because to me it's like a "garbage" dish where you throw everything in the fridge into a bowl of rice with hot sauce and sesame oil.

I don't know if this is easier, but I split my toraji with a sturdy toothpick. It's easy to handle, but breaks easily. Does your wife squeeze the salt into the toraji? I do that, but it never comes out as good as my mother...it always tastes really bitter.

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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  • 3 weeks later...

Does anybody have a recipe to make fresh ddeok (Korean rice cakes)? I now live in a rural area in the US and this is an item I cannot buy here, nor can I buy them online as they are best freshly made.

That is, not a recipe to use them (I already have that) but a recipe of how to mix rice flour or mashed up sticky rice to form the actual rice cakes.

Also a recipe for fresh Korean style noodles for jajang myeon and jombang

Thanks.

Edited by porkfat (log)
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Does anybody have a recipe to make fresh ddeok (Korean rice cakes)? I now live in a  rural area in the US and this is an item I cannot buy here, nor can I buy them online as they are best freshly made.

That is, not a recipe to use them (I already have that) but a recipe of how to mix rice flour or mashed up sticky rice to form the actual rice cakes.

what you do is, you look up recipes for how to make mochi. there is a nice thread here with some recipes:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=16333

regular ddeok is made of regular steamed rice and chapssal ddeok is made of steamed glutinous (aka sweet or aka mochi) rice.

Also a recipe for fresh Korean style noodles for jajang myeon and jombang
to make them proper, you need to make them chinese style and make them pulled. otherwise you can use regular kalguksu noodles for these two dishes (see post #97 above) with delicious, but different results. given that i couldnt pull noodles, i would prefer handmade kalguksu over store bought dried udon noodles which my mom sometimes does.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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Alright, I'm finally posting a kimchi recipe worth recreating. I got the recipe from Maangchi on youtube. I also used dried shrimp in an older recipe, but realized I can't stand any kind of fish chunks in fermented products. Maangchi uses raw oysters which I can't stand in kimchi either. Just give me some lemon, hot sauce and cocktail sauce thanks.

What you will need:

A:

Kosher or sea salt (non-iodized)

1 medium Korean radish (about two fists in size) or daikon radish - save a 2 inch thick slice and cube the rest

1 or 2 heads of napa cabbage, cut in half or quarters if too big

1 hot house aka english cucumber cut in any way you like your kimchi

B:

1 leek sliced thin

1 large carrot julienned

1 2 inch slice of radish julienned

2 bunches green onions sliced

C:

1 cup peeled garlic

1 medium white onion

1 chunk ginger the size of an egg or so

D:

1/2 cup Mochiko rice flour

1/2 cup sugar

3 cups water

1 cup fish sauce

2 handfuls (more or less to taste) of Korean hot pepper powder (kochukaru)

A:

Submerge and drain your cabbage

gallery_55504_4957_37254.jpg

Drain and salt in between every leaf

gallery_55504_4957_21873.jpg

Salt and mix your cukes

gallery_55504_4957_45159.jpg

Salt and mix your radish

gallery_55504_4957_34378.jpg

NOW for the next 4 hours or so your going to drain off whatever water leeches out into the bottom of each bowl and remix every hour or so.

When the cabbage is wilted and soft you're going to submerge, spray and rinse as much of the salt off of and out from between the cabbage, cucumber and radish. Squeeze out the cabbage like a sponge to get as much water out as possible. Repeat the rinsing process 2 more times. Trust me, if it's too salty still, you probably added way too much salt. All you need is a little sprinkle between each leaf and maybe 1 or 2 tablespoons each in the cucumber and radish.

B:

Julienned carrot, radish and sliced leek and green onions

gallery_55504_4957_48904.jpg

C:

Onion, garlic and ginger ready to puree and after

gallery_55504_4957_26032.jpg

gallery_55504_4957_2036.jpg

D:

Add rice flour, sugar and water to small pot just to boil. As soon as it boils, it will thicken and turn into a porridge. Let this cool a bit and you get this:

gallery_55504_4957_46249.jpg

Add together all of B, the puree of C and rest of D (fish sauce and pepper powder):

gallery_55504_4957_30137.jpg

And the final step: Spread a bit of chili paste in between each leaf of cabbage. The cabbage should be wilted and flexible. It should be easy to jam some paste deep inside the root end and spread it all around. Then roll it up and tuck it in with each other.

The cucumber and radish are simple, just mix in as much chili paste as you like. The more paste, the hotter the kimchi.

Finally, cover everything. Refrigerate the cucumber immediately (nobody likes fermented cucumber kimchi). Set the radish and cabbage out of the way for 24-48 hours and check it every day. Water will leech out of the vegetables and mix with the chili paste. It's good to refrigerate once the kimchi juices start to bubble, but not before as it will not be sour enough.

gallery_55504_4957_75852.jpg

You will probably have left over chili paste unless you're a fiend for fire. If you do, just store it in a clean jelly/mason jar in the fridge and use it to flavor soup, stir fries, salads etc. You can also mix it with a bit of sesame oil and marinate and preserve tofu. This kimchi can be made vegetarian by using light *Chinese* (Japanese has a tendency to taste alcoholic, like sherry) soy sauce instead of fish sauce. I prefer Pearl River Bridge brand. Look out for imitation soy sauce. Anything that says "hydrolyzed" or "caramel" or "caramel flavor or color" is chemically created and not real brewed.

Hope you enjoy!

Edited by porkfat (log)
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Porkfat - your images are not showing up. You need to save your images in your eGullet photo album, not linked to an outside article/site.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Porkfat - your images are not showing up. You need to save your images in your eGullet photo album, not linked to an outside article/site.

I hate being new to a forum... ;) It should be corrected now, yes? It was odd because I was able to see the pics just fine before. Thank you for your help!

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