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Korean Home Cooking


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  • 1 month later...

duk or dduk or ddukk......all spellings will do (:

anyone know how to properly make toraji? Ever;y time I make it it comes out really bitter. My mom told me I have to rub it with salt and squeeze the water out, but after I do that it still comes out gross.

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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duk or dduk or ddukk......all spellings will do (:

anyone know how to properly make toraji?  Ever;y time I make it it comes out really bitter.  My mom told me I have to rub it with salt and squeeze the water out, but after I do that it still comes out gross.

I soak them overnight. In the morning rinse and squeeze, tear them into strips and THEN rub salt into the roots and rinse and squeeze again. And then season.

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duk or dduk or ddukk......all spellings will do (:

anyone know how to properly make toraji?  Ever;y time I make it it comes out really bitter.  My mom told me I have to rub it with salt and squeeze the water out, but after I do that it still comes out gross.

I soak them overnight. In the morning rinse and squeeze, tear them into strips and THEN rub salt into the roots and rinse and squeeze again. And then season.

you don't cook them? how do you shred them? I find that shredding them with a pointy toothpick works really well.

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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duk or dduk or ddukk......all spellings will do (:

anyone know how to properly make toraji?  Ever;y time I make it it comes out really bitter.  My mom told me I have to rub it with salt and squeeze the water out, but after I do that it still comes out gross.

I soak them overnight. In the morning rinse and squeeze, tear them into strips and THEN rub salt into the roots and rinse and squeeze again. And then season.

you don't cook them? how do you shred them? I find that shredding them with a pointy toothpick works really well.

I don't usually cook them for a namul-like preparation. I have pan-fried them occasionally. Splitting; I use a satay skewer as they are more sturdy than toothpicks, you can get a better grip on them but mostly because I seem to have literally hundreds rolling around my kitchen drawers - they just seem to appear and then multiply. As single socks are to my laundry, so are satay skewers to my cutlery drawers!

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This is the most beautiful thread--so inspired by your cooking, everyone. I love Korean food~!

I would not object if someone wanted to do a pictorial of a pajeon (green onion pancake), as I have not had great success with these (holding it together in one piece)...

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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  • 6 months later...
This is the most beautiful thread--so inspired by your cooking, everyone. I love Korean food~!

I would not object if someone wanted to do a pictorial of a pajeon (green onion pancake), as I have not had great success with these (holding it together in one piece)...

I'm reviving this, because I tried to make pajeon this weekend, and they turned out pale and floppy, and kind of greasy, too. I don't have a bag of pajeon mix sitting around, so I used a 1:1 ration of flour and ice water, plus shredded negi, since that's what I had on hand. Does anyone have a better recipe?

Anyone?

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This is the most beautiful thread--so inspired by your cooking, everyone. I love Korean food~!

I would not object if someone wanted to do a pictorial of a pajeon (green onion pancake), as I have not had great success with these (holding it together in one piece)...

I'm reviving this, because I tried to make pajeon this weekend, and they turned out pale and floppy, and kind of greasy, too. I don't have a bag of pajeon mix sitting around, so I used a 1:1 ration of flour and ice water, plus shredded negi, since that's what I had on hand. Does anyone have a better recipe?

Anyone?

Heyla Nakji,

I don't have a measurable recipe, but usually I use approximately 1:1 but I reduce the flour by a quarter cup and add rice flour. I just keep adding water until I get a thin pancake batter. Use a well seasoned cast iron pan or nonstick. Use only a little oil about 2-3 tsp. I mix all the ingredients except the green onions, and squid into the batter, then ladle the batter on the hot pan. Then I lay the green onions or chives neatly in one later row, then the squid. I place little of the batter on tip to barely coat the top with batter. Then I beat an egg and drizzle on top. I let this cook, and flip. Usually it comes out crispy and chewy. If I can find some time I will make some this week. Good luck.

Can you read Korean? If you can or you can use the translate feature, go to Kitchen Naver search Pajon

Edited for clarity

Edited by milgwimper (log)
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Nakji, here is a recipe for Pajeon batter from my friend.

