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EatNopales

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  1. Inspired by a recipe in Nobu West I have been making a salad composed of paper thin tomatillos alternating with paper thin radishes (lightly dressed with 3/4 olive oil, 1/4 key lime juice, allspice & mex oregano) to form a wheel then you arrange ceviche blanco, smoked salmon & guacamole. Good summery main dish.
  2. Lately, I have dished mestizo style enchiladas in favor of pre hispanic style... it solves the issue of keeping them warm for multiple diners, skips the messy wrapping step, and offers greater plating & flavoring possibilities. Basically, you make a gordita on the comal (a tortilla that is anywhere from 1/4 inch to 1/2 thick).... after the surface is fully seared & you have the nice char spots... you simmer a batch in the enchilada sauce (such as the one referenced above) for about 10 minutes... then top with a wide range of ingredients... hard boiled turkey eggs, quelites, frog legs,
  3. Not sure if I missed these on earlier pages.... Pancake / Waffle / Biscuit mixes (wtf would anyone want to pay more for lower quality ingredients that have been simply mixed together... about 5% of the time spent making Pancakes etc.,) Soda (arguably the primary cause of food related disease in the world, low quality / harmful ingredients, synthetic flavors... particularly now with the prevalance of inexpensive carbonation systems... how hard is it to make a freaking syrup?) Sriracha (gawd awful, green garlic forward & filler ingredient sauce for people with no tastebuds!) Flavored Jello,
  4. Hi Darienne... the Mexican onions have extra long green tops.. and then you blanch them briefly to get them pliable & resistant. Buen provecho!
  5. Bump.... had a very small family gathering this year and continued the tradition of cooking dishes specifically from the Zacapoaxtla region of Puebla. To nosh... Roasted Dry Chickpeas & Favabeans tossed with Arbol Chile powder, salt & Key Lime; as well as Maize Tostado (basically artisinal / traditional Corn Nuts) Libation... Maracuya (Passion Fruit) Agua Fresca & Maracuya-Rum Ponche (that part of the country doesn't do much Tequila, Mezcal or Beer... instead they go with Aguardiente, Anise & Herbal moonshines as well as a wide range of tropical fruit punches) Rounds of Camot
  6. Whoa, whoa, whoa... Who do you think funds most studies on things related to consumer goods? Not a lot of people are sitting out there conducting studies on foods & materials for the heck of it.... it is usually people with a profit motive and talk about "self selecting"... corporations have the most to gain from self selective research. I've was an executive at a consumer product company that sponsored lots of research... and have seen the self selection first hand. Seeing a bunch of "positive / no real risk" studies, funded by corporations with very little research done by organizatio
  7. So anybody know the deal with Chilean cuisine... the pics on this travel log smack of generic Latin American business hotel food.. most of those dishes could be anywhere in Latin America ... does Chile not much distinctive cuisine... or is it just marginalized, hard to find etc.,
  8. Whoa, whoa, whoa... Who do you think funds most studies on things related to consumer goods? Not a lot of people are sitting out there conducting studies on foods & materials for the heck of it.... it is usually people with a profit motive and talk about "self selecting"... corporations have the most to gain from self selective research. I've was an executive at a consumer product company that sponsored lots of research... and have seen the self selection first hand. Seeing a bunch of "positive / no real risk" studies, funded by corporations with very little research done by organizatio
  9. Is there really a market? In Beverly Hills, where demographics suggest a nice kosher restaurant might be most viable, there is a surprising dearth of fine dining restaurants (large portion mid level places are the preference) and it seems Red Lobster might be the busiest place of all
  10. Hello... Huaraches are THE regional antojito in many towns around Mexico City (and in the city proper as well)... basically they are the Sope of that area although the toppings are very regional... meaning your typical Huarache lady is more like to have Huitlacoche, Squash Blossoms, Nopales, Cecina, Carne Adobada etc., than Carnitas, Shredded Chicken etc., Fellow Egullet poster Menu In Progress has a nice post on Huaraches: http://menuinprogress.com/2008/03/mexico-city-el-huarache-azteca.html I personally wouldn't buy the packaged version myself... but the way to reheat them is to melt a littl
  11. If you want a real Mexican foodies experience in Puerto Vallarta then follow a couple simple rules: 1) If the place has Chips & Salsa or Burritos... keep walking 2) Stay away from "International Cuisine" type places (which is what proliferates in the tourist areas... joints that have a few pasta dishes, CA style salads, surf & turf interspersed with Mexican dishes etc.,) For regional cuisine here are the dishes you are looking for: Ceviche de Mojarra (Diapterus peruvianus) or Pulpo (Octopus) Albondigas de Camaron or Pescado (A soup of Shrimp or Fish balls & seasonal veggies in a
  12. I press my tortillas between two ceramic dishes... try that.. if they are still too thick then maybe your dough is too dry.
  13. I also buy bags of "fresh" masa... one brand I am pretty sure is Maseca (white corn) the other nixtamal (yellow corn with lots of kernel in it)... honestly the techniques work identically for my setup.
  14. Tortilla warmer (those little round things designed for the purpose -- not much other utility, but shouldn't cost more than $5 or so), or maybe wrapped in a slightly moist, clean kitchen towel? Or, cook / heat them as you need them, which is how it usually works at our house. Also most hand made tortillas will benefit from steaming in their heat for a few minutes as they become much more pliable after they have been in the warmer. In fact, even in Pre-Hispanic times the most common practice for tortillas was to wrap them in Cotton cloth inside of a Chiquihuite / Xikihuitl (woven natural fibe
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