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Korean Home Cooking


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  • 1 month later...

Made dakgalbi, haemul sundubu jjigae which was heavier on the vegetables than the sundubu, some panchan from H Mart (kongnamul, kimchi, and bujigangi), washed down with my favorite soju- Chum-Churum. When the dakgalbi was almost done, I threw some cooked rice in to soak up the sauce and crisp up on the pan. Delicious.

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  • 6 years later...

I've enjoyed reading this thread, it prompted me to cook Korean food again. I'll be honest, I rarely cook Korean food, but for some reason I felt like Haemul Pajeon tonight. Thanks @ChryZ! (if you're still around) Your Haemul Pajeon looked delicious!

 

Haemul Pajeon is a seafood pancake, just like @ChryZ made earlier in the thread. It is not like an American pancake, it is savory, not sweet.

 

I followed Deuki Hong's recipe from Koreatown. It got good reviews and it was tasty. If you ever want an easy, simple pajeon recipe, his is a good one. Of course, real Korean pajeon is more difficult to make, ChryZ's recipe is more traditional. If there's any interest, I'll post my rather drawn-out process how to make traditional pajeon. Both recipes are good! Deuki's is definitely delicious.

 

So first, I started with some seafood; shrimp and squid today, but it can be made with any combination. I bought the small bay canned shrimp for this recipe because of how he cooks his pajeon, I knew it couldn't handle the big shrimp. It was fine, much cheaper too. Squid needs to be cut into small rings.

 

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Deuki puts doenjang in his batter. Ingenious! I didn't have doenjang, so I used red miso, almost same thing.

 

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Here it is in the skillet. Deuki directs to mix all the ingredients together and throw in a pan. I was wincing, but it worked! Of course, any Korean ajima would be shaking her head in disbelief right now, since it's usually cooked with more steps. The miso (doenjang) adds another level of deliciousness to the batter. I'm stealing this for sure.

 

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And here's the final dish, served with jeon dipping sauce, made with soy sauce, white vinegar, sesame oil, gochugaru and toasted sesame seeds. I don't use a recipe, it's all to taste, approximately equal amounts of everything.

 

It was delicious! Happy eating for sure. It's great on it's own or as a side to Godeungeo Gui, broiled mackerel.

 

I'll try to post more to this thread in the following weeks. I bought some duk on a whim a few weeks ago, so I have to make some duk bok gee before it gets too hot. Yum.

 

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@Smokeydoke, that looks pretty close to okonomiyaki. Is it? I used to make okonomiyaki and serve it with caramel fish or caramel pork. A little Japan-Vietnam fusion, I guess. But I do love okonomiyaki. I'd eat it with either sweet chili sauce or sriracha mayo. Or both.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I never had okonomiyaki before, I learn something new every day.

 

It's very similar, but I think pajeon purists (is there such a thing?) would balk at some of the ingredients. Okonomiyaki sounds like a free-for-all, I've never seen cabbage in pajeon, although that sounds delicious.

 

Thanks for the heads up! I'll have to read more about it.

Edited by Smokeydoke (log)
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The recipe I use came from Food 52. I don't see it there any longer, but I preserved it in my blog, here. I've also done them with pulled pork, and I suspect you could use most any protein you wanted.

 

I love the dang things. Of course, I also love to just slice a wedge of cabbage, salt it, and munch it raw. Not to mention just about any way you can cook it. (Another Food 52 recipe for "Suspiciously Delicious Cabbage" is one of my favorites, too.)

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 4/6/2018 at 8:56 AM, kayb said:

@Smokeydoke, that looks pretty close to okonomiyaki. Is it? I used to make okonomiyaki and serve it with caramel fish or caramel pork. A little Japan-Vietnam fusion, I guess. But I do love okonomiyaki. I'd eat it with either sweet chili sauce or sriracha mayo. Or both.

 

On our last evening in Seoul, we ate at the hotel restaurant. It was seafood buffet night and everything was fabulous! One of the chafing dishes had okonomiyaki topped with ...maybe bonito flakes? Under the heat lamp, these flakes were moving - waving!
Kinda freaked my si-i-l and me out! The server was quit amused when I took a picture, but it was delicious...

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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