For batter:

1 cup water (3-4 tbsp more)

1 cup flour

1 egg

2 tsp soy sauce

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp sugar

1/2 tsp dwen jang (Korean bean paste)

My apologies to gus_tatory for forgetting to make pajeon. I'll try to make some this week.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Wow, thanks, milgwimper. I wanted to make a big batch of these to tuck into bentos for lunch - my husband loves green onion, and I thought it would be a good filler. It was always the first pancan to be emptied at our table in Korean restaurants. I've been putting the green onion down first, then pouring the batter on, which may account for a lot of my problems. I will absolutely try your method, and check out the Naver site - I can read read Korean, although how much I'll understand is another question :biggrin:

I'd still love to see a pictorial, though, (hint hint).

kansa hamnidaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

eta: Dodie, we were posting at the same time. Thanks for the recipe! I'll post results!

Edited by nakji (log)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Kimchi Dubu, with pork belly - old kimchi, fried with pork belly, spring onions, extra cabbage, soy sauce and sugar, drizzled in a little sesame oil.

I prefer this with silken tofu normally BUT I managed to get this tofu fresh from the factory door this morning and the medium-firm was the only texture they were selling at that point..heavenly!

gallery_50383_5119_9823.jpg

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The tofu was indeed the best part (and there's pork belly in that there dish, so that's saying something...). The factory guy sent me away with a cupful of warm soy curds too, sprinkled with sesame oil and chilli.. :wub:

I love my Korean provedore guys. The dude at the butcher I regularly buy thinly-sliced pork belly, galbi, samgyupsal and chilli pork from told me today he'd "never seen a white girl buy so much pork".

So proud! :biggrin:

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rarerollingobject: Which Korean butcher do you go to? I ask seeing as you live in Sydney :)

Campsie Meat Market..sounds like a bad nightclub, isn't. It's just down from Campsie Station, on Beamish St.

They sell an amazing array of pre-sliced meats in freezers, including massive rolls of pork skin for $2! Everything is pretty much under $10, including 1kg tubs of chilli pork and beef bulgogi. It is a bit weird, as apart from the freezers, there is nothing to see; no windows of meat like you'd normally expect in a butcher, and you have to ask for the chilli pork/pork ribs/bulgogi but hey.

They have a dedicated kimchi fridge AND have just started selling takeaway containers of tiny marinated crabs for $5 - I've seen these as one of the included side dishes (panchan) in some Korean restaurants and they're yum - I'm soooo getting me some of those next time I go there.

My Korean friend was telling me it's famous in Sth Korea, and that lots of Korean tourists go there when they visit Sydney to buy meat to ship back home!

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rarerollingobject: Ooo nice. Campsie. I know the place (great mini KoreaTown!); I have a good friend whose parents own a fish shop in the area so I could ask her for further details if I get lost hehe.

Anyway, thank you! Those marinated crabs sound delicious -and cheap!

So they have a wide array of Korean meats ready for bbq? Yum yum yum!

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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  • 5 weeks later...

For Gus_tatory and et al who wants to make Pajeon.

I made a step by step tutorial on my blog. You can see it here...:Pa Jeon how-to

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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  • 2 weeks later...

gallery_41378_5233_207985.jpg

It's summertime, and the living's kimchi! Okay, that was really bad, I'm sorry. Anyway, when it's warm outside, I like really sour, cold things, so of course I made mul kimchi - the kimchi that eats like a soup. I first had this in Chuncheon, at one of the famous ddalk galbi restaurants there. It was winter, and they were keeping all their kimchis outside in traditional jugs, so when they served it to us, it had shards of ice along the top. I like to have it this way in the summer time, I think it's even more refreshing than gazpacho.

There's another kimchi like this, that I like even better, and it's made with some sort of field green instead of cabbage. I can't remember the name, though, to look up a recipe. Does anyone know what I'm talking about?

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Nakji - are you talking about the Sesame leaves kimchi (kkeanip kimchi) or the radish tops kimchi?

Neither, I think - although I like both of those. No, this is soupy, exactly like mul kimchi, but instead of having chinese cabbage in it, it has some sort of green leaf - it might be radish tops, but it's a cold soup, not a pickle. It might not be a kimchi at all, it might be a panchan. I'm not sure.

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Neither, I think - although I like both of those. No, this is soupy, exactly like mul kimchi, but instead of having chinese cabbage in it, it has some sort of green leaf - it might be radish tops, but it's a cold soup, not a pickle. It might not be a kimchi at all, it might be a panchan. I'm not sure.

hmm. domestic goddess might have got it right with the radish tops. yeolmu kimchi? it can be soupy, doesnt have to be served soupy though.

look through a couple pages of these photos: http://tinyurl.com/4orlaz

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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