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percyn

Breakfast! The most important meal of the day (2004-2011)

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I see your breakfasts are as devilish as ever, percyn! All is right with the world. :wink:

A fairly devilish breakfast myself; squares of butter puff pastry, spread with Dijon mustard, confit leeks, lardons of bacon, an egg cracked over and finished with white pepper and chervil.

2011-10-02 at 10.38.56.jpg

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Brioche and coffee this am.

Brioch 006.JPG

Recipe from "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day"

Fabulous.


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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That brioche photo makes me swoon.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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RRO – lovely breakfast. Whenever I see your beautiful and elaborate breakfasts I wonder what time do you eat, exactly? There would have to be at least 6 hours between rising and dining for me to begin to get my head around preparing all of that (see below – it took me 2 hours and a trip to the supermarket to make waffles and bacon!). My heroine :wub: !

PC – wow, that sounds good! What do red bananas taste like?

Jmahl – must search for that book (pretty sure I own it) – I need to have that bread.

Breakfast this morning:

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waffles and Benton’s bacon. Jessica crumbled bacon into her waffle batter. Wow. I meant to try it with a smear of warm bacon jam, but I forgot. Well, we have leftovers and I’ll try it with them.

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That brioche photo makes me swoon.

Too kind.


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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A few months ago I got a free Dutch Pannekoeken mix with an order from this vendor.

I had company for a late breakfast/brunch today so decided to prepare this.

My guests were very impressed with this (sausage patty on the side, didn't get a photo).

I had mine plain as the batter is just slightly sweet and is sweet enough for me with just a light dusting of cinnamon.

One of my guests chose apple-cinnamon syrup, one opted for a dried fruit compote and the other had ginger-orange syrup left over from candying.

All took away the URL address but one used my computer to place an order before they left to continue their trip to Las Vegas.

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Closeups -- "Money Shot"

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Pannekoeken closeup.jpg


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Andie - that looks like the Dutch Baby my mom used to make in her big Le Creuset skillet in the 70's served with powdered sugar and a squeeze of lemon. Beautiful. She used a recipe from Sunset magazine.

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Andie - that looks like the Dutch Baby my mom used to make in her big Le Creuset skillet in the 70's served with powdered sugar and a squeeze of lemon. Beautiful. She used a recipe from Sunset magazine.

For years I used the recipe from The Settlement Cookbook or from one of my Penn. Dutch cookbooks and they are all easy and good.

I've tried mixes in the past - I think one was from Williams-Sonoma - but none have really been as good as the "from scratch" recipes.

This one was excellent, though a bit thicker on the bottom because I made it in a smaller pan than noted in the directions.

I still have enough to make several more batches as the size of the package is very generous. I'm not usually fond of most mixes but I have yet to be disappointed by anything from Prepared Pantry. They have some items that I like to keep on hand for quick use - without having to take the time to do a lot of measuring &etc.

For Thermomix fans, one of the ladies on ForumThermomix has converted a recipe here, in case anyone is interested. I'll put the link in the Thermomix thread also.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Kim - red bananas have a full, almost vanilla custard flavour with hints of chocolate and tropical fruits along with a smooth, not so cloying banana flavour. The texture is also a great deal smoother than "grocery store" bananas. The flesh iteslf isn't red, btw, but the skins are - the flesh is a sort of pale pinkish colour.

I don't have photos at the moment (Rosados don't last long around my house, for obvious reasons), but when I do I'll post some.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Made some savory Oat Bran cakes for breakfast with a dollop of Strauss Dairy Sour Cream & some Poblano-Onion Yogurt mole

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Porridge is sooo two millenia ago... griddled cakes are so much more palatable :biggrin:

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Andie, we must be on a similar wavelength. Yesterday morning I couldn't find anything I could toast, so I was forced to actually cook something. I made a recipe I have for Dutch Apple Pancake. It looks like your Dutch Baby, but has caramelized apples baked into it. Having not grown up with Dutch anything, I really never heard of this type of puffed pancake until relatively recently. Considering the ingredients in my recipe, the result is, not surprisingly, kind of a giant reverse horizontal popover and comes out looking much like yours, with the height on the sides and the crater in the center. I bake mine in a cast iron skillet. The recipe calls for a dusting of powdered sugar but I see no need. I assume that Dutch Baby is the name of the pancake, and the dedicated pan is then the Dutch Baby Pan? What else do you do with that pan? A good breakfast, though. But back to reassuring toast today.

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Andie, we must be on a similar wavelength. Yesterday morning I couldn't find anything I could toast, so I was forced to actually cook something. I made a recipe I have for Dutch Apple Pancake. It looks like your Dutch Baby, but has caramelized apples baked into it. Having not grown up with Dutch anything, I really never heard of this type of puffed pancake until relatively recently. Considering the ingredients in my recipe, the result is, not surprisingly, kind of a giant reverse horizontal popover and comes out looking much like yours, with the height on the sides and the crater in the center. I bake mine in a cast iron skillet. The recipe calls for a dusting of powdered sugar but I see no need. I assume that Dutch Baby is the name of the pancake, and the dedicated pan is then the Dutch Baby Pan? What else do you do with that pan? A good breakfast, though. But back to reassuring toast today.

I don't have the "Dutch Baby" pan. I just use an "Everyday pan"made by Calphalon - the set of two pans, 10" & 12" were offered at a discount price a few years ago.

The original recipe is actually German, or rather from German immigrants and I think is in the first Settlement cookbook from about 1910.

There are also Amish and Pennsylvania Dutch (also of German descent) versions and serving with stewed apples was the usual topping.

I first came across it when I lived in Wisconsin for a few years in the mid 1950s. My stepfather was of German descent and his sister used to make these. Years later, when I was a fairly new bride, I was given an Amish cookbook that had the same recipe.

I have my old recipe on a file card, faded and stained but I did find this one online that is exactly like the one I make from scratch.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Andie, the recipe you reference on line is the same as mine as far as eggs, milk, flour and butter proportions. For the apples I take one large or two small apples, cut them into 1/3 inch wedges (don't even bother to peel them) and saute them in a pan with butter, a little sugar and cinnamon for a few minutes. They get set aside, and after the batter is poured into the buttered pan, the apples simply get arrange on the top. I think they keep the center from puffing as much as yours. Maybe the apples could go on the bottom, and then the batter could be poured over them and it might puff more. It is awfully good with the brown-butter apples.

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Breakfast this morning was chocolate banana bread (there are some walnuts in there too) french toast. I tried out the vacuum infusion method from Modernist Cuisine which is pretty simple. You put the bread and custard into a chamber vacuum sealer and vacuum until the custard begins to boil. That pulls the custard into the bread.

toast.JPG

Not particularly pretty, but very tasty.

